• The recent LIGO-Virgo detection of gravitational waves from a binary neutron star inspiral event GW170817 and the discovery of its accompanying electromagnetic signals mark a new era for multi-messenger astronomy. In the coming years, advanced gravitational-wave detectors are likely to detect tens to hundreds of similar events. Neutron stars in binaries can possess significant spin, which is imprinted on the gravitational waveform via the effective spin parameter $\chi_\text{eff}$. We explore the astrophysical inferences made possible by gravitational-wave measurements of $\chi_\text{eff}$. First, using a fiducial model informed by radio observations, we estimate that $\approx15-30\%$ of binary neutron stars should have spins measurable at $\gtrsim 90\%$ confidence level by advanced detectors assuming the spin axis of the recycled neutron star aligns with the total orbital angular momentum of the binary. Second, using Bayesian inference, we show that it is possible to tell whether or not the spin axis of the recycled neutron star tends to be aligned with the binary orbit using $\gtrsim 30$ detections. Finally, interesting constraints can be placed on neutron star magnetic field decay after $\gtrsim 300$ detections, if the spin periods and magnetic field strengths of Galactic binary neutron stars are representative of the merging population.
  • Parametric images provide insight into the spatial distribution of physiological parameters, but they are often extremely noisy, due to low SNR of tomographic data. Direct estimation from projections allows accurate noise modeling, improving the results of post-reconstruction fitting. We propose a method, which we name kinetic compressive sensing (KCS), based on a hierarchical Bayesian model and on a novel reconstruction algorithm, that encodes sparsity of kinetic parameters. Parametric maps are reconstructed by maximizing the joint probability, with an Iterated Conditional Modes (ICM) approach, alternating the optimization of activity time series (OS-MAP-OSL), and kinetic parameters (MAP-LM). We evaluated the proposed algorithm on a simulated dynamic phantom: a bias/variance study confirmed how direct estimates can improve the quality of parametric maps over a post-reconstruction fitting, and showed how the novel sparsity prior can further reduce their variance, without affecting bias. Real FDG PET human brain data (Siemens mMR, 40min) images were also processed. Results enforced how the proposed KCS-regularized direct method can produce spatially coherent images and parametric maps, with lower spatial noise and better tissue contrast. A GPU-based open source implementation of the algorithm is provided.
  • We present an updated release of the BaSTI (a Bag of Stellar Tracks and Isochrones) stellar model and isochrone library for a solar scaled heavy element distribution. The main input physics changed from the previous BaSTI release include the solar metal mixture, electron conduction opacities, a few nuclear reaction rates, bolometric corrections, and the treatment of the overshooting efficiency for shrinking convective cores. The new model calculations cover a mass range between 0.1 and 15 Msun, 22 initial chemical compositions between [Fe/H]=-3.20 and +0.45, with helium to metal enrichment ratio dY /dZ=1.31. The isochrones cover an age range between 20 Myr and 14.5 Gyr, take consistently into account the pre-main sequence phase, and have been translated to a large number of popular photometric systems. Asteroseismic properties of the theoretical models have also been calculated. We compare our isochrones with results from independent databases and with several sets of observations, to test the accuracy of the calculations. All stellar evolution tracks, asteroseismic properties and isochrones are made available through a dedicated Web site.
  • Recent developments in the field of robot grasping have shown great improvements in the grasp success rates when dealing with unknown objects. In this work we improve on one of the most promising approaches, the Grasp Quality Convolutional Neural Network (GQ-CNN) trained on the DexNet 2.0 dataset. We propose a new architecture for the GQ-CNN and describe practical improvements that increase the model validation accuracy from 92.2% to 95.8% and from 85.9% to 88.0% on respectively image-wise and object-wise training and validation splits.
  • We study numerically the expansion dynamics of an initially confined quantum wave packet in the presence of a disordered potential and a uniform bias force. For white-noise disorder, we find that the wave packet develops asymmetric algebraic tails for any ratio of the force to the disorder strength. The exponent of the algebraic tails decays smoothly with that ratio and no evidence of a critical behavior on the wave density profile is found. Algebraic localization features a series of critical values of the force-to-disorder strength where the m-th position moment of the wave packet diverges. Below the critical value for the m-th moment, we find fair agreement between the asymptotic long-time value of the m-th moment and the predictions of diagrammatic calculations. Above it, we find that the m-th moment grows algebraically in time. For correlated disorder, we find evidence of systematic delocalization, irrespective to the model of disorder. More precisely, we find a two-step dynamics, where both the center-of-mass position and the width of the wave packet show transient localization, similar to the white-noise case, at short time and delocalization at sufficiently long time. This correlation-induced delocalization is interpreted as due to the decrease of the effective de Broglie wave length, which lowers the effective strength of the disorder in the presence of finite-range correlations.
