• We present the general behavior of the scalar sector in a Three Higgs Doublet Model (3HDM) with a $\mathbb{Z}_5$ flavor symmetry. There are regions of the parameters space where it is possible to get a SM-like Higgs boson with the other Higgs bosons being heavier, thus decoupled from the SM, and without relevant contributions to any flavor observables. There are however other more interesting regions of parameter space with a light charged Higgs ($m_{H^\pm} \sim $ 150 GeV) that are consistent with experimental results and whose phenomenological consequences could be interesting. We present a numerical analysis of the main $B$-physics constraints and show that the model can correctly describe the current experimental data.
  • We propose an alternative unification scenario where the Higgs self-coupling (lambda) is unified with the electroweak SU(2)L x U(1)Y interactions at an intermediate scale MGH, lower than the GUT scale. In this model the SM remains valid up to this scale MGH, where the gauge and Higgs couplings satisfy the unification condition g1 = g2 = f(lambda). Two variants for this unification condition are discussed; scenario I is defined through the linear relation: g1 = g2 = k lambda(MGH), while scenario II assumes a quadratic relation: g1**2 = g2**2 = k lambda(MGH). An attractive feature of this class of models is the possibility to determine the SM Higgs boson mass by evolving lambda back from MGH down to the electroweak scale; fixing k = O(1) we obtain a Higgs mass value mH approx. 200 GeV. Above MGH, the single coupling gH that describes the electroweak-Higgs interactions, keeps evolving until it unifies with the strong coupling constant. We discuss a realization o this unification scenario within the context of a six-dimensional SU(3)c x SU(3)w Gauge-Higgs unified model.
  • This report summarizes a study of the physics potential of the CLIC e+e- linear collider operating at centre-of-mass energies from 1 TeV to 5 TeV with luminosity of the order of 10^35 cm^-2 s^-1. First, the CLIC collider complex is surveyed, with emphasis on aspects related to its physics capabilities, particularly the luminosity and energy, and also possible polarization, \gamma\gamma and e-e- collisions. The next CLIC Test facility, CTF3, and its R&D programme are also reviewed. We then discuss aspects of experimentation at CLIC, including backgrounds and experimental conditions, and present a conceptual detector design used in the physics analyses, most of which use the nominal CLIC centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. CLIC contributions to Higgs physics could include completing the profile of a light Higgs boson by measuring rare decays and reconstructing the Higgs potential, or discovering one or more heavy Higgs bosons, or probing CP violation in the Higgs sector. Turning to physics beyond the Standard Model, CLIC might be able to complete the supersymmetric spectrum and make more precise measurements of sparticles detected previously at the LHC or a lower-energy linear e+e- collider: \gamma\gamma collisions and polarization would be particularly useful for these tasks. CLIC would also have unique capabilities for probing other possible extensions of the Standard Model, such as theories with extra dimensions or new vector resonances, new contact interactions and models with strong WW scattering at high energies. In all the scenarios we have studied, CLIC would provide significant fundamental physics information beyond that available from the LHC and a lower-energy linear e+e- collider, as a result of its unique combination of high energy and experimental precision.
  • The work contained herein constitutes a report of the ``Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop "Physics at TeV Colliders", Les Houches, France, 26 May--6 June, 2003. The research presented is original, and was performed specifically for the workshop. Tools for calculations in the minimal supersymmetric standard model are presented, including a comparison of the dark matter relic density predicted by public codes. Reconstruction of supersymmetric particle masses at the LHC and a future linear collider facility is examined. Less orthodox supersymmetric signals such as non-pointing photons and R-parity violating signals are studied. Features of extra dimensional models are examined next, including measurement strategies for radions and Higgs', as well as the virtual effects of Kaluza Klein modes of gluons. An LHC search strategy for a heavy top found in many little Higgs model is presented and finally, there is an update on LHC $Z'$ studies.
  • Electroweak precision measurements indicate that the standard model Higgs boson is light and that it could have already been discovered at LEP 2, or might be found at the Tevatron Run 2. In the context of a TeV^-1 size extra dimensional model, we argue that the Higgs boson production rates at LEP and the Tevatron are suppressed, while they might be enhanced at the LHC or at CLIC. This is due to the possible mixing between brane and bulk components of the Higgs boson, that is, the non-trivial brane-bulk `location' of the lightest Higgs. To parametrize this mixing, we consider two Higgs doublets, one confined to the usual space dimensions and the other propagating in the bulk. Calculating the production and decay rates for the lightest Higgs boson, we find that compared to the standard model (SM), the cross section receives a suppression well below but an enhancement close to and above the compactification scale M_c. This impacts the discovery of the lightest (SM like) Higgs boson at colliders. To find a Higgs signal in this model at the Tevatron Run 2 or at the LC with sqrt(s)=1.5 TeV, a higher luminosity would be required than in the SM case. Meanwhile, at the LHC or at CLIC with sqrt(s) ~ 3-5 TeV one might find highly enhanced production rates. This will enable the latter experiments to distinguish between the extra dimensional and the SM for M_c up to about 6 TeV.