• With the advent of the space missions CoRoT and Kepler, it has become feasible to determine precise asteroseismic masses and ages for large samples of red-giant stars. In this paper, we present the CoRoGEE dataset -- obtained from CoRoT lightcurves for 606 red giant stars in two fields of the Galactic disc which have been co-observed for an ancillary project of APOGEE. We have used the Bayesian parameter estimation code PARAM to calculate distances, extinctions, masses, and ages for these stars in a homogeneous analysis, resulting in relative statistical uncertainties of $\sim2\%$ in distance, $\sim4\%$ in radius, $\sim9\%$ in mass and $\sim25\%$ in age. We also assess systematic age uncertainties due to different input physics and mass loss. We discuss the correlation between ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars over a large radial range of the Milky Way's disc (5 kpc $<R_{\rm Gal}<$ 14 kpc), focussing on the [$\alpha$/Fe]-[Fe/H]-age plane in five radial bins of the Galactic disc. We find an overall agreement with the expectations of chemical-evolution models computed before the present data were available, especially for the outer regions. However, our data also indicate that a significant fraction of stars now observed near and beyond the Solar Neighbourhood migrated from inner regions. Mock CoRoGEE observations of a chemo-dynamical Milky Way disc model show that the number of high-metallicity stars in the outer disc is too high to be accounted for even by the strong radial mixing present in the model. The mock observations also reveal that the age distribution of the [$\alpha$/Fe]-enhanced sequence in the CoRoGEE inner-disc field is much broader than expected from a combination of radial mixing and observational errors. We suggest that a thick disc/bulge component that formed stars for more than 3 Gyr may account for these discrepancies.
  • Among the known groups of pulsating stars, $\delta$ Sct stars are one of the least understood. Theoretical models do not predict the oscillation frequencies that observations reveal. Complete asteroseismic studies are necessary to improve these models and better understand the internal structure of these targets. We study the $\delta$ Sct star HD 41641 with the ultimate goal of understanding its oscillation pattern. The target was simultaneously observed by the CoRoT space telescope and the HARPS high-resolution spectrograph. The photometric data set was analyzed with the software package PERIOD04, while FAMIAS was used to analyze the line profile variations. The method of spectrum synthesis was used for spectroscopically determining the fundamental atmospheric parameters and individual chemical abundances. A total of 90 different frequencies was identified and analyzed. An unambiguous identification of the azimuthal order of the surface geometry could only be provided for the dominant p-mode, which was found to be a nonradial prograde mode with m = +1. Using $T_\mathrm{eff}$ and $\log g$, we estimated the mass, radius, and evolutionary stage of HD 41641. We find HD 41641 to be a moderately rotating, slightly evolved $\delta$ Sct star with subsolar overall atmospheric metal content and unexpected chemical peculiarities. HD 41641 is a pure $\delta$ Sct pulsator with p-mode frequencies in the range from 10 d$^{-1}$ to 20 d$^{-1}$. This pulsating star presents chemical signatures of an Ap star and rotational modulation due to surface inhomogeneities, which we consider indirect evidence of the presence of a magnetic field.
  • We study the distribution of the photometric rotation period (Prot), which is a direct measurement of the surface rotation at active latitudes, for three subsamples of Sun-like stars: one from CoRoT data and two from Kepler data. We identify the main populations of these samples and interpret their main biases specifically for a comparison with the solar Prot. Prot and variability amplitude (A) measurements were obtained from public CoRoT and Kepler catalogs combined with physical parameters. Because these samples are subject to selection effects, we computed synthetic samples with simulated biases to compare with observations, particularly around the location of the Sun in the HR diagram. Theoretical grids and empirical relations were used to combine physical parameters with Prot and A. Biases were simulated by performing cutoffs on the physical and rotational parameters in the same way as in each observed sample. A crucial cutoff is related with the detectability of the rotational modulation, which strongly depends on A. The synthetic samples explain the observed Prot distributions of Sun-like stars as having two main populations: one of young objects (group I, with ages younger than ~1 Gyr) and another of MS and evolved stars (group II, with ages older than ~1 Gyr). The proportions of groups I and II in relation to the total number of stars range within 64-84% and 16-36%, respectively. Hence, young objects abound in the distributions, producing the effect of observing a high number of short periods around the location of the Sun in the HR diagram. Differences in the Prot distributions between the CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like samples may be associated with different Galactic populations. Overall, the synthetic distribution around the solar period agrees with observations, which suggests that the solar rotation is normal with respect to Sun-like stars within the accuracy of current data.
