• Context. Observations of molecular gas have played a key role in developing the current understanding of the late stages of stellar evolution. Aims. The survey Planetary nebulae AND their cO Reservoir with APEX (PANDORA) was designed to study the circumstellar shells of evolved stars with the aim to estimate their physical parameters. Methods. Millimetre carbon monoxide (CO) emission is the most useful probe of the warm molecular component ejected by low- to intermediate-mass stars. CO is the second-most abundant molecule in the Universe, and the millimeter transitions are easily excited, thus making it particularly useful to study the mass, structure, and kinematics of the molecular gas. We present a large survey of the CO (J = 3 - 2) line using the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope in a sample of 93 proto-planetary nebulae and planetary nebulae. Results. CO (J = 3 - 2) was detected in 21 of the 93 objects. Conclusions. CO (J = 3 - 2) was detected in all 4 observed pPNe (100%), 15 of the 75 PNe (20%), one of the 4 wide binaries (25%), and in 1 of the 10 close binaries (10%). Using the CO (J = 3 - 2) line, we estimated the column density and mass of each source.
  • A catalogue of 239 ultra-compact HII regions (UCHIIs) found in the CORNISH survey at 5 GHz and 1.5" resolution in the region $10^{\circ} < l < 65^{\circ}, ~|b| < 1^{\circ}$ is presented. This is the largest complete and well-selected sample of UCHIIs to date and provides the opportunity to explore the global and individual properties of this key state in massive star formation at multiple wavelengths. The nature of the candidates was validated, based on observational properties and calculated spectral indices, and the analysis is presented in this work. The physical sizes, luminosities and other physical properties were computed by utilising literature distances or calculating the distances whenever a value was not available. The near- and mid-infrared extended source fluxes were measured and the extinctions towards the UCHIIs were computed. The new results were combined with available data at longer wavelengths and the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) were reconstructed for 177 UCHIIs. The bolometric luminosities obtained from SED fitting are presented. By comparing the radio flux densities to previous observational epochs, we find about 5% of the sources appear to be time variable. This first high-resolution area survey of the Galactic plane shows that the total number of UCHIIs in the Galaxy is ~ 750 - a factor of 3-4 fewer than found in previous large area radio surveys. It will form the basis for future tests of models of massive star formation.
  • The survey for DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer (DUSTiNGS) identified several candidate Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars in nearby dwarf galaxies and showed that dust can form even in very metal-poor systems (Z ~ 0.008 $Z_\odot$). Here, we present a follow-up survey with WFC3/IR on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), using filters that are capable of distinguishing carbon-rich (C-type) stars from oxygen-rich (M-type) stars: F127M, F139M, and F153M. We include six star-forming DUSTiNGS galaxies (NGC 147, IC 10, Pegasus dIrr, Sextans B, Sextans A, and Sag DIG), all more metal-poor than the Magellanic Clouds and spanning 1 dex in metallicity. We double the number of dusty AGB stars known in these galaxies and find that most are carbon rich. We also find 26 dusty M-type stars, mostly in IC 10. Given the large dust excess and tight spatial distribution of these M-type stars, they are most likely on the upper end of the AGB mass range (stars undergoing Hot Bottom Burning). Theoretical models do not predict significant dust production in metal-poor M-type stars, but we see evidence for dust excess around M-type stars even in the most metal-poor galaxies in our sample (12+log(O/H) = 7.26-7.50). The low metallicities and inferred high stellar masses (up to ~10 $M_\odot$) suggest that AGB stars can produce dust very early in the evolution of galaxies (~30 Myr after they form), and may contribute significantly to the dust reservoirs seen in high-redshift galaxies.