  • Context. Despite the fact that VW Cephei is one of the well-studied contact binaries in the literature, there is no fully consistent model available that can explain every observed property of this system. Aims. Our motivation is to obtain new spectra along with photometric measurements, to analyze what kind of changes may have happened in the system in the past two decades, and to propose new ideas for explaining them. Methods. For the period analysis we determined 10 new times of minima from our light curves, and constructed a new O$-$C diagram of the system. Radial velocities of the components were determined using the cross-correlation technique. The light curves and radial velocities were modelled simultaneously with the PHOEBE code. All observed spectra were compared to synthetic spectra and equivalent widths of the H$\alpha$ line were measured on their differences. Results. We have re-determined the physical parameters of the system according to our new light curve and spectral models. We confirm that the primary component is more active than the secondary, and there is a correlation between spottedness and the chromospheric activity. We propose that flip-flop phenomenon occurring on the primary component could be a possible explanation of the observed nature of the activity. To explain the period variation of VW Cep, we test two previously suggested scenarios: presence of a fourth body in the system, and the Applegate-mechanism caused by periodic magnetic activity. We conclude that although none of these mechanisms can be ruled out entirely, the available data suggest that mass transfer with a slowly decreasing rate gives the most likely explanation for the period variation of VW Cep.
  • We analyse the velocity dispersion properties of 472 z~0.9 star-forming galaxies observed as part of the KMOS Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey (KROSS). The majority of this sample is rotationally dominated (83 +/- 5% with v_C/sigma_0 > 1) but also dynamically hot and highly turbulent. After correcting for beam smearing effects, the median intrinsic velocity dispersion for the final sample is sigma_0 = 43.2 +/- 0.8 km/s with a rotational velocity to dispersion ratio of v_C/sigma_0 = 2.6 +/- 0.1. To explore the relationship between velocity dispersion, stellar mass, star formation rate and redshift we combine KROSS with data from the SAMI survey (z~0.05) and an intermediate redshift MUSE sample (z~0.5). While there is, at most, a weak trend between velocity dispersion and stellar mass, at fixed mass there is a strong increase with redshift. At all redshifts, galaxies appear to follow the same weak trend of increasing velocity dispersion with star formation rate. Our results are consistent with an evolution of galaxy dynamics driven by disks that are more gas rich, and increasingly gravitationally unstable, as a function of increasing redshift. Finally, we test two analytic models that predict turbulence is driven by either gravitational instabilities or stellar feedback. Both provide an adequate description of the data, and further observations are required to rule out either model.
  • We present the cross-correlation between 151 luminous quasars ($M_{ \mathrm{UV}} < -26$) and 179 protocluster candidates at $z \sim 3.8$, extracted from the Wide imaging survey ($ \sim 121~ $deg$^2$) performed with a part of the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). We find that only two out of 151 quasars reside in regions that are more overdense compared to the average field at $ > 4 \sigma $. The distributions of the distance between quasars and the nearest protoclusters and the significance of the overdensity at the position of quasars are statistically identical to those found for $g$-dropout galaxies, suggesting that quasars tend to reside in almost the same environment as star-forming galaxies at this redshift. Using stacking analysis, we find that the average density of $g$-dropout galaxies around quasars is slightly higher than that around $g$-dropout galaxies on $1.0 - 2.5$ pMpc scales, while at $ < 0.5$ pMpc that around quasars tends to be lower. We also find that quasars with higher UV-luminosity or with more massive black holes tend to avoid the most overdense regions, and that the quasar near zone sizes are anti-correlated with overdensity. These findings are consistent with a scenario in which the luminous quasar at $z \sim4 $ resides in structures that are less massive than those expected for the progenitors of today's rich clusters of galaxies, and possibly that luminous quasars may be suppressing star formation in their close vicinity.