  • We report the detection of a rare transiting brown dwarf with a mass of 59 M_Jup and radius of 1.1 R_Jup around the metal-rich, [Fe/H] = +0.44, G9V star CoRoT-33. The orbit is eccentric (e = 0.07) with a period of 5.82 d. The companion, CoRoT-33b, is thus a new member in the so-called brown dwarf desert. The orbital period is within 3% to a 3:2 resonance with the rotational period of the star. CoRoT-33b may be an important test case for tidal evolution studies. The true frequency of brown dwarfs close to their host stars (P < 10 d) is estimated to be approximately 0.2% which is about six times smaller than the frequency of hot Jupiters in the same period range. We suspect that the frequency of brown dwarfs declines faster with decreasing period than that of giant planets.
  • For 6 years the Convection, Rotation, and Planetary Transits (CoRoT) space mission has acquired photometric data from more than one hundred thousand point sources towards and directly opposite from the inner and outer regions of the Galaxy. The high temporal resolution of the CoRoT data combined with the wide time span of the observations has enabled the study of short and long time variations in unprecedented detail. From the initial sample of 2534 stars classified as M-giants in the CoRoT databasis, we selected 1428 targets that exhibit well defined variability, using visual inspection. The variability period and amplitude of C1 stars (stars having Teff < 4200 K) were computed using Lomb-Scargle and harmonic fit methods. The trends found in the V-I vs J-K color-color diagram are in agreement with standard empirical calibrations for M-giants. The sources located towards the inner regions of the Galaxy are distributed throughout the diagram while the majority of the stars towards the outer regions of the Galaxy are spread between the calibrations of M-giants and the predicted position for Carbon stars. The stars classified as supergiants follow a different sequence from the one found for giant stars. We also performed a KS test of the period and amplitude of stars towards the inner and outer regions of the Galaxy. We obtained a low probability that the two samples come from the same parent distribution. The observed behavior of the period-amplitude and period-Teff diagrams are, in general, in agreement with those found for Kepler sources and ground based photometry, with pulsation being the dominant cause responsible for the observed modulation. We also conclude that short-time variations on M-Giant stars do not exist orare very rare and the few cases we found are possibly related to biases or background stars.
  • Context. We present the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the satellite CoRoT. Aims. We aim at a characterization of the planetary bulk parameters, which allow us to further investigate the formation and evolution of the planetary systems and the main properties of the host stars. Methods. We used the transit light curve to characterize the planetary parameters relative to the stellar parameters. The analysis of HARPS spectra established the planetary nature of the detections, providing their masses. Further photometric and spectroscopic ground-based observations provided stellar parameters (log g,Teff,v sin i) to characterize the host stars. Our model takes the geometry of the transit to constrain the stellar density into account, which when linked to stellar evolutionary models, determines the bulk parameters of the star. Because of the asymmetric shape of the light curve of one of the planets, we had to include the possibility in our model that the stellar surface was not strictly spherical. Results. We present the planetary parameters of CoRoT-28b, a Jupiter-sized planet (mass 0.484+/-0.087MJup; radius 0.955+/-0.066RJup) orbiting an evolved star with an orbital period of 5.208 51 +/- 0.000 38 days, and CoRoT-29b, another Jupiter-sized planet (mass 0.85 +/- 0.20MJup; radius 0.90 +/- 0.16RJup) orbiting an oblate star with an orbital period of 2.850 570 +/- 0.000 006 days. The reason behind the asymmetry of the transit shape is not understood at this point. Conclusions. These two new planetary systems have very interesting properties and deserve further study, particularly in the case of the star CoRoT-29.