  • The Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the {\em Spitzer Space Telescope} observed nearly 800 point sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), taking over 1,000 spectra. 197 of these targets were observed as part of the Sage-Spec Spitzer Legacy program; the remainder are from a variety of different calibration, guaranteed time and open time projects. We classify these point sources into types according to their infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership, and variability information, using a decision-tree classification method. We then refine the classification using supplementary information from the astrophysical literature. We find that our IRS sample is comprised substantially of YSO and H\,{\sc ii} regions, post-Main Sequence low-mass stars: (post-)AGB stars and planetary nebulae and massive stars including several rare evolutionary types. Two supernova remnants, a nova and several background galaxies were also observed. We use these classifications to improve our understanding of the stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud, study the composition and characteristics of dust species in a variety of LMC objects, and to verify the photometric classification methods used by mid-IR surveys. We discover that some widely-used catalogues of objects contain considerable contamination and others are missing sources in our sample.
  • V4334 Sgr (a.k.a. Sakurai's object) is the central star of an old planetary nebula that underwent a very late thermal pulse a few years before its discovery in 1996. We have been monitoring the evolution of the optical emission line spectrum since 2001. The goal is to improve the evolutionary models by constraining them with the temporal evolution of the central star temperature. In addition the high resolution spectral observations obtained by X-shooter and ALMA show the temporal evolution of the different morphological components.
  • Extremely high velocity emission likely related to jets is known to occur in some proto-Planetary Nebulae. However, the molecular complexity of this kinematic component is largely unknown. We observed the known extreme outflow from the proto-Planetary Nebula IRAS 16342-3814, a prototype water fountain, in the full frequency range from 73 to 111 GHz with the RSR receiver on the Large Millimetre Telescope. We detected the molecules SiO, HCN, SO, and $^{13}$CO. All molecular transitions, with the exception of the latter are detected for the first time in this source, and all present emission with velocities up to a few hundred km s$^{-1}$. IRAS 16342-3814 is therefore the only source of this kind presenting extreme outflow activity simultaneously in all these molecules, with SO and SiO emission showing the highest velocities found of these species in proto-Planetary Nebulae. To be confirmed is a tentative weak SO component with a FWHM $\sim$ 700 km s$^{-1}$. The extreme outflow gas consists of dense gas (n$_{\rm H_2} >$ 10$^{4.8}$--10$^{5.7}$ cm$^{-3}$), with a mass larger than $\sim$ 0.02--0.15 M$_{\odot}$. The relatively high abundances of SiO and SO may be an indication of an oxygen-rich extreme high velocity gas.
  • The detection and study of molecular gas in born-again stars would be of great importance to understand their composition and chemical evolution. In addition, the molecular emission would be an invaluable tool to explore the physical conditions, kinematics and formation of asymmetric structures in the circumstellar envelopes of these evolved stars. However, until now, all attempts to detect molecular emission from the cool material around born-again stars have failed. We carried out observations using the APEX and IRAM 30m telescopes to search for molecular emission toward four well studied born-again stars, V4334 Sgr, V605 Aql, A30 and A78, that are thought to represent an evolutionary sequence. We detected for the first time emission from HCN and H$^{13}$CN molecules toward V4334 Sgr, and CO emission in V605 Aql. No molecular emission was detected above the noise level toward A30 and A78. A first estimate of the H$^{12}$CN/H$^{13}$CN abundance ratio in the circumstellar environment of V4334 Sgr is $\approx$3, which is similar to the value of the $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratio measured from other observations. We derived a rotational temperature of $T_{\rm rot}$=13$\pm1$ K, and a total column density of $N_{{\rm HCN}}$=1.6$\pm0.1\times$10$^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ for V4334 Sgr. This result sets a lower limit on the amount of hydrogen that was ejected into the wind during the born-again event of this source. For V605 Aql, we obtained a lower limit for the integrated line intensities $I_{^{12}\rm C}$/$I_{^{13}\rm C}$>4.
