• Common trends in model order reduction of large nonlinear finite-element-discretized systems involve the introduction of a linear mapping into a reduced set of unknowns, followed by Galerkin projection of the governing equations onto a constant reduction basis. Though this reduces the number of unknowns in the system, the computational cost for obtaining the solution could still be high due to the prohibitive computational costs involved in the evaluation of nonlinear terms. Hyper-reduction methods are then seen as a fast way of approximating the nonlinearity in the system of equations. In the finite element context, the energy conserving sampling and weighing (ECSW) method has emerged as a stability and structure-preserving method for hyper-reduction. Classical hyper-reduction techniques, however, are applicable only in the context of linear mappings into the reduction subspace. In this work, we extend the concept of hyper-reduction using ECSW to general nonlinear mappings, while retaining its desirable stability and structure-preserving properties. As a proof of concept, the proposed hyper-reduction technique is demonstrated over models of a flat plate and a realistic wing structure, whose dynamics has been shown to evolve over a nonlinear (quadratic) manifold. An online speed-up of over one thousand times relative to the full system has been obtained for the wing structure using the proposed method, which is higher than its linear counterpart using the ECSW.
  • EnKF-C user guide (1410.1233)

    Feb. 21, 2019 cs.CE
    EnKF-C provides a compact generic framework for off-line data assimilation into large-scale layered geophysical models with the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). It is coded in C for GNU/Linux platform and can work either in EnKF or ensemble optimal interpolation (EnOI) mode.
  • Scaling algorithms for entropic transport-type problems have become a very popular numerical method, encompassing Wasserstein barycenters, multi-marginal problems, gradient flows and unbalanced transport. However, a standard implementation of the scaling algorithm has several numerical limitations: the scaling factors diverge and convergence becomes impractically slow as the entropy regularization approaches zero. Moreover, handling the dense kernel matrix becomes unfeasible for large problems. To address this, we combine several modifications: A log-domain stabilized formulation, the well-known epsilon-scaling heuristic, an adaptive truncation of the kernel and a coarse-to-fine scheme. This permits the solution of larger problems with smaller regularization and negligible truncation error. A new convergence analysis of the Sinkhorn algorithm is developed, working towards a better understanding of epsilon-scaling. Numerical examples illustrate efficiency and versatility of the modified algorithm.
  • This report describes the computation of gradients by algorithmic differentiation for statistically optimum beamforming operations. Especially the derivation of complex-valued functions is a key component of this approach. Therefore the real-valued algorithmic differentiation is extended via the complex-valued chain rule. In addition to the basic mathematic operations the derivative of the eigenvalue problem with complex-valued eigenvectors is one of the key results of this report. The potential of this approach is shown with experimental results on the CHiME-3 challenge database. There, the beamforming task is used as a front-end for an ASR system. With the developed derivatives a joint optimization of a speech enhancement and speech recognition system w.r.t. the recognition optimization criterion is possible.
  • We develop an algorithm that forecasts cascading events, by employing a Green's function scheme on the basis of the self-exciting point process model. This method is applied to open data of 10 types of crimes happened in Chicago. It shows a good prediction accuracy superior to or comparable to the standard methods which are the expectation-maximization method and prospective hotspot maps method. We find a cascade influence of the crimes that has a long-time, logarithmic tail; this result is consistent with an earlier study on burglaries. This long-tail feature cannot be reproduced by the other standard methods. In addition, a merit of the Green's function method is the low computational cost in the case of high density of events and/or large amount of the training data.
  • The development of chemical reaction models aids understanding and prediction in areas ranging from biology to electrochemistry and combustion. A systematic approach to building reaction network models uses observational data not only to estimate unknown parameters, but also to learn model structure. Bayesian inference provides a natural approach to this data-driven construction of models. Yet traditional Bayesian model inference methodologies that numerically evaluate the evidence for each model are often infeasible for nonlinear reaction network inference, as the number of plausible models can be combinatorially large. Alternative approaches based on model-space sampling can enable large-scale network inference, but their realization presents many challenges. In this paper, we present new computational methods that make large-scale nonlinear network inference tractable. First, we exploit the topology of networks describing potential interactions among chemical species to design improved "between-model" proposals for reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo. Second, we introduce a sensitivity-based determination of move types which, when combined with network-aware proposals, yields significant additional gains in sampling performance. These algorithms are demonstrated on inference problems drawn from systems biology, with nonlinear differential equation models of species interactions.