  • Context. The availability of asteroseismic constraints for a large sample of red giant stars from the CoRoT and Kepler missions paves the way for various statistical studies of the seismic properties of stellar populations. Aims. We use the first detailed spectroscopic study of 19 CoRoT red-giant stars (Morel et al 2014) to compare theoretical stellar evolution models to observations of the open cluster NGC 6633 and field stars. Methods. In order to explore the effects of rotation-induced mixing and thermohaline instability, we compare surface abundances of carbon isotopic ratio and lithium with stellar evolution predictions. These chemicals are sensitive to extra-mixing on the red-giant branch. Results. We estimate mass, radius, and distance for each star using the seismic constraints. We note that the Hipparcos and seismic distances are different. However, the uncertainties are such that this may not be significant. Although the seismic distances for the cluster members are self consistent they are somewhat larger than the Hipparcos distance. This is an issue that should be considered elsewhere. Models including thermohaline instability and rotation-induced mixing, together with the seismically determined masses can explain the chemical properties of red-giants targets. However, with this sample of stars we cannot perform stringent tests of the current stellar models. Tighter constraints on the physics of the models would require the measurement of the core and surface rotation rates, and of the period spacing of gravity-dominated mixed modes. A larger number of stars with longer times series, as provided by Kepler or expected with Plato, would help for ensemble asteroseismology.
  • The study of RR Lyrae stars has recently been invigorated thanks to the long, uninterrupted, ultra-precise time series data provided by the Kepler and CoRoT space telescopes. We give a brief overview of the new observational findings concentrating on the connection between period doubling and the Blazhko modulation, and the omnipresence of additional periodicities in all RR Lyrae subtypes, except for non-modulated RRab stars. Recent theoretical results demonstrate that if more than two modes are present in a nonlinear dynamical system such as a high-amplitude RR Lyrae star, the outcome is often an extremely intricate dynamical state. Thus, based on these discoveries, an underlying picture of complex dynamical interactions between modes is emerging which sheds new light on the century-old Blazhko-phenomenon, as well. New directions of theoretical efforts, like multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, future space photometric missions and detailed spectroscopic investigations will pave the way towards a more complete understanding of the atmospheric and pulsation dynamics of these enigmatic touchstone objects.
  • The CoRoT satellite has provided high-precision photometric light curves for more than 163,000 stars and found several hundreds of transiting systems compatible with a planetary scenario. If ground-based velocimetric observations are the best way to identify the actual planets among many possible configurations of eclipsing binary systems, recent transit surveys have shown that it is not always within reach of the radial-velocity detection limits. In this paper, we present a transiting exoplanet candidate discovered by CoRoT whose nature cannot be established from ground-based observations, and where extensive analyses are used to validate the planet scenario. They are based on observing constraints from radial-velocity spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging and the CoRoT transit shape, as well as from priors on stellar populations, planet and multiple stellar systems frequency. We use the fully Bayesian approach developed in the PASTIS analysis software, and conclude that the planet scenario is at least 1400 times more probable than any other false positive scenario. The primary star is a metallic solar-like dwarf, with Ms = 1.099+-0.049 Msun and Rs = 1.136 (+0.038,-0.090) Rsun . The validated planet has a radius of Rp = 4.88 (+0.17,-0.39) RE and mass less than 49 ME. Its mean density is smaller than 2.56 g/cm^3 and orbital period is 9.7566+-0.0012 days. This object, called CoRoT-22 b, adds to a large number of validated Kepler planets. These planets do not have a proper measurement of the mass but allow statistical characterization of the exoplanet population.