  • Context: Low- and intermediate-mass stars lose most of their stellar mass at the end of their lives on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Determining gas and dust mass-loss rates (MLRs) is important in quantifying the contribution of evolved stars to the enrichment of the interstellar medium. Aims: Attempt to, for the first time, spectrally resolve CO thermal line emission in a small sample of AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods: ALMA was used to observe 2 OH/IR stars and 4 carbon stars in the LMC in the CO J= 2-1 line. Results: We present the first measurement of expansion velocities in extragalactic carbon stars. All four C-stars are detected and wind expansion velocities and stellar velocities are directly measured. Mass-loss rates are derived from modelling the spectral energy distribution and Spitzer/IRS spectrum with the DUSTY code. Gas-to-dust ratios are derived that make the predicted velocities agree with the observed ones. The expansion velocities and MLRs are compared to a Galactic sample of well-studied relatively low MLRs stars supplemented with "extreme" C-stars that have properties more similar to the LMC targets. Gas MLRs derived from a simple formula are significantly smaller than derived from the dust modelling, indicating an order of magnitude underestimate of the estimated CO abundance, time-variable mass loss, or that the CO intensities in LMC stars are lower than predicted by the formula derived for Galactic objects. This could be related to a stronger interstellar radiation field in the LMC. Conclusions: Although the LMC sample is small and the comparison to Galactic stars is non-trivial because of uncertainties in their distances it appears that for C stars the wind expansion velocities in the LMC are lower than in the solar neighbourhood, while the MLRs appear similar. This is in agreement with dynamical dust-driven wind models.
  • For 32 central stars of PNe we present their parameters interpolated among the new evolutionary sequences. The derived stellar final masses are confined between 0.53 and 0.58 $M_\odot$ in good agreement with the peak in the white dwarf mass distribution. Consequently, the inferred star formation history of the Galactic bulge is well restricted between 3 and 11 Gyr and is compatible with other published studies. The new evolutionary tracks proved a very good as a tool for analysis of late stages of stars life. The result provide a compelling confirmation of the accelerated post-AGB evolution.
  • The $^3$He isotope is important to many fields of astrophysics, including stellar evolution, chemical evolution, and cosmology. The isotope is produced in low-mass stars which evolve through the planetary nebula (PN) phase. $^3$He abundances in PNe can help test models of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. We present the detection of the $^3$He$^+$ emission line using the single dish Deep Space Station 63, towards the PN IC$\,$418. We derived a $^3$He/H abundance in the range 1.74$\pm$0.8$\times$10$^{-3}$ to 5.8$\pm$1.7$\times$10$^{-3}$, depending on whether part of the line arises in an outer ionized halo. The lower value for $^3$He/H ratio approaches values predicted by stellar models which include thermohaline mixing, but requires that large amounts of $^3$He are produced inside low-mass stars which enrich the interstellar medium (ISM). However, this over-predicts the $^3$He abundance in HII regions, the ISM, and proto-solar grains, which is known to be of the order of 10$^{-5}$. This discrepancy questions our understanding of the evolution of the $^3$He, from circumstellar environments to the ISM.
  • We explore the wind-driving mechanism of giant stars through the nearby (117 pc), intermediate-luminosity ($L \approx 1600$ L$_\odot$) star EU Del (HIP 101810, HD 196610). APEX observations of the CO (3--2) and (2--1) transitions are used to derive a wind velocity of 9.51 $\pm$ 0.02 km s$^{-1}$, a $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratio of 14 $^{+9}_{-4}$, and a mass-loss rate of a few $\times$ 10$^{-8}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. From published spectra, we estimate that the star has a metallicity of [Fe/H] = --0.27 $\pm$ $\sim$0.30 dex. The star's dusty envelope lacks a clear 10-$\mu$m silicate feature, despite the star's oxygen-rich nature. Radiative transfer modelling cannot fit a wind acceleration model which relies solely on radiation pressure on condensing dust. We compare our results to VY Leo (HIP 53449), a star with similar temperature and luminosity, but different pulsation properties. We suggest the much stronger mass loss from EU Del may be driven by long-period stellar pulsations, due to its potentially lower mass. We explore the implications for the mass-loss rate and wind velocities of other stars.
