• The concept of open weak CAD is introduced. Every open CAD is an open weak CAD. On the contrary, an open weak CAD is not necessarily an open CAD. An algorithm for computing projection polynomials of open weak CADs is proposed. The key idea is to compute the intersection of projection factor sets produced by different projection orders. The resulting open weak CAD often has smaller number of sample points than open CADs. The algorithm can be used for computing sample points for all open connected components of $ f\neq0$ for a given polynomial $f$. It can also be used for many other applications, such as testing semi-definiteness of polynomials and copositive problems. In fact, we solved several difficult semi-definiteness problems efficiently by using the algorithm. Furthermore, applying the algorithm to copositive problems, we find an explicit expression of the polynomials producing open weak CADs under some conditions, which significantly improves the efficiency of solving copositive problems.
  • Given a zero-dimensional ideal I in a polynomial ring, many computations start by finding univariate polynomials in I. Searching for a univariate polynomial in I is a particular case of considering the minimal polynomial of an element in P/I. It is well known that minimal polynomials may be computed via elimination, therefore this is considered to be a "resolved problem". But being the key of so many computations, it is worth investigating its meaning, its optimization, its applications (e.g. testing if a zero-dimensional ideal is radical, primary or maximal). We present efficient algorithms for computing the minimal polynomial of an element of P/I. For the specific case where the coefficients are in Q, we show how to use modular methods to obtain a guaranteed result. We also present some applications of minimal polynomials, namely algorithms for computing radicals and primary decompositions of zero-dimensional ideals, and also for testing radicality and maximality.
  • The main purpose of this paper is pedagogical. Despite its importance, all proofs of the correctness of Strassen's famous 1969 algorithm to multiply two 2x2 matrices with only seven multiplications involve some basis-dependent calculations such as explicitly multiplying specific 2x2 matrices, expanding expressions to cancel terms with opposing signs, or expanding tensors over the standard basis. This makes the proof nontrivial to memorize and many presentations of the proof avoid showing all the details and leave a significant amount of verifications to the reader. In this note we give a short, self-contained, basis-independent proof of the existence of Strassen's algorithm that avoids these types of calculations. We achieve this by focusing on symmetries and algebraic properties. Our proof can be seen as a coordinate-free version of the construction of Clausen from 1988, combined with recent work on the geometry of Strassen's algorithm by Chiantini, Ikenmeyer, Landsberg, and Ottaviani from 2016.
  • Galois field (GF) arithmetic is used to implement critical arithmetic components in communication and security-related hardware, and verification of such components is of prime importance. Current techniques for formally verifying such components are based on computer algebra methods that proved successful in verification of integer arithmetic circuits. However, these methods are sequential in nature and do not offer any parallelism. This paper presents an algebraic functional verification technique of gate-level GF (2m ) multipliers, in which verification is performed in bit-parallel fashion. The method is based on extracting a unique polynomial in Galois field of each output bit independently. We demonstrate that this method is able to verify an n-bit GF multiplier in n threads. Experiments performed on pre- and post-synthesized Mastrovito and Montgomery multipliers show high efficiency up to 571 bits.
  • In this paper we investigate the complexity of model selection and model testing for dynamical systems with toric steady states. Such systems frequently arise in the study of chemical reaction networks. We do this by formulating these tasks as a constrained optimization problem in Euclidean space. This optimization problem is known as a Euclidean distance problem; the complexity of solving this problem is measured by an invariant called the Euclidean distance (ED) degree. We determine closed-form expressions for the ED degree of the steady states of several families of chemical reaction networks with toric steady states and arbitrarily many reactions. To illustrate the utility of this work we show how the ED degree can be used as a tool for estimating the computational cost of solving the model testing and model selection problems.
  • In 2012, Barbulescu, Detrey, Estibals and Zimmermann proposed a new framework to exhaustively search for optimal formulae for evaluating bilinear maps, such as Strassen or Karatsuba formulae. The main contribution of this work is a new criterion to aggressively prune useless branches in the exhaustive search, thus leading to the computation of new optimal formulae, in particular for the short product modulo X 5 and the circulant product modulo (X 5 -- 1). Moreover , we are able to prove that there is essentially only one optimal decomposition of the product of 3 x 2 by 2 x 3 matrices up to the action of some group of automorphisms.