  • We search for signs of period doubling in CoRoT RR Lyrae stars. The occurrence of this dynamical effect in modulated RR Lyrae stars might help us to gain more information about the mysterious Blazhko effect. The temporal variability of the additional frequencies in representatives of all subtypes of RR Lyrae stars is also investigated. We pre-process CoRoT light curves by applying trend and jump correction and outlier removal. Standard Fourier technique is used to analyze the frequency content of our targets and follow the time dependent phenomena. The most comprehensive collection of CoRoT RR Lyrae stars, including new discoveries is presented and analyzed. We found alternating maxima and in some cases half-integer frequencies in four CoRoT Blazhko RR Lyrae stars, as clear signs of the presence of period doubling. This reinforces that period doubling is an important ingredient to understand the Blazhko effect - a premise we derived previously from the Kepler RR Lyrae sample. As expected, period doubling is detectable only for short time intervals in most modulated RRab stars. Our results show that the temporal variability of the additional frequencies in all RR Lyrae sub-types is ubiquitous. The ephemeral nature and the highly variable amplitude of these variations suggest a complex underlying dynamics of and an intricate interplay between radial and possibly nonradial modes in RR Lyrae stars. The omnipresence of additional modes in all types of RR Lyrae - except in non-modulated RRab stars - implies that asteroseismology of these objects should be feasible in the near future (Abridged).
  • We demonstrate that a seismic analysis of stars in their earliest evolutionary phases is a powerful method to identify young stars and distinguish their evolutionary states. The early star that is born from the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud reaches at some point sufficient temperature, mass and luminosity to be detected. Accretion stops and the pre-main sequence star that emerges is nearly fully convective and chemically homogeneous. It will continue to contract gravitationally until the density and temperature in the core are high enough to start nuclear burning of hydrogen. We show that there is a relationship between detected pulsation properties for a sample of young stars and their evolutionary status illustrating the potential of asteroseismology for the early evolutionary phases.
  • We present the discovery of a candidate multiply-transiting system, the first one found in the CoRoT mission. Two transit-like features with periods of 5.11 and 11.76d are detected in the CoRoT light curve, around a main sequence K1V star of r=15.1. If the features are due to transiting planets around the same star, these would correspond to objects of 3.7$\pm$0.4 and 5.0$\pm$0.5 R_earth respectively. Several radial velocities serve to provide an upper limit of 5.7 M_earth for the 5.11~d signal, and to tentatively measure a mass of 28$^{+11}_{-11}$ M_earth for the object transiting with a 11.76~d period. These measurements imply low density objects, with a significant gaseous envelope. The detailed analysis of the photometric and spectroscopic data serve to estimate the probability that the observations are caused by transiting Neptune-sized planets as $>$26$\times$ higher than a blend scenario involving only one transiting planet, and $>$900$\times$ higher than a scenario involving two blends and no planets. The radial velocities show a long term modulation that might be attributed to a 1.5 M_jup planet orbiting at 1.8~A.U. from the host, but more data are required to determine the precise orbital parameters of this companion.
  • Pulsating stars in binary systems are ideal laboratories to test stellar evolution and pulsation theory, since a direct, model-independent determination of component masses is possible. The high-precision CoRoT photometry allows a detailed view of the frequency content of pulsating stars, enabling detection of patterns in their distribution. The object HD 51844 is such a case showing periastron brightening instead of eclipses. We present a comprehensive study of the HD 51844 system, where we derive physical parameters of both components, the pulsation content and frequency patterns. Additionally, we obtain the orbital elements, including masses, and the chemical composition of the stars. Time series analysis using standard tools was mployed to extract the pulsation frequencies. Photospheric abundances of 21 chemical elements were derived by means of spectrum synthesis. We derived orbital elements both by fitting the observed radial velocities and the light curves, and we did asteroseismic modelling as well. We found that HD 51844 is a double lined spectroscopic binary. The determined abundances are consistent with delta Delphini classification. We determined the orbital period (33.498 +- 0.002 d), the eccentricity (0.484 +- 0.020), the mass ratio (0.988 +- 0.02), and the masses to 2.0 +- 0.2 M_sun for both components. Only one component showed pulsation. Two p modes (f_22 and f_36) and one g mode (f_orb) may be tidally excited. Among the 115 frequencies, we detected triplets due to the frequency modulation, frequency differences connected to the orbital period, and unexpected resonances (3:2, 3:5, and 3:4), which is a new discovery for a delta Scuti star.