  • We design, analyse and implement an arbitrary order scheme applicable to generic meshes for a coupled elliptic-parabolic PDE system describing miscible displacement in porous media. The discretisation is based on several adaptations of the Hybrid-High-Order (HHO) method due to Di Pietro et al. [Computational Methods in Applied Mathematics, 14(4), (2014)]. The equation governing the pressure is discretised using an adaptation of the HHO method for variable diffusion, while the discrete concentration equation is based on the HHO method for advection-diffusion-reaction problems combined with numerically stable flux reconstructions for the advective velocity that we have derived using the results of Cockburn et al. [ESAIM: Mathematical Modelling and Numerical Analysis, 50(3), (2016)]. We perform some rigorous analysis of the method to demonstrate its $L^2$ stability under the irregular data often presented by reservoir engineering problems and present several numerical tests to demonstrate the quality of the results that are produced by the proposed scheme.
  • A unified fluid-structure interaction (FSI) formulation is presented for solid, liquid and mixed membranes. Nonlinear finite elements (FE) and the generalized-alpha scheme are used for the spatial and temporal discretization. The membrane discretization is based on curvilinear surface elements that can describe large deformations and rotations, and also provide a straightforward description for contact. The fluid is described by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and its discretization is based on stabilized Petrov-Galerkin FE. The coupling between fluid and structure uses a conforming sharp interface discretization, and the resulting non-linear FE equations are solved monolithically within the Newton-Raphson scheme. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used for the fluid in order to account for the mesh motion around the structure. The formulation is very general and admits diverse applications that include contact at free surfaces. This is demonstrated by two analytical and three numerical examples exhibiting strong coupling between fluid and structure. The examples include balloon inflation, droplet rolling and flapping flags. They span a Reynolds-number range from 0.001 to 2000. One of the examples considers the extension to rotation-free shells using isogeometric FE.
  • The fraction nonconforming is a key quality measure used in statistical quality control design in clinical laboratory medicine. The confidence bounds of normal populations of measurements for the fraction nonconforming each of the lower and upper quality specification limits when both the random and the systematic error are unknown can be calculated using the noncentral t-distribution, as it is described in detail and illustrated with examples.
  • Despite its numerical challenges, finite element method is used to compute viscous fluid flow. A consensus on the cause of numerical problems has been reached; however, general algorithms---allowing a robust and accurate simulation for any process---are still missing. Either a very high computational cost is necessary for a direct numerical solution (DNS) or some limiting procedure is used by adding artificial dissipation to the system. These stabilization methods are useful; however, they are often applied relative to the element size such that a local monotonous convergence is challenging to acquire. We need a computational strategy for solving viscous fluid flow using solely the balance equations. In this work, we present a general procedure solving fluid mechanics problems without use of any stabilization or splitting schemes. Hence, its generalization to multiphysics applications is straightforward. We discuss emerging numerical problems and present the methodology rigorously. Implementation is achieved by using open-source packages and the accuracy as well as the robustness is demonstrated by comparing results to the closed-form solutions and also by solving well-known benchmarking problems.
  • We propose a new approach to linear ill-posed inverse problems. Our algorithm alternates between enforcing two constraints: the measurements and the statistical correlation structure in some transformed space. We use a non-linear multiscale scattering transform which discards the phase and thus exposes strong spectral correlations otherwise hidden beneath the phase fluctuations. As a result, both constraints may be put into effect by linear projections in their respective spaces. We apply the algorithm to super-resolution and tomography and show that it outperforms ad hoc convex regularizers and stably recovers the missing spectrum.
  • This paper introduces a novel boundary integral approach of shape uncertainty quantification for the Helmholtz scattering problem in the framework of the so-called parametric method. The key idea is to construct an integration grid whose associated weight function encompasses the irregularities and nonsmoothness imposed by the random boundary. Thus, the solution can be evaluated accurately with relatively low number of grid points. The integration grid is obtained by employing a low-dimensional spatial embedding using the coarea formula. The proposed method can handle large variation as well as non-smoothness of the random boundary. For the ease of presentation the theory is restricted to star-shaped obstacles in low-dimensional setting. Higher spatial and parametric dimensional cases are discussed, though, not extensively explored in the current study.