  • We apply an axially symmetric pseudo-3D photoionization model, pyCloudy, to derive the structures of 6 bipolar nebulae and 2 suggested post-bipolars in a quest to constrain the bipolar planetary nebulae evolution. HST images and VLT/UVES spectroscopy are used for the modelling. The targets are located in the direction of the Galactic bulge. A 3D model structure is used as input to the photoionization code, so as to fit the HST images. Line profiles of different ions constrain the velocity field. The model and associated velocity fields allow us to derive masses, velocities, and ages. The 3D models find much lower ionized masses than required in 1D models: ionized masses are reduced by factors of 2-7. The selected bi-lobed planetary nebulae show a narrow range of ages: the averaged radii and velocities result in values between 1300 and 2000 yr. The lobes are fitted well with velocities linearly increasing with radius. These Hubble-type flows have been found before, and suggest that the lobes form at a defined point in time. The lobes appear to be slightly younger than the main (host) nebulae, by ~500 yr, they seem to form at an early phase of PN evolution, and fade after 1-2 kyr. We find that 30-35% of bulge PNe pass through a bipolar phase.
  • The Magellanic clouds are uniquely placed to study the stellar contribution to dust emission. Individual stars can be resolved in these systems even in the mid-infrared, and they are close enough to allow detection of infrared excess caused by dust.We have searched the Spitzer Space Telescope data archive for all Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) staring-mode observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and found that 209 Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) point sources within the footprint of the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-SMC) Spitzer Legacy programme were targeted, within a total of 311 staring mode observations. We classify these point sources using a decision tree method of object classification, based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership and variability information. We find 58 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 51 young stellar objects (YSOs), 4 post-AGB objects, 22 Red Supergiants (RSGs), 27 stars (of which 23 are dusty OB stars), 24 planetary nebulae (PNe), 10Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, 3 Hii regions, 3 R Coronae Borealis (R CrB) stars, 1 Blue Supergiant and 6 other objects, including 2 foreground AGB stars. We use these classifications to evaluate the success of photometric classification methods reported in the literature.
  • During the late stages of their evolution, Sun-like stars bring the products of nuclear burning to the surface. Most of the carbon in the Universe is believed to originate from stars with masses up to a few solar masses. Although there is a chemical dichotomy between oxygen-rich and carbon-rich evolved stars, the dredge-up itself has never been directly observed. In the last three decades, however, a few stars have been shown to display both carbon- and oxygen-rich material in their circumstellar envelopes. Two models have been proposed to explain this dual chemistry: one postulates that a recent dredge-up of carbon produced by nucleosynthesis inside the star during the Asymptotic Giant Branch changed the surface chemistry of the star. The other model postulates that oxygen-rich material exists in stable keplerian rotation around the central star. The two models make contradictory, testable, predictions on the location of the oxygen-rich material, either located further from the star than the carbon-rich gas, or very close to the star in a stable disk. Using the Faint Object InfraRed CAmera (FORCAST) instrument on board the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Telescope, we obtained images of the carbon-rich planetary nebula (PN) BD+30 3639 which trace both carbon-rich polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygen-rich silicate dust. With the superior spectral coverage of SOFIA, and using a 3D photoionisation and dust radiative transfer model we prove that the O-rich material is distributed in a shell in the outer parts of the nebula, while the C-rich material is located in the inner parts of the nebula. These observations combined with the model, suggest a recent change in stellar surface composition for the double chemistry in this object. This is evidence for dredge-up occurring ~1000yr ago.
  • Through CO mm-line and optical spectroscopy, we investigate the properties of the Fried Egg nebula IRAS 17163-3907, which has recently been proposed to be one of the rare members of the yellow hypergiant class. The CO J=2-1 and J=3-2 emission arises from a region within 20" of the star and is clearly associated with the circumstellar material. The CO lines show a multi-component asymmetrical profile, and an unexpected velocity gradient is resolved in the east-west direction, suggesting a bipolar outflow. This is in contrast with the apparent symmetry of the dust envelope as observed in the infrared. The optical spectrum of IRAS 17163-3907 between 5100 and 9000 {\AA} was compared with that of the archetypal yellow hypergiant IRC+10420 and was found to be very similar. These results build on previous evidence that IRAS 17163-3907 is a yellow hypergiant.