  • We give an efficient algorithm to enumerate all sets of $r\ge 1$ quadratic polynomials over a finite field, which remain irreducible under iterations and compositions.
  • In this article we determine a generating set of rational invariants of minimal cardinality for the action of the orthogonal group $\mathrm{O}_3$ on the space $\mathbb{R}[x,y,z]_{2d}$ of ternary forms of even degree $2d$. The construction relies on two key ingredients: On one hand, the Slice Lemma allows us to reduce the problem to dermining the invariants for the action on a subspace of the finite subgroup $\mathrm{B}_3$ of signed permutations. On the other hand, our construction relies in a fundamental way on specific bases of harmonic polynomials. These bases provide maps with prescribed $\mathrm{B}_3$-equivariance properties. Our explicit construction of these bases should be relevant well beyond the scope of this paper. The expression of the $\mathrm{B}_3$-invariants can then be given in a compact form as the composition of two equivariant maps. Instead of providing (cumbersome) explicit expressions for the $\mathrm{O}_3$-invariants, we provide efficient algorithms for their evaluation and rewriting. We also use the constructed $\mathrm{B}_3$-invariants to determine the $\mathrm{O}_3$-orbit locus and provide an algorithm for the inverse problem of finding an element in $\mathbb{R}[x,y,z]_{2d}$ with prescribed values for its invariants. These are the computational issues relevant in brain imaging.
  • The \texttt{StronglyStableIdeals} package for \textit{Macaulay2} provides a method to compute all saturated strongly stable ideals in a given polynomial ring with a fixed Hilbert polynomial. A description of the main method and auxiliary tools is given.
  • We give a separation bound for the complex roots of a trinomial $f \in \mathbb{Z}[X]$. The logarithm of the inverse of our separation bound is polynomial in the size of the sparse encoding of $f$; in particular, it is polynomial in $\log (\deg f)$. It is known that no such bound is possible for 4-nomials (polynomials with 4 monomials). For trinomials, the classical results (which are based on the degree of $f$ rather than the number of monomials) give separation bounds that are exponentially worse.As an algorithmic application, we show that the number of real roots of a trinomial $f$ can be computed in time polynomial in the size of the sparse encoding of~$f$. The same problem is open for 4-nomials.
  • Chvatal-Gomory (CG) cuts and the Bienstock-Zuckerberg hierarchy capture useful linear programs that the standard bounded degree Lasserre/Sum-of-Squares SOS hierarchy fails to capture. In this paper we present a novel polynomial time SOS hierarchy for 0/1 problems with a custom subspace of high degree polynomials (not the standard subspace of low-degree polynomials). We show that the new SOS hierarchy recovers the Bienstock-Zuckerberg hierarchy. Our result implies a linear program that reproduces the Bienstock-Zuckerberg hierarchy as a polynomial sized, efficiently constructive extended formulation that satisfies all constant pitch inequalities. The construction is also very simple, and it is fully defined by giving the supporting polynomials. Moreover, for a class of polytopes (e.g. set covering and packing problems) it optimizes, up to an arbitrarily small error, over the polytope resulting from any constant rounds of CG cuts. Arguably, this is the first example where different basis functions can be useful in asymmetric situations to obtain a hierarchy of relaxations.
  • We propose a randomized polynomial time algorithm for computing nontrivial zeros of quadratic forms in 4 or more variables over $\mathbb{F}_q(t)$, where $\mathbb{F}_q$ is a finite field of odd characteristic. The algorithm is based on a suitable splitting of the form into two forms and finding a common value they both represent. We make use of an effective formula for the number of fixed degree irreducible polynomials in a given residue class. We apply our algorithms for computing a Witt decomposition of a quadratic form, for computing an explicit isometry between quadratic forms and finding zero divisors in quaternion algebras over quadratic extensions of $\mathbb{F}_q(t)$.