  • We present a continuous model for structural brain connectivity based on the Poisson point process. The model treats each streamline curve in a tractography as an observed event in connectome space, here a product space of cortical white matter boundaries. We approximate the model parameter via kernel density estimation. To deal with the heavy computational burden, we develop a fast parameter estimation method by pre-computing associated Legendre products of the data, leveraging properties of the spherical heat kernel. We show how our approach can be used to assess the quality of cortical parcellations with respect to connectivty. We further present empirical results that suggest the discrete connectomes derived from our model have substantially higher test-retest reliability compared to standard methods.
  • The optimization of power systems involves complex uncertainties, such as technological progress, political context, geopolitical constraints. Negotiations at COP21 are complicated by the huge number of scenarios that various people want to consider; these scenarios correspond to many uncertainties. These uncertainties are difficult to modelize as probabilities, due to the lack of data for future technologies and due to partially adversarial geopolitical decision makers. Tools for such difficult decision making problems include Wald and Savage criteria, possibilistic reasoning and Nash equilibria. We investigate the rationale behind the use of a two-player Nash equilibrium approach in such a difficult context; we show that the computational cost is indeed smaller than for simpler criteria. Moreover, it naturally provides a selection of decisions and scenarios, and it has a natural interpretation in the sense that Nature does not make decisions taking into account our own decisions. The algorithm naturally provides a matrix of results, namely the matrix of outcomes in the most interesting decisions and for the most critical scenarios. These decisions and scenarios are also equipped with a ranking.
  • To the knowledge of the author, this is the first time it has been shown that interest rates that are extremely high by modern standards (100% and higher) are necessary within a zero-sum monetary system, and not just driven by greed. Extreme interest rates that appeared in various places and times reinforce the idea that hard money may have contributed to high rates of interest. Here a model is presented that examines the interest rate required to succeed as an investor in a zero-sum fixed quantity hard-money system. Even when the playing field is significantly tilted toward the investor, interest rates need to be much higher than expected. In a completely fair zero-sum system, an investor cannot break even without charging 100% interest. Even with a 5% advantage, an investor won't break even at 15% interest. From this it is concluded that what we consider usurious rates today are, within a hard-money system, driven by necessity. Cryptocurrency is a novel form of hard-currency. The inability to virtualize the money creates a system close to zero-sum because of the limited supply design. Therefore, within the bounds of a cryptocurrency system that limits money creation, interest rates must rise to levels that the modern world considers usury. It is impossible, therefore, that a cryptocurrency that is not expandable could take over a modern economy and replace modern fiat currency.
  • This paper presents our work on designing a parallel platform for large-scale reservoir simulations. Detailed components, such as grid and linear solver, and data structures are introduced, which can serve as a guide to parallel reservoir simulations and other parallel applications. The main objective of platform is to support implementation of various parallel reservoir simulators on distributed-memory parallel systems, where MPI (Message Passing Interface) is employed for communications among computation nodes. It provides structured grid due to its simplicity and cell-centered data is applied for each cell. The platform has a distributed matrix and vector module and a map module. The matrix and vector module is the base of our parallel linear systems. The map connects grid and linear system modules, which defines various mappings between grid and linear systems. Commonly-used Krylov subspace linear solvers are implemented, including the restarted GMRES method and the BiCGSTAB method. It also has an interface to a parallel algebraic multigrid solver, BoomerAMG from HYPRE. Parallel general-purpose preconditioners and special preconditioners for reservoir simulations are also developed. Various data structures are designed, such as grid, cell, data, linear solver and preconditioner, and some key default parameters are presented in this paper. The numerical experiments show that our platform has excellent scalability and it can simulate giant reservoir models with hundreds of millions of grid cells using thousands of CPU cores.
  • Managing the prediction of metrics in high-frequency financial markets is a challenging task. An efficient way is by monitoring the dynamics of a limit order book to identify the information edge. This paper describes the first publicly available benchmark dataset of high-frequency limit order markets for mid-price prediction. We extracted normalized data representations of time series data for five stocks from the NASDAQ Nordic stock market for a time period of ten consecutive days, leading to a dataset of ~4,000,000 time series samples in total. A day-based anchored cross-validation experimental protocol is also provided that can be used as a benchmark for comparing the performance of state-of-the-art methodologies. Performance of baseline approaches are also provided to facilitate experimental comparisons. We expect that such a large-scale dataset can serve as a testbed for devising novel solutions of expert systems for high-frequency limit order book data analysis.