  • We examine the relation between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 microns and far-infrared emission from hot dust grains at 24 microns and from large dust grains at 160 and 250 microns in the nearby spiral galaxies NGC 2403 and M83 using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory. We find that the PAH emission in NGC 2403 is better correlated with emission at 250 microns from dust heated by the diffuse interstellar radiation field (ISRF) and that the 8/250 micron surface brightness ratio is well-correlated with the stellar surface brightness as measured at 3.6 microns. This implies that the PAHs in NGC 2403 are intermixed with cold large dust grains in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and that the PAHs are excited by the diffuse ISRF. In M83, the PAH emission appears more strongly correlated with 160 micron emission originating from large dust grains heated by star forming regions. However, the PAH emission in M83 is low where the 24 micron emission peaks within star forming regions, and enhancements in the 8/160 micron surface brightness ratios appear offset relative to the dust and the star forming regions within the spiral arms. This suggests that the PAHs observed in the 8 micron band are not excited locally within star forming regions but either by light escaping non-axisymmetrically from star forming regions or locally by young, non-photoionising stars that have migrated downstream from the spiral density waves. The results from just these two galaxies show that PAHs may be excited by different stellar populations in different spiral galaxies.
  • We investigate the population of cool, evolved stars in the Local Group dwarf elliptical galaxy M32, using Infrared Array Camera observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We construct deep mid-infrared colour-magnitude diagrams for the resolved stellar populations within 3.5 arcmin of M32's centre, and identify those stars that exhibit infrared excess. Our data is dominated by a population of luminous, dust-producing stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and extend to approximately 3 mag below the AGB tip. We detect for the first time a sizeable population of `extreme' AGB stars, highly enshrouded by circumstellar dust and likely completely obscured at optical wavelengths. The total dust-injection rate from the extreme AGB candidates is measured to be $7.5 \times 10^{-7}$ ${\rm M}_{\odot} \, {\rm yr}^{-1}$, corresponding to a gas mass-loss rate of $1.5 \times 10^{-4}$ ${\rm M}_{\odot} \, {\rm yr}^{-1}$. These extreme stars may be indicative of an extended star-formation epoch between 0.2 and 5 Gyr ago.
  • The INT/WFC Photometric H-Alpha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS) is a 1800 square degrees imaging survey covering Galactic latitudes |b| < 5 deg and longitudes l = 30 to 215 deg in the r, i and H-alpha filters using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5-metre Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) in La Palma. We present the first quality-controlled and globally-calibrated source catalogue derived from the survey, providing single-epoch photometry for 219 million unique sources across 92% of the footprint. The observations were carried out between 2003 and 2012 at a median seeing of 1.1 arcsec (sampled at 0.33 arcsec/pixel) and to a mean 5\sigma-depth of 21.2 (r), 20.0 (i) and 20.3 (H-alpha) in the Vega magnitude system. We explain the data reduction and quality control procedures, describe and test the global re-calibration, and detail the construction of the new catalogue. We show that the new calibration is accurate to 0.03 mag (rms) and recommend a series of quality criteria to select the most reliable data from the catalogue. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of the catalogue's unique (r-Halpha, r-i) diagram to (1) characterise stellar populations and extinction regimes towards different Galactic sightlines and (2) select H-alpha emission-line objects. IPHAS is the first survey to offer comprehensive CCD photometry of point sources across the Galactic Plane at visible wavelengths, providing the much-needed counterpart to recent infrared surveys.