  • Context. The object HD 43587Aa is a G0V star observed during the 145-day LRa03 run of the COnvection, ROtation and planetary Transits space mission (CoRoT), for which complementary High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectra with S/N>300 were also obtained. Its visual magnitude is 5.71, and its effective temperature is close to 5950 K. It has a known companion in a highly eccentric orbit and is also coupled with two more distant companions. Aims. We undertake a preliminary investigation of the internal structure of HD 43587Aa. Methods. We carried out a seismic analysis of the star, using maximum likelihood estimators and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. Results. We established the first table of the eigenmode frequencies, widths, and heights for HD 43587Aa. The star appears to have a mass and a radius slightly larger than the Sun, and is slightly older (5.6 Gyr). Two scenarios are suggested for the geometry of the star: either its inclination angle is very low, or the rotation velocity of the star is very low. Conclusions. A more detailed study of the rotation and of the magnetic and chromospheric activity for this star is needed, and will be the subject of a further study. New high resolution spectrometric observations should be performed for at least several months in duration.
  • We report the discovery of a massive and dense transiting planet CoRoT-27b on a 3.58 day orbit around a 4.2 Gyr-old G2 star. The planet candidate was identified from the CoRoT photometry, and was confirmed as a planet with ground-based spectroscopy. The confirmation of the planet candidate is based on radial velocity observations combined with imaging to rule out blends. The characterisation of the planet and its host star is carried out using a Bayesian approach where all the data (CoRoT photometry, radial velocities, and spectroscopic characterisation of the star) are used jointly. The Bayesian analysis includes a study whether the assumption of white normally distributed noise holds for the CoRoT photometry, and whether the use of a non-normal noise distribution offers advantages in parameter estimation and model selection. CoRoT-27b has a mass of $10.39 \pm 0.55$ $\mathrm{M}_{\rm Jup}$, a radius of $1.01 \pm 0.04$ $\mathrm{R}_{\rm Jup}$, a mean density of $12.6_{-1.67}^{+1.92}$ $\mathrm{g\,cm^{-3}}$, and an effective temperature of $1500 \pm 130$ K. The planet orbits around its host star, a 4.2 Gyr-old G2-star with a mass $M_{\star}=1.06$ $M_{\odot}$, and a radius $R_{\star}=1.05$ $R_{\odot}$, on a $0.048 \pm 0.007$ AU orbit every 3.58 days. The radial velocity observations allow us to exclude highly eccentric orbits, namely, $e<0.065$ with a 99% confidence. Given its high mass and density, theoretical modelling of CoRoT-27b is demanding. We identify two solutions with heavy element mass fractions of $0.11\pm0.08$ $\mathrm{M_{\oplus}}$ and $0.07\pm0.06$ $\mathrm{M_{\oplus}}$, but even solutions void of heavy elements cannot be excluded. We carry out a secondary eclipse search from the CoRoT photometry using a method based on Bayesian model selection, but conclude that the noise level is too high to detect eclipses shallower than 9% of the transit depth.
  • The existence of pulsations in HgMn stars is still being debated. To provide the first unambiguous observational detection of pulsations in this class of chemically peculiar objects, the bright star HD 45975 was monitored for nearly two months by the CoRoT satellite. Independent analyses of the light curve provides evidence of monoperiodic variations with a frequency of 0.7572 c/d and a peak-to-peak amplitude of ~2800 ppm. Multisite, ground-based spectroscopic observations overlapping the CoRoT observations show the star to be a long-period, single-lined binary. Furthermore, with the notable exception of mercury, they reveal the same periodicity as in photometry in the line moments of chemical species exhibiting strong overabundances (e.g., Mn and Y). In contrast, lines of other elements do not show significant variations. As found in other HgMn stars, the pattern of variability consists in an absorption bump moving redwards across the line profiles. We argue that the photometric and spectroscopic changes are more consistent with an interpretation in terms of rotational modulation of spots at the stellar surface. In this framework, the existence of pulsations producing photometric variations above the ~50 ppm level is unlikely in HD 45975. This provides strong constraints on the excitation/damping of pulsation modes in this HgMn star.