  • We devise and evaluate numerically Hybrid High-Order (HHO) methods for hyperelastic materials undergoing finite deformations. The HHO methods use as discrete unknowns piecewise polynomials of order $k\ge1$ on the mesh skeleton, together with cell-based polynomials that can be eliminated locally by static condensation. The discrete problem is written as the minimization of the broken nonlinear elastic energy where a local reconstruction of the displacement gradient is used. Two HHO methods are considered: a stabilized method where the gradient is reconstructed as a tensor-valued polynomial of order $k$ and a stabilization is added to the discrete energy functional, and an unstabilized method which reconstructs a stable higher-order gradient and circumvents the need for stabilization. Both methods satisfy the principle of virtual work locally with equilibrated tractions. We present a numerical study of both HHO methods on test cases with known solution and on more challenging three-dimensional test cases including finite deformations with strong shear layers and cavitating voids. We assess the computational efficiency of both methods, and we compare our results to those obtained with an industrial software using conforming finite elements and to results from the literature. Both methods exhibit robust behavior in the quasi-incompressible regime.
  • Bayesian methods and their implementations by means of sophisticated Monte Carlo techniques have become very popular in signal processing over the last years. Importance Sampling (IS) is a well-known Monte Carlo technique that approximates integrals involving a posterior distribution by means of weighted samples. In this work, we study the assignation of a single weighted sample which compresses the information contained in a population of weighted samples. Part of the theory that we present as Group Importance Sampling (GIS) has been employed implicitly in different works in the literature. The provided analysis yields several theoretical and practical consequences. For instance, we discuss the application of GIS into the Sequential Importance Resampling framework and show that Independent Multiple Try Metropolis schemes can be interpreted as a standard Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, following the GIS approach. We also introduce two novel Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques based on GIS. The first one, named Group Metropolis Sampling method, produces a Markov chain of sets of weighted samples. All these sets are then employed for obtaining a unique global estimator. The second one is the Distributed Particle Metropolis-Hastings technique, where different parallel particle filters are jointly used to drive an MCMC algorithm. Different resampled trajectories are compared and then tested with a proper acceptance probability. The novel schemes are tested in different numerical experiments such as learning the hyperparameters of Gaussian Processes, two localization problems in a wireless sensor network (with synthetic and real data) and the tracking of vegetation parameters given satellite observations, where they are compared with several benchmark Monte Carlo techniques. Three illustrative Matlab demos are also provided.
  • Learning to detect fraud in large-scale accounting data is one of the long-standing challenges in financial statement audits or fraud investigations. Nowadays, the majority of applied techniques refer to handcrafted rules derived from known fraud scenarios. While fairly successful, these rules exhibit the drawback that they often fail to generalize beyond known fraud scenarios and fraudsters gradually find ways to circumvent them. To overcome this disadvantage and inspired by the recent success of deep learning we propose the application of deep autoencoder neural networks to detect anomalous journal entries. We demonstrate that the trained network's reconstruction error obtainable for a journal entry and regularized by the entry's individual attribute probabilities can be interpreted as a highly adaptive anomaly assessment. Experiments on two real-world datasets of journal entries, show the effectiveness of the approach resulting in high f1-scores of 32.93 (dataset A) and 16.95 (dataset B) and less false positive alerts compared to state of the art baseline methods. Initial feedback received by chartered accountants and fraud examiners underpinned the quality of the approach in capturing highly relevant accounting anomalies.