  • Aims: We present the first in-depth study of the kinematic properties and derive the structural parameters of NGC 4372 based on the fit of a Plummer profile and a rotating, physical model. We explore the link between internal rotation to different cluster properties and together with similar studies of more GCs, we put these in the context of globular cluster formation and evolution. Methods: We present radial velocities for 131 cluster member stars measured from high-resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE observations. Their membership to the GC is additionally confirmed from precise metallicity estimates. Using this kinematic data set we build a velocity dispersion profile and a systemic rotation curve. Additionally, we obtain an elliptical number density profile of NGC 4372 based on optical images using a MCMC fitting algorithm. From this we derive the cluster's half-light radius and ellipticity as r_h=3.4'+/-0.04' and e=0.08+/-0.01. Finally, we give a physical interpretation of the observed morphological and kinematic properties of this GC by fitting an axisymmetric, differentially rotating, dynamical model. Results: Our results show that NGC 4372 has an unusually high ratio of rotation amplitude to velocity dispersion (1.2 vs. 4.5 km/s) for its metallicity. This, however, puts it in line with two other exceptional, very metal-poor GCs - M 15 and NGC 4590. We also find a mild flattening of NGC 4372 in the direction of its rotation. Given its old age, this suggests that the flattening is indeed caused by the systemic rotation rather than tidal interactions with the Galaxy. Additionally, we estimate the dynamical mass of the GC M_dyn=2.0+/-0.5 x 10^5 M_Sun based on the dynamical model, which constrains the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 4372 between 1.4 and 2.3 M_Sun/L_Sun, representative of an old, purely stellar population.
  • We report the first detections of OH$^+$ emission in planetary nebulae (PNe). As part of an imaging and spectroscopy survey of 11 PNe in the far-IR using the PACS and SPIRE instruments aboard the Herschel Space Observatory, we performed a line survey in these PNe over the entire spectral range between 51 and 672$\mu$m to look for new detections. OH$^+$ rotational emission lines at 152.99, 290.20, 308.48, and 329.77$\mu$m were detected in the spectra of three planetary nebulae: NGC 6445, NGC 6720, and NGC 6781. Excitation temperatures and column densities derived from these lines are in the range of 27 to 47 K and 2$\times$10$^{10}$ to 4 $\times$10$^{11}$ cm$^{-2}$, respectively. In PNe, the OH+ rotational line emission appears to be produced in the photodissociation region (PDR) in these objects. The emission of OH+ is observed only in PNe with hot central stars (T$_{eff}$ > 100000 K), suggesting that high-energy photons may play a role in the OH+ formation and its line excitation in these objects, as it seems to be the case for ultraluminous galaxies.
  • We analysed the planetary nebula Hen 2-260 using optical spectroscopy and photometry. We compared our observations with the data from literature to search for evolutionary changes. The nebular line fluxes were modelled with the Cloudy photoionization code to derive the stellar and nebular parameters. The planetary nebula shows a complex structure and possibly a bipolar outflow. The nebula is relatively dense and young. The central star is just starting $\rm O^+$ ionization ($\rm T_{eff} \approx 30,000 \, K$). Comparison of our observations with literature data indicates a 50% increase of the [OIII] 5007 \AA\ line flux between 2001 and 2012. We interpret it as the result of the progression of the ionization of $\rm O^{+}$. The central star evolves to higher temperatures at a rate of $\rm 45 \pm 7\,K\, yr^{-1}$. The heating rate is consistent with a final mass of $\rm 0.626 ^{+0.003}_{-0.005} \, M_{\odot}$ or $\rm 0.645 ^{+0.008}_{-0.008} \, M_{\odot}$ for two different sets of post-AGB evolutionary tracks from literature. The photometric monitoring of Hen 2-260 revealed variations on a timescale of hours or days. The variability may be caused by pulsations of the star. The temperature evolution of the central star can be traced using spectroscopic observations of the surrounding planetary nebula spanning a timescale of roughly a decade. This allows us to precisely determine the stellar mass, since the pace of the temperature evolution depends critically on the core mass. The kinematical age of the nebula is consistent with the age obtained from the evolutionary track. The final mass of the central star is close to the mass distribution peak for central stars of planetary nebulae found in other studies. The object belongs to a group of young central stars of planetary nebulae showing photometric variability.