  • We study small-scale brightenings in Ca II 8542 \AA\ line-core images to determine their nature and effect on localized heating and mass transfer in active regions. High-resolution 2D spectroscopic observations of an active region in the Ca II 8542 \AA\ line were acquired with the GFPI attached to the 1.5-meter GREGOR telescope. Inversions of the spectra were carried out using NICOLE. We identified three brightenings of sizes up to 2"x2". We found evidence that the brightenings belonged to the footpoints of a microflare (MF). The properties of the observed brightenings disqualified the scenarios of Ellerman bombs or IRIS bombs. However, this MF shared some common properties with flaring active-region fibrils or flaring arch filaments (FAFs): (1) FAFs and MFs are both apparent in chromospheric and coronal layers according to the AIA channels, and (2) both show flaring arches with lifetimes of about 3.0-3.5 min and lengths of about 20". The inversions revealed heating by 600 K at the footpoint location in the ambient chromosphere during the impulsive phase. Connecting the footpoints, a dark filamentary structure appeared in the Ca II line-core images. Before the start of the MF, the spectra of this structure already indicated average blueshifts, meaning upward motions of the plasma along the LOS. During the impulsive phase, these velocities increased up to -2.2 km/s. Downflows dominated at the footpoints. However, in the upper photosphere, slight upflows occurred during the impulsive phase. Hence, bidirectional flows are present in the footpoints of the MF. Conclusions: We detected Ca II brightenings that coincided with the footpoint location of an MF. The MF event led to a rise of plasma in the upper photosphere, both before and during the impulsive phase. Excess mass, previously raised to at most chromospheric layers, slowly drained downward along arches toward the footpoints of the MF.
  • Electron energy loss spectra have been measured on hexagonal boron nitride single crystals employing a novel electron energy loss spectroscopic set-up composed by an electron microscope equipped with a monochromator and an in-column filter. This set-up provides high-quality energy-loss spectra and allows also for the imaging of energy-filtered diffraction patterns. These two acquisition modes provide complementary pieces of information, offering a global view of excitations in reciprocal space. As an example of the capabilities of the method we show how easily the core loss spectra at the $K$ edges of boron and nitrogen can be measured and imaged. Low losses associated to interband and/or plasmon excitations are also measured. This energy range allows us to illustrate that our method provides results of quality comparable to those obtained from non resonant X-ray inelastic scattering, but with advantageous specificities such as an enhanced sensitivity at low q and a much higher simplicity and versatility that makes it well adapted to the study of two-dimensional materials and related heterostructures. Finally, by comparing theoretical calculations against our measures, we are able to relate the range of applicability of ab initio calculations to the anisotropy of the sample and assess the level of approximation required for a proper simulation of our acquisition method.
  • To investigate the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, we performed near-infrared interferometric observations of the classical TTauri binary system S CrA. We present the first VLTI-GRAVITY high spectral resolution ($R\sim$4000) observations of a classical TTauri binary, S CrA (composed of S CrA N and S CrA S and separated by $\sim$1.4"), combining the four 8-m telescopes in dual-field mode. Our observations in the near-infrared K-band continuum reveal a disk around each binary component, with similar half-flux radii of about 0.1 au at d$\sim$130 pc, inclinations ($i=$28$\pm$3$^o$\ and $i=$22$\pm$6$^o$), and position angles (PA=0$^o\pm$6$^o$ and PA=-2$^o\pm$12$^o$), suggesting that they formed from the fragmentation of a common disk. The S CrA N spectrum shows bright HeI and Br$\gamma$ line emission exhibiting inverse P-Cygni profiles, typically associated with infalling gas. The continuum-compensated Br$\gamma$ line visibilities of S CrA N show the presence of a compact Br$\gamma$ emitting region the radius of which is about $\sim$0.06 au, which is twice as big as the truncation radius. This component is mostly tracing a wind. Moreover, a slight radius change between the blue- and red-shifted Br$\gamma$ line components is marginally detected. The presence of an inverse P-Cygni profile in the HeI and Br$\gamma$ lines, along with the tentative detection of a slightly larger size of the blue-shifted Br$\gamma$ line component, hint at the simultaneous presence of a wind and magnetospheric accretion in S CrA N.
  • We utilize near-infrared pump and mid-infrared probe spectroscopy to investigate the ultrafast electronic response of pressurized VO$_2$. Distinct pump-probe signals and a pumping threshold behavior are observed even in the pressure-induced metallic state showing a noticeable amount of localized electronic states. Our results are consistent with a scenario of a bandwidth-controlled Mott-Hubbard transition.