  • We propose an algorithm for finding zero divisors in quaternion algebras over quadratic number fields, or equivalently, solving homogeneous quadratic equations in three variables over $\mathbb{Q}(\sqrt{d})$ where $d$ is a square-free integer. The algorithm is randomized and runs in polynomial time if one is allowed to call oracles for factoring integers.
  • In this paper we take a look at Automatic Differentiation through the eyes of Tensor and Operational Calculus. This work is best consumed as supplementary material for learning tensor and operational calculus by those already familiar with automatic differentiation. To that purpose, we provide a simple implementation of automatic differentiation, where the steps taken are explained in the language tensor and operational calculus.
  • We propose to consider ensembles of cycles (quadrics), which are interconnected through conformal-invariant geometric relations (e.g. "to be orthogonal", "to be tangent", etc.), as new objects in an extended Moebius--Lie geometry. It was recently demonstrated in several related papers, that such ensembles of cycles naturally parameterise many other conformally-invariant objects, e.g. loxodromes or continued fractions. The paper describes a method, which reduces a collection of conformally invariant geometric relations to a system of linear equations, which may be accompanied by one fixed quadratic relation. To show its usefulness, the method is implemented as a C++ library. It operates with numeric and symbolic data of cycles in spaces of arbitrary dimensionality and metrics with any signatures. Numeric calculations can be done in exact or approximate arithmetic. In the two- and three-dimensional cases illustrations and animations can be produced. An interactive Python wrapper of the library is provided as well.
  • In this paper, we propose two new deterministic interpolation algorithms for a sparse multivariate polynomial given as a standard black-box by introducing new Kronecker type substitutions. Let $f\in \RB[x_1,\dots,x_n]$ be a sparse black-box polynomial with a degree bound $D$. When $\RB=\C$ or a finite field, our algorithms either have better bit complexity or better bit complexity in $D$ than existing deterministic algorithms. In particular, in the case of deterministic algorithms for standard black-box models, our second algorithm has the current best complexity in $D$ which is the dominant factor in the complexity.
  • Elimination of unknowns in systems of equations, starting with Gaussian elimination, is a problem of general interest. The problem of finding an a priori upper bound for the number of differentiations in elimination of unknowns in a system of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) is an important challenge, going back to Ritt (1932). The first characterization of this via an asymptotic analysis is due to Grigoriev's result (1989) on quantifier elimination in differential fields, but the challenge still remained. In this paper, we present a new bound, which is a major improvement over the previously known results. We also present a new lower bound, which shows asymptotic tightness of our upper bound in low dimensions, which are frequently occurring in applications. Finally, we discuss applications of our results to designing new algorithms for elimination of unknowns in systems of DAEs.
  • In this paper, we propose new deterministic and Monte Carlo interpolation algorithms for sparse multivariate polynomials represented by straight-line programs. Let $f$ be an $n$-variate polynomial given by a straight-line program, which has a degree bound $D$ and a term bound $T$. Our deterministic algorithm is quadratic in $n,T$ and cubic in $\log D$ in the Soft-Oh sense, which has better complexities than existing deterministic interpolation algorithms in most cases. Our Monte Carlo interpolation algorithms have better complexities than existing Monte Carlo interpolation algorithms and are the first algorithms whose complexities are linear in $nT$ in the Soft-Oh sense. Since $nT$ is a factor of the size of $f$, our Monte Carlo algorithms are optimal in $n$ and $T$ in the Soft-Oh sense.
  • The computation of Gr\"obner bases is an established hard problem. By contrast with many other problems, however, there has been little investigation of whether this hardness is robust. In this paper, we frame and present results on the problem of approximate computation of Gr\"obner bases. We show that it is NP-hard to construct a Gr\"obner basis of the ideal generated by a set of polynomials, even when the algorithm is allowed to discard a $(1 - \epsilon)$ fraction of the generators, and likewise when the algorithm is allowed to discard variables (and the generators containing them). Our results shows that computation of Gr\"obner bases is robustly hard even for simple polynomial systems (e.g. maximum degree 2, with at most 3 variables per generator). We conclude by greatly strengthening results for the Strong $c$-Partial Gr\"obner problem posed by De Loera et al. Our proofs also establish interesting connections between the robust hardness of Gr\"obner bases and that of SAT variants and graph-coloring.