  • We study the star-formation history of the Galactic bulge, as derived from the age distribution of the central stars of planetary nebulae that belong to this stellar population. The high resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations of 31 compact planetary nebulae are used to derive their central star masses. The Bloecker tracks with the cluster IFMR result in ages, which are unexpectedly young. We find that the Bloecker post-AGB tracks need to be accelerated by a factor of three to fit the local white dwarf masses. This acceleration extends the age distribution. We adjust the IFMR as a free parameter to map the central star ages on the full age range of bulge stellar populations. This fit requires a steeper IFMR than the cluster relation. We find a star-formation rate in the Galactic bulge, which is approximately constant between 3 and 10 Gyr ago. The result indicates that planetary nebulae are mainly associated with the younger and more metal-rich bulge populations. The constant rate of star-formation between 3 and 10 Gyr agrees with suggestions that the metal-rich component of the bulge is formed during an extended process, such as a bar interaction.
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been observed in O-rich planetary nebulae towards the Galactic Bulge. This combination of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich material, known as dual-dust or mixed chemistry, is not expected to be seen around such objects. We recently proposed that PAHs could be formed from the photodissociation of CO in dense tori. In this work, using VISIR/VLT, we spatially resolved the emission of the PAH bands and ionised emission from the [SIV] line, confirming the presence of dense central tori in all the observed O-rich objects. Furthermore, we show that for most of the objects, PAHs are located at the outer edge of these dense/compact tori, while the ionised material is mostly present in the inner parts of these tori, consistent with our hypothesis for the formation of PAHs in these systems. The presence of a dense torus has been strongly associated with the action of a central binary star and, as such, the rich chemistry seen in these regions may also be related to the formation of exoplanets in post-common-envelope binary systems.
  • The VST Photometric Halpha Survey of the Southern Galactic Plane and Bulge (VPHAS+) is surveying the southern Milky Way in u, g, r, i and Halpha at 1 arcsec angular resolution. Its footprint spans the Galactic latitude range -5 < b < +5 at all longitudes south of the celestial equator. Extensions around the Galactic Centre to Galactic latitudes +/-10 bring in much of the Galactic Bulge. This ESO public survey, begun on 28th December 2011, reaches down to 20th magnitude (10-sigma) and will provide single-epoch digital optical photometry for around 300 million stars. The observing strategy and data pipelining is described, and an appraisal of the segmented narrowband Halpha filter in use is presented. Using model atmospheres and library spectra, we compute main-sequence (u - g), (g - r), (r - i) and (r - Halpha) stellar colours in the Vega system. We report on a preliminary validation of the photometry using test data obtained from two pointings overlapping the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. An example of the (u - g, g - r) and (r - Halpha, r - i) diagrams for a full VPHAS+ survey field is given. Attention is drawn to the opportunities for studies of compact nebulae and nebular morphologies that arise from the image quality being achieved. The value of the u band as the means to identify planetary-nebula central stars is demonstrated by the discovery of the central star of NGC 2899 in survey data. Thanks to its excellent imaging performance, the VST/OmegaCam combination used by this survey is a perfect vehicle for automated searches for reddened early-type stars, and will allow the discovery and analysis of compact binaries, white dwarfs and transient sources.
  • We have identified a new vibrational HCN maser at 89.087 GHz in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star IRAS 15082-4808, a maser which is thought to trace the innermost region of an AGB envelope. The observations of this maser at three epochs are presented: two positive detections and one null detection. The line profile has varied between the positive detections, as has the intensity of the maser. The major component of the maser is found to be offset by -2.0+/-0.9 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity of the envelope, as derived from the 88.631 GHz transition of HCN. Similar blueshifts are measured in the other 9 sources where this maser has been detected. Maser variability with pulsation phase has been investigated for the first time using the 10 stars now available. Comparisons with AGB model atmospheres constrain the position of the formation region of the maser to the region between the pulsation shocks and the onset of dust acceleration, between 2 and 4 stellar radii.