  • Aims. A large number of Calcium Infrared Triplet (IRT) spectra are expected from the GAIA- and CARMENES missions. Conversion of these spectra into known activity indicators will allow analysis of their temporal evolution to a better degree. We set out to find such a conversion formula and to determine its robustness. Methods. We have compared 2274 Ca II IRT spectra of active main-sequence F to K stars taken by the TIGRE telescope with those of inactive stars of the same spectral type. After normalizing and applying rotational broadening, we subtracted the comparison spectra to find the chromospheric excess flux caused by activity. We obtained the total excess flux, and compared it to established activity indices derived from the Ca II H & K lines, the spectra of which were obtained simultaneously to the infrared spectra. Results. The excess flux in the Ca II IRT is found to correlate well with $R_\mathrm{HK}'$ and $R_\mathrm{HK}^{+}$, as well as $S_\mathrm{MWO}$, if the $B-V$-dependency is taken into account. We find an empirical conversion formula to calculate the corresponding value of one activity indicator from the measurement of another, by comparing groups of datapoints of stars with similar B-V.
  • SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) is a beam dump experiment proposed at the CERN SPS aiming at the observation of long lived particles very weakly coupled with ordinary matter mostly produced in the decay of charmed hadrons. The beam dump facility of SHiP is also a copious factory of neutrinos of all three kinds and therefore a dedicated neutrino detector is foreseen in the SHiP apparatus. The neutrino detector exploits the Emulsion Cloud Chamber technique with a modular structure, alternating walls of target units and planes of electronic detectors providing the time stamp to the event. GEM detectors are one of the possible choices for this task. This paper reports the results of the first exposure to a muon beam at CERN of a new hybrid chamber, obtained by coupling a GEM chamber and an emulsion detector. Thanks to the micrometric accuracy of the emulsion detector, the position resolution of the GEM chamber as a function of the particle inclination was evaluated in two configurations, with and without the magnetic field
  • Nanostructured and architectured copper niobium composite wires are excellent candidates for the generation of intense pulsed magnetic fields (>90T) as they combine both high strength and high electrical conductivity. Multi-scaled Cu-Nb wires are fabricated by accumulative drawing and bundling (a severe plastic deformation technique), leading to a multiscale, architectured, and nanostructured microstructure exhibiting a strong fiber crystallographic texture and elongated grain shapes along the wire axis. This paper presents a comprehensive study of the effective elastic behavior of this composite material by three multi-scale models accounting for different microstructural contents: two mean-field models and a full-field finite element model. As the specimens exhibit many characteristic scales, several scale transition steps are carried out iteratively from the grain scale to the macro-scale. The general agreement among the model responses allows suggesting the best strategy to estimate the effective behavior of Cu-Nb wires and save computational time. The importance of crystallographical and morphological textures in various cases is discussed. Finally, the models are validated by available experimental data with a good agreement.
  • We report the realization of a bonded-bridge on-chip superconducting coil and its use in impedance-matching a highly ohmic quantum dot (QD) to a $\rm{3~GHz}$ measurement setup. The coil, modeled as a lumped-element $LC$ resonator, is more compact and has a wider bandwidth than resonators based on coplanar transmission lines (e.g. $\lambda/4$ impedance transformers and stub tuners) at potentially better signal-to-noise ratios. In particular for measurements of radiation emitted by the device, such as shot noise, the 50$\times$ larger bandwidth reduces the time to acquire the spectral density. The resonance frequency, close to 3.25 GHz, is three times higher than that of the one previously reported wire-bonded coil. As a proof of principle, we fabricated an $LC$ circuit that achieves impedance-matching to a $\rm{\sim 15~k\Omega}$ load and validate it with a load defined by a carbon nanotube QD of which we measure the shot noise in the Coulomb blockade regime.
  • This paper summarizes the results of experiments on electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements at the fundamental harmonic recently performed at the axially symmetric magnetic mirror device GDT (Budker Institute, Novosibirsk). New ECE diagnostics is installed to facilitate the successful electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment and operates in the vicinity of the heating frequency of 54.5 GHz. Besides expected emission of thermal electrons, a clearly resolved non-thermal ECE is observed indicating the presence of suprathermal electrons driven by high-power microwave heating. The particulars of plasma emission are studied experimentally in a broad range of discharge scenarios.