  • A large set of stars observed by CoRoT and Kepler shows clear evidence for the presence of a stellar background, which is interpreted to arise from surface convection, i.e., granulation. These observations show that the characteristic time-scale (tau_eff) and the root-mean-square (rms) brightness fluctuations (sigma) associated with the granulation scale as a function of the peak frequency (nu_max) of the solar-like oscillations. We aim at providing a theoretical background to the observed scaling relations based on a model developed in the companion paper. We computed for each 3D model the theoretical power density spectrum (PDS) associated with the granulation as seen in disk-integrated intensity on the basis of the theoretical model. For each PDS we derived tau_eff and sigma and compared these theoretical values with the theoretical scaling relations derived from the theoretical model and the Kepler measurements. We derive theoretical scaling relations for tau_eff and sigma, which show the same dependence on nu_max as the observed scaling relations. In addition, we show that these quantities also scale as a function of the turbulent Mach number (Ma) estimated at the photosphere. The theoretical scaling relations for tau_eff and sigma match the observations well on a global scale. Our modelling provides additional theoretical support for the observed variations of sigma and tau_eff with nu_m max. It also highlights the important role of Ma in controlling the properties of the stellar granulation. However, the observations made with Kepler on a wide variety of stars cannot confirm the dependence of our scaling relations on Ma. Measurements of the granulation background and detections of solar-like oscillations in a statistically sufficient number of cool dwarf stars will be required for confirming the dependence of the theoretical scaling relations with Ma.
  • {We aim to detect and interpret photometric and spectroscopic variability of the bright CoRoT B-type supergiant target HD\,46769 ($V=5.79$). We also attempt to detect a magnetic field in the target.} {We analyse a 23-day oversampled CoRoT light curve after detrending, as well as spectroscopic follow-up data, by using standard Fourier analysis and Phase Dispersion Minimization methods. We determine the fundamental parameters of the star, as well as its abundances from the most prominent spectral lines. We perform a Monte Carlo analysis of spectropolarimetric data to obtain an upper limit of the polar magnetic field, assumping a dipole field.} {In the CoRoT data, we detect a dominant period of 4.84\,d with an amplitude of 87\,ppm, and some of its (sub-)multiples. Given the shape of the phase-folded light curve and the absence of binary motion, we interpret the dominant variability in terms of rotational modulation, with a rotation period of 9.69\,d. Subtraction of the rotational modulation signal does not reveal any sign of pulsations. Our results are consistent with the absence of variability in the Hipparcos light curve. The spectroscopy leads to a projected rotational velocity of 72$\pm 2$\,km\,s$^{-1}$ and does not reveal periodic variability nor the need to invoke macroturbulent line broadening. No signature of a magnetic field is detected in our data. A field stronger than $\sim 500$\,G at the poles can be excluded, unless the possible non-detected field were more complex than dipolar.} {The absence of pulsations and of macroturbulence of this evolved B-type supergiant is placed into context of instability computations and of observed variability of evolved B-type stars.}
  • The star CoRoT102781750 reveals a puzzle, showing a very complex and altering variation in different `CoRoT colours'. We established without doubt that more than a single star was situated within the CoRoT mask. Using a search for periodicity as a tool, our aim is to disentangle the composite light curve and identify the type of sources behind the variability. Both flux and magnitude light curves were used. Conversion was applied after a jump- and trend-filtering algorithm. We applied different types of period-finding techniques including MuFrAn and Period04. The amplitude and phase peculiarities obtained from the independent analysis of CoRoT r, g, and b colours and ground-based follow-up photometric observations ruled out the possibility of either a background monoperiodic or a Blazhko type RR Lyrae star being in the mask. The main target, an active star, shows at least two spotted areas that reveal a $P_rot = 8.8$ hours $(f_0 = 2.735$ c d$^{-1})$ mean rotation period. The evolution of the active regions helped to derive a period change of $dP/dt = 1.6\cdot 10^{-6}$ (18 s over the run) and a differential rotation of $\alpha = \Delta\Omega/\Omega = 0.0074$. The $0\fm 015$ linear decrease and a local $0\fm 005$ increase in the dominant period's amplitude are interpreted as a decay of the old spotted region and an appearance of a new one, respectively. A star that is detected only in the CoRoT b domain shows a $f_1 = 7.172$ c d$^{-1}$ pulsation connected to a $14\fd 83$ periodicity via an equidistant triplet structure. The best explanation for our observation is a $\beta$ Cep star with a corotating dust disk.