  • We present a novel approach to fast on-the-fly low order finite element assembly for scalar elliptic partial differential equations of Darcy type with variable coefficients optimized for matrix-free implementations. Our approach introduces a new operator that is obtained by appropriately scaling the reference stiffness matrix from the constant coefficient case. Assuming sufficient regularity, an a priori analysis shows that solutions obtained by this approach are unique and have asymptotically optimal order convergence in the $H^1$- and the $L^2$-norm on hierarchical hybrid grids. For the pre-asymptotic regime, we present a local modification that guarantees uniform ellipticity of the operator. Cost considerations show that our novel approach requires roughly one third of the floating-point operations compared to a classical finite element assembly scheme employing nodal integration. Our theoretical considerations are illustrated by numerical tests that confirm the expectations with respect to accuracy and run-time. A large scale application with more than a hundred billion ($1.6\cdot10^{11}$) degrees of freedom executed on 14,310 compute cores demonstrates the efficiency of the new scaling approach.
  • Reliability theory is used to assess the sensitivity of a passive flexion and active flexion of the human lower leg Finite Element (FE) models with Total Knee Replacement (TKR) to the variability in the input parameters of the respective FE models. The sensitivity of the active flexion simulating the stair ascent of the human lower leg FE model with TKR was presented before in [1,2] whereas now in this paper a comparison is made with the passive flexion of the human lower leg FE model with TKR. First, with the Monte Carlo Simulation Technique (MCST), a number of randomly generated input data of the FE model(s) are obtained based on the normal standard deviations of the respective input parameters. Then a series of FE simulations are done and the output kinematics and peak contact pressures are obtained for the respective FE models (passive flexion and/or active flexion models). Seven output performance measures are reported for the passive flexion model and one more parameter was reported for the active flexion FE model (patello-femoral peak contact pressure) in [1]. A sensitivity study will be performed based on the Response Surface Method (RSM) to identify the key parameters that influence the kinematics and peak contact pressures of the passive flexion FE model. Another two MCST and RSM-based probabilistic FE analyses will be performed based on a reduced list of 19 key input parameters. In total 4 probabilistic FE analyses will be performed: 2 probabilistic FE analyses (MCST and RSM) based on an extended set of 78 input variables and another 2 probabilistic FE analyses (MCST and RSM) based on a reduced set of 19 input variables. Due to the likely computation cost in order to make hundreds of FE simulations with MCST, a high-performance and distributed computing system will be used for the passive flexion FE model the same as it was used for the active flexion FE model in [1].
  • Designed to compete with fiat currencies, bitcoin proposes it is a crypto-currency alternative. Bitcoin makes a number of false claims, including: solving the double-spending problem is a good thing; bitcoin can be a reserve currency for banking; hoarding equals saving, and that we should believe bitcoin can expand by deflation to become a global transactional currency supply. Bitcoin's developers combine technical implementation proficiency with ignorance of currency and banking fundamentals. This has resulted in a failed attempt to change finance. A set of recommendations to change finance are provided in the Afterword: Investment/venture banking for the masses; Venture banking to bring back what investment banks once were; Open-outcry exchange for all CDS contracts; Attempting to develop CDS type contracts on investments in startup and existing enterprises; and Improving the connection between startup tech/ideas, business organization and investment.
  • Multiscale models allow for the treatment of complex phenomena involving different scales, such as remodeling and growth of tissues, muscular activation, and cardiac electrophysiology. Numerous numerical approaches have been developed to simulate multiscale problems. However, compared to the well-established methods for classical problems, many questions have yet to be answered. Here, we give an overview of existing models and methods, with particular emphasis on mechanical and bio-mechanical applications. Moreover, we discuss state-of-the-art techniques for multilevel and multifidelity uncertainty quantification. In particular, we focus on the similarities that can be found across multiscale models, discretizations, solvers, and statistical methods for uncertainty quantification. Similarly to the current trend of removing the segregation between discretizations and solution methods in scientific computing, we anticipate that the future of multiscale simulation will provide a closer interaction with also the models and the statistical methods. This will yield better strategies for transferring the information across different scales and for a more seamless transition in selecting and adapting the level of details in the models. Finally, we note that machine learning and Bayesian techniques have shown a promising capability to capture complex model dependencies and enrich the results with statistical information; therefore, they can complement traditional physics-based and numerical analysis approaches.
  • Two-dimensional (2D) pressure field estimation in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been done using three-dimensional (3D) pressure field calculations followed by averaging, which is computationally expensive due to 3D convolutions. In this work, we develop a direct 2D pressure field estimation method which is much faster than 3D methods without losing accuracy. The method is validated with MD simulations on two systems: a liquid film and a cylindrical drop of argon suspended in surrounding vapor.