  • The origin of fluorine is a widely debated issue. Nevertheless, the ^{15}N({\alpha},{\gamma})^{19}F reaction is a common feature among the various production channels so far proposed. Its reaction rate at relevant temperatures is determined by a number of narrow resonances together with the DC component and the tails of the two broad resonances at E_{c.m.} = 1323 and 1487 keV. Measurement through the direct detection of the 19F recoil ions with the European Recoil separator for Nuclear Astrophysics (ERNA) were performed. The reaction was initiated by a 15N beam impinging onto a 4He windowless gas target. The observed yield of the resonances at Ec.m. = 1323 and 1487 keV is used to determine their widths in the {\alpha} and {\gamma} channels. We show that a direct measurement of the cross section of the ^{15}N({\alpha},{\gamma})^{19}F reaction can be successfully obtained with the Recoil Separator ERNA, and the widths {\Gamma}_{\gamma} and {\Gamma}_{\alpha} of the two broad resonances have been determined. While a fair agreement is found with earlier determination of the widths of the 1487 keV resonance, a significant difference is found for the 1323 keV resonance {\Gamma}_{\alpha} . The revision of the widths of the two more relevant broad resonances in the 15N({\alpha},{\gamma})19F reaction presented in this work is the first step toward a more firm determination of the reaction rate. At present, the residual uncertainty at the temperatures of the ^{19}F stellar nucleosynthesis is dominated by the uncertainties affecting the Direct Capture component and the 364 keV narrow resonance, both so far investigated only through indirect experiments.
  • Sirius, the seventh-nearest stellar system, is a visual binary containing the metallic-line A1 V star Sirius A, brightest star in the sky, orbited in a 50.13-year period by Sirius B, the brightest and nearest white dwarf (WD). Using images obtained over nearly two decades with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), along with photographic observations covering almost 20 years, and nearly 2300 historical measurements dating back to the 19th century, we determine precise orbital elements for the visual binary. Combined with the parallax and the motion of the A component, these elements yield dynamical masses of 2.063+/-0.023 Msun and 1.018+/-0.011 Msun for Sirius A and B, respectively. Our precise HST astrometry rules out third bodies orbiting either star in the system, down to masses of ~15-25 Mjup. The location of Sirius B in the H-R diagram is in excellent agreement with theoretical cooling tracks for WDs of its dynamical mass, and implies a cooling age of ~126 Myr. The position of Sirius B in the mass-radius plane is also consistent with WD theory, assuming a carbon-oxygen core. Including the pre-WD evolutionary timescale of the assumed progenitor, the total age of Sirius B is about 228+/-10 Myr. We calculated evolutionary tracks for stars with the dynamical mass of Sirius A, using two independent codes. We find it necessary to assume a slightly sub-solar metallicity, of about 0.85 Zsun, to fit its location in the luminosity-radius plane. The age of Sirius A based on these models is about 237-247 Myr, with uncertainties of +/-15 Myr, consistent with that of the WD companion. We discuss astrophysical puzzles presented by the Sirius system, including the probability that the two stars must have interacted in the past, even though there is no direct evidence for this, and the orbital eccentricity remains high.
  • A simple but novel driver system has been developed to operate the wire gating grid of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC). This system connects the wires of the gating grid to its driver via low impedance transmission lines. When the gating grid is open, all wires have the same voltage allowing drift electrons, produced by the ionization of the detector gas molecules, to pass through to the anode wires. When the grid is closed, the wires have alternating higher and lower voltages causing the drift electrons to terminate at the more positive wires. Rapid opening of the gating grid with low pickup noise is achieved by quickly shorting the positive and negative wires to attain the average bias potential with N-type and P-type MOSFET switches. The circuit analysis and simulation software SPICE shows that the driver restores the gating grid voltage to 90% of the opening voltage in less than 0.20 $\mu$s. When tested in the experimental environment of a time projection chamber larger termination resistors were chosen so that the driver opens the gating grid in 0.35 $\mu$s. In each case, opening time is basically characterized by the RC constant given by the resistance of the switches and terminating resistors and the capacitance of the gating grid and its transmission line. By adding a second pair of N-type and P-type MOSFET switches, the gating grid is closed by restoring 99% of the original charges to the wires within 3 $\mu$s.