  • The satellite CoRoT (Convection, Rotation, and planetary Transits) has provided high-quality data for almost six years. We show here the asteroseismic analysis and modeling of HD169392A, which belongs to a binary system weakly gravitationally bound as the distance between the two components is of 4250 AU. The main component, HD169392A, is a G0IV star with a magnitude of 7.50 while the second component is a G0V-G2IV star with a magnitude of 8.98. This analysis focuses on the main component, as the secondary one is too faint to measure any seismic parameters. A complete modeling has been possible thanks to the complementary spectroscopic observations from HARPS, providing Teff=5985+/-60K, log g=3.96+/-0.07, and [Fe/H]=- 0.04+/-0.10.
  • The aim of this work was to use a multi-approach technique to derive the most accurate values possible of the physical parameters of the \delta Sct star HD174966. In addition, we searched for a periodic pattern in the frequency spectra with the goal of using it to determine the mean density of the star. First, we extracted the frequency content from the CoRoT light curve. Then, we derived the physical parameters of HD174966 and carried a mode identification out from the spectroscopic and photometric observations. We used this information to look for the models fulfilling all the conditions and discussed the inaccuracies of the method because of the rotation effects. In a final step, we searched for patterns in the frequency set using a Fourier transform, discussed its origin and studied the possibility of using the periodicity to obtain information about the physical parameters of the star. A total of 185 peaks were obtained from the Fourier analysis of the CoRoT light curve, being almost all reliable pulsating frequencies. From the spectroscopic observations, 18 oscillation modes were detected and identified, and the inclination angle ($62.5^{\circ}$$^{+7.5}_{-17.5}$) and the rotational velocity of the star (142 km/s) were estimated. From the multi-colour photometric observations, 3 frequencies were detected, which correspond to the main ones in the CoRoT light curve. We looked for periodicities within the 185 frequencies and found a periodic pattern ~64 \mu Hz. Using the inclination angle, the rotational velocity and an Echelle diagram, showing a double comb outside the asymptotic regime, we concluded that the periodicity corresponds to a large separation structure. The periodic pattern allowed us to discriminate models from a grid, finding that the value of the mean density is achieved with a 6% uncertainty. So, the pattern could be used as a new observable for A-F type stars.
  • The high accuracy of space data increased the number of the periodicities determined for pulsating variable stars, but the mode identification is still a critical point in the non-asymptotic regime. We use regularities in frequency spacings for identifying the pulsation modes of the recently discovered delta Sct star ID 102749568. In addition to analysing CoRoT light curves (15252 datapoints spanning 131 days), we obtained and analysed both spectroscopic and extended multi-colour photometric data. We applied standard tools (MUFRAN, Period04, SigSpec, and FAMIAS) for time-series analysis. A satisfactory light-curve fit was obtaining by means of 52 independent modes and 15 combination terms. The frequency spacing revealed distinct peaks around large (25.55-31.43 microHz), intermediate (9.80, 7.66 microHz), and low (2.35 microHz) separations. We directly identified 9 modes, and the l and n values of other three modes were extrapolated. The combined application of spectroscopy, multi-colour photometry, and modelling yielded the precise physical parameters and confirmed the observational mode identification. The large separation constrained the log g and related quantities. The dominant mode is the radial first overtone.