  • We evaluate a curious determinant, first mentioned by George Andrews in 1980 in the context of descending plane partitions. Our strategy is to combine the famous Desnanot-Jacobi-Dodgson identity with automated proof techniques. More precisely, we follow the holonomic ansatz that was proposed by Doron Zeilberger in 2007. We derive a compact and nice formula for Andrews's determinant, and use it to solve a challenge problem that we posed in a previous paper. By noting that Andrews's determinant is a special case of a two-parameter family of determinants, we find closed forms for several one-parameter subfamilies. The interest in these determinants arises because they count cyclically symmetric rhombus tilings of a hexagon with several triangular holes inside.
  • The celebrated integer relation finding algorithm PSLQ has been successfully used in many applications. PSLQ was only analyzed theoretically for exact input data, however, when the input data are irrational numbers, they must be approximate ones due to the finite precision of the computer. When the algorithm takes empirical data (inexact data with error bounded) instead of exact real numbers as its input, how do we theoretically ensure the output of the algorithm to be an exact integer relation? In this paper, we investigate the PSLQ algorithm for empirical data as its input. Firstly, we give a termination condition for this case. Secondly, we analyze a perturbation on the hyperplane matrix constructed from the input data and hence disclose a relationship between the accuracy of the input data and the output quality (an upper bound on the absolute value of the inner product of the exact data and the computed integer relation), which naturally leads to an error control strategy for PSLQ. Further, we analyze the complexity bound of the PSLQ algorithm for empirical data. Examples on transcendental numbers and algebraic numbers show the meaningfulness of our error control strategy.
  • Computations with integro-differential operators are often carried out in an associative algebra with unit, and they are essentially non-commutative computations. By adjoining a cocommutative co-product, one can have those operators perform act on a bialgebra isomorphic to an enveloping algebra. That gives an adequate framework for a computer-algebra implementation via monoidal factorization, (pure) transcendence bases and Poincar\'e--Birkhoff--Witt bases. In this paper, we systematically study these deformations, obtaining necessary and sufficient conditions for the operators to exist, and we give the most general cocommutative deformations of the shuffle co-product and an effective construction of pairs of bases in duality. The paper ends by the combinatorial setting of local systems of coordinates on the group of group-like series.
  • In 1992, Wilf and Zeilberger conjectured that a hypergeometric term in several discrete and continuous variables is holonomic if and only if it is proper. Strictly speaking the conjecture does not hold, but it is true when reformulated properly: Payne proved a piecewise interpretation in 1997, and independently, Abramov and Petkovsek in 2002 proved a conjugate interpretation. Both results address the pure discrete case of the conjecture. In this paper we extend their work to hypergeometric terms in several discrete and continuous variables and prove the conjugate interpretation of the Wilf-Zeilberger conjecture in this mixed setting.
  • We present a probabilistic Las Vegas algorithm for computing the local zeta function of a hyperelliptic curve of genus $g$ defined over $\mathbb{F}_q$. It is based on the approaches by Schoof and Pila combined with a modeling of the $\ell$-torsion by structured polynomial systems. Our main result improves on previously known complexity bounds by showing that there exists a constant $c>0$ such that, for any fixed $g$, this algorithm has expected time and space complexity $O((\log q)^{cg})$ as $q$ grows and the characteristic is large enough.
  • D-finite Numbers (1611.05901)

    May 26, 2018 cs.SC, math.NT
    D-finite functions and P-recursive sequences are defined in terms of linear differential and recurrence equations with polynomial coefficients. In this paper, we introduce a class of numbers closely related to D-finite functions and P-recursive sequences. It consists of the limits of convergent P-recursive sequences. Typically, this class contains many well-known mathematical constants in addition to the algebraic numbers. Our definition of the class of D-finite numbers depends on two subrings of the field of complex numbers. We investigate how different choices of these two subrings affect the class. Moreover, we show that D-finite numbers are essentially limits of D-finite functions at the point one, and evaluating D-finite functions at non-singular algebraic points typically yields D-finite numbers. This result makes it easier to recognize certain numbers to be D-finite.