  • The spin of a planet or brown dwarf is related to the accretion process, and therefore studying spin can help promote our understanding of the formation of such objects. We present the projected rotational velocity of the young sub-stellar companion GQ Lupi b, along with its barycentric radial velocity. The directly imaged exoplanet or brown dwarf companion joins a small but growing ensemble of wide-orbit sub-stellar companions with a spin measurement. The GQ Lupi system was observed at high spectral resolution (R ~ 100000), and in the analysis we made use of both spectral and spatial filtering to separate the signal of the companion from that of the host star. We detect both CO (S/N=11.6) and H2O (S/N=7.7) in the atmosphere of GQ Lupi b by cross-correlating with model spectra, and we find it to be a slow rotator with a projected rotational velocity of $5.3^{+0.9}_{-1.0}$ km/s. The slow rotation is most likely due to its young age of < 5 Myr, as it is still in the process of accreting material and angular momentum. We measure the barycentric radial velocity of GQ Lupi b to be $2.0 \pm 0.4$ km/s, and discuss the allowed orbital configurations and their implications for formation scenarios for GQ Lupi b.
  • April 7, 2015 physics.ins-det, astro-ph.IM
    The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking from November 2007 till February 2013 at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory (4300 m a.s.l.). The detector consists of a single layer of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) ( about 6700 m^2}) operated in streamer mode. The signal pick-up is obtained by means of strips facing one side of the gas volume. The digital readout of the signals, while allows a high space-time resolution in the shower front reconstruction, limits the measurable energy to a few hundred TeV. In order to fully investigate the 1-10 PeV region, an analog readout has been implemented by instrumenting each RPC with two large size electrodes facing the other side of the gas volume. Since December 2009 the RPC charge readout has been in operation on the entire central carpet (about 5800 m^2). In this configuration the detector is able to measure the particle density at the core position where it ranges from tens to many thousands of particles per m^2. Thus ARGO-YBJ provides a highly detailed image of the charge component at the core of air showers. In this paper we describe the analog readout of RPCs in ARGO-YBJ and discuss both the performance of the system and the physical impact on the EAS measurements.
  • In this study, we demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that the charge transport mechanism in amorphous Hf$_{0.5}$Zr$_{0.5}$O$_2$ is phonon-assisted tunneling between traps like in HfO$_2$ and ZrO$_2$. The thermal trap energy of 1.25 eV and optical trap energy of 2.5 eV in Hf$_{0.5}$Zr$_{0.5}$O$_2$ were determined based on comparison of experimental data on transport with different theories of charge transfer in dielectrics. A hypothesis that oxygen vacancies are responsible for the charge transport in Hf$_{0.5}$Zr$_{0.5}$O$_2$ was discussed.
  • We combine cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with analytic models to evaluate the role of galaxy-scale gravitational torques on the evolution of massive black holes at the centers of star-forming galaxies. We confirm and extend our earlier results to show that torque-limited growth yields black holes and host galaxies evolving on average along the Mbh-Mbulge relation from early times down to z = 0 and that convergence onto the scaling relation occurs independent of the initial conditions and with no need for mass averaging through mergers or additional self-regulation processes. Smooth accretion dominates the long-term evolution, with black hole mergers with mass ratios >1:5 representing typically a small fraction of the total growth. Winds from the accretion disk are required to eject significant mass to suppress black hole growth, but there is no need for coupling this wind to galactic-scale gas to regulate black holes in a non-linear feedback loop. Torque-limited growth yields a close-to-linear relation for the star formation rate and the black hole accretion rate averaged over galaxy evolution time scales. However, the SFR-AGN connection has significant scatter owing to strong variability of black hole accretion at all resolved time scales. Eddington ratios can be described by a broad lognormal distribution with median value evolving roughly as (1 + z)^1.9, suggesting a main sequence for black hole growth similar to the cosmic evolution of specific SFRs. Our results offer an attractive scenario consistent with available observations in which cosmological gas infall and transport of angular momentum in the galaxy by gravitational instabilities regulate the long-term co-evolution of black holes and star-forming galaxies.
  • A novel dynamic model-based trajectory tracking control law is proposed for a four-wheel differentially driven mobile robot using a backstepping technique that guarantees the Lyapunov stability. The present work improves the work of Caracciolo et al. (ICRA 1999), a dynamic feedback linearization approach, by reducing the number of required assumptions and the number of state terms. We also thoroughly investigate on a gain tuning procedure which is often overlooked for nonlinear controllers. Finally, the performance of the proposed controller is compared with the dynamic feedback linearization approach via simulation results which indicate that our controller is robust even in the presence of measurement noise and control time delay.