  • To date, the CoRoT space mission has produced more than 124,471 light curves. Classifying these curves in terms of unambiguous variability behavior is mandatory for obtaining an unbiased statistical view on their controlling root-causes. The present study provides an overview of semi-sinusoidal light curves observed by the CoRoT exo-field CCDs. We selected a sample of 4,206 light curves presenting well-defined semi-sinusoidal signatures. The variability periods were computed based on Lomb-Scargle periodograms, harmonic fits, and visual inspection. Color-period diagrams for the present sample show the trend of an increase of the variability periods as long as the stars evolve. This evolutionary behavior is also noticed when comparing the period distribution in the Galactic center and anti-center directions. These aspects indicate a compatibility with stellar rotation, although more information is needed to confirm their root-causes. Considering this possibility, we identified a subset of three Sun-like candidates by their photometric period. Finally, the variability period versus color diagram behavior was found to be highly dependent on the reddening correction.
  • We concentrate on an asteroseismological study of HD 261711, a rather hot delta Scuti type pulsating member of the young open cluster NGC 2264 located at the blue border of the instability region. HD 261711 was discovered to be a pre-main sequence delta Scuti star using the time series photometry obtained by the MOST satellite in 2006. High-precision, time-series photometry of HD 261711 was obtained by the MOST and CoRoT satellites in 4 separate new observing runs that are put into context with the star's fundamental atmospheric parameters obtained from spectroscopy. With the new MOST data set from 2011/12 and the two CoRoT light curves from 2008 and 2011/12, the delta Scuti variability was confirmed and regular groups of frequencies were discovered. The two pulsation frequencies identified in the data from the first MOST observing run in 2006 are confirmed and 23 new delta Scuti-type frequencies were discovered using the CoRoT data. Weighted average frequencies for each group are related to l=0 and l=1 p-modes. Evidence for amplitude modulation of the frequencies in two groups is seen. The effective temperature was derived to be 8600$\pm$200 K, log g is 4.1$\pm$0.2, and the projected rotational velocity is 53$\pm$1km/s. Using our Teff value and the radius of 1.8$\pm$0.5 Rsun derived from SED fitting, we get a log L/Lsun of 1.20$\pm$0.14 which agrees well to the seismologically determined values of 1.65 Rsun and, hence, a log L/Lsun of 1.13. The radial velocity of 14$\pm$2 km/s we derived for HD 261711, confirms the star's membership to NGC 2264. Our asteroseismic models suggest that HD 261711 is a delta Scuti-type star close to the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) with a mass of 1.8 to 1.9Msun. HD 261711 is either a young ZAMS star or a late PMS star just before the onset of hydrogen-core burning.
  • Variability is a signature property of cool young stars, particularly for those surrounded by disks. Traditional single-band time series display complex features associated with accretion, disk structure, and accompanying stellar activity, but these processes are challenging to model. To make progress in connecting observed time domain properties with the underlying physics of young stars and their disks, we have embarked on an unprecedented multiwavelength monitoring campaign: the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 ("CSI 2264"). Beginning in December 2011, CSI 2264 has acquired 30 continuous days of mid-infrared time series from Spitzer, simultaneous optical monitoring from CoRoT and MOST, X-ray observations with Chandra, as well as complementary data from a number of ground-based telescopes. The extraordinary photometric precision, cadence, and time baseline of these observations enable detailed correlation of variability properties at different wavelengths, corresponding to locations from the stellar surface to the inner AU of the disk. We present the early results of the program, and discuss the need for further modeling efforts into young stars and their disks.