• We compute the partition function and specific heat for a quantum mechanical particle under the influence of a quartic double-well potential non-perturbatively, using the semiclassical method. Near the region of bounded motion in the inverted potential, the usual quadratic approximation fails due to the existence of multiple classical solutions and caustics. Using the tools of catastrophe theory, we identify the relevant classical solutions, showing that at most two have to be considered. This corresponds to the first step towards the study of spontaneous symmetry breaking and thermal phase transitions in the non-perturbative framework of the boundary effective theory.
  • We calculate the one-loop effective potential at finite temperature for a system of massless scalar fields with quartic interaction $\lambda\phi^4$ in the framework of the boundary effective theory (BET) formalism. The calculation relies on the solution of the classical equation of motion for the field, and Gaussian fluctuations around it. Our result is non-perturbative and differs from the standard one-loop effective potential for field values larger than $T/\sqrt{\lambda}$.
  • We use the boundary effective theory (BET) approach to thermal field theory in order to calculate the pressure of a system of massless scalar fields with quartic interaction. The method naturally separates the infrared physics, and is essentially non-perturbative. To lowest order, the main ingredient is the solution of the free Euler-Lagrange equation with non-trivial (time) boundary conditions. We derive a resummed pressure, which is in good agreement with recent calculations found in the literature, following a very direct and compact procedure.
  • We show that the one-loop effective action at finite temperature for a scalar field with quartic interaction has the same renormalized expression as at zero temperature if written in terms of a certain classical field $\phi_c$, and if we trade free propagators at zero temperature for their finite-temperature counterparts. The result follows if we write the partition function as an integral over field eigenstates (boundary fields) of the density matrix element in the functional Schr\"{o}dinger field-representation, and perform a semiclassical expansion in two steps: first, we integrate around the saddle-point for fixed boundary fields, which is the classical field $\phi_c$, a functional of the boundary fields; then, we perform a saddle-point integration over the boundary fields, whose correlations characterize the thermal properties of the system. This procedure provides a dimensionally-reduced effective theory for the thermal system. We calculate the two-point correlation as an example.
  • We investigate the process of phase conversion in a thermally-driven {\it weakly} first-order quark-hadron transition. This scenario is physically appealing even if the nature of this transition in equilibrium proves to be a smooth crossover for vanishing baryonic chemical potential. We construct an effective potential by combining the equation of state obtained within Lattice QCD for the partonic sector with that of a gas of resonances in the hadronic phase, and present numerical results on bubble profiles, nucleation rates and time evolution, including the effects from reheating on the dynamics for different expansion scenarios. Our findings confirm the standard picture of a cosmological first-order transition, in which the process of phase conversion is entirely dominated by nucleation, also in the case of a weakly first-order transition. On the other hand, we show that, even for expansion rates much lower than those expected in high-energy heavy ion collisions, nucleation is very unlikely, indicating that the main mechanism of phase conversion is spinodal decomposition. Our results are compared to those obtained for a strongly first-order transition, as the one provided by the MIT bag model.
  • We present a unified formulation for quantum statistical physics based on the representation of the density matrix as a functional integral. We identify the stochastic variable of the effective statistical theory that we derive as a boundary configuration and a zero mode relevant to the discussion of infrared physics. We illustrate our formulation by computing the partition function of an interacting one-dimensional quantum mechanical system at finite temperature from the path-integral representation for the density matrix. The method of calculation provides an alternative to the usual sum over periodic trajectories: it sums over paths with coincident endpoints, and includes non-vanishing boundary terms. An appropriately modified expansion into Matsubara modes provides a natural separation of the zero-mode physics. This feature may be useful in the treatment of infrared divergences that plague the perturbative approach in thermal field theory.
  • Several relevant aspects of quantum-field processes can be well described by semiclassical methods. In particular, the knowledge of non-trivial classical solutions of the field equations, and the thermal and quantum fluctuations around them, provide non-perturbative information about the theory. In this work, we discuss the calculation of the one-loop effective action from the semiclasssical viewpoint. We intend to use this formalism to obtain an accurate expression for the decay rate of non-static metastable states.
  • We present numerical results on bubble profiles, nucleation rates and time evolution for a weakly first-order quark-hadron phase transition in different expansion scenarios. We confirm the standard picture of a cosmological first-order phase transition, in which the phase transition is entirely dominated by nucleation. We also show that, even for expansion rates much lower than those expected in heavy-ion collisions nucleation is very unlikely, indicating that the main phase conversion mechanism is spinodal decomposition.
  • We present a systematic semiclassical procedure to compute the partition function for scalar field theories at finite temperature. The central objects in our scheme are the solutions of the classical equations of motion in imaginary time, with spatially independent boundary conditions. Field fluctuations -- both field deviations around these classical solutions, and fluctuations of the boundary value of the fields -- are resummed in a Gaussian approximation. In our final expression for the partition function, this resummation is reduced to solving certain ordinary differential equations. Moreover, we show that it is renormalizable with the usual 1-loop counterterms.
  • Assuming a first-order chiral transition scenario, we study the process of phase conversion driven by homogeneous nucleation. We adopt a quasiparticle model whose parameters are fit to lattice QCD data to describe the pressure at high temperature in the deconfined sector, and a bag model equation of state for pions in the low-temperature sector. We compute the critical radius and nucleation rate in the thin-wall approximation, and compare the results to the ones obtained using the bag model and the linear $\sigma$ model.
  • We compute one-loop correlation functions for the fluctuations of an interface using a field theory model. We obtain them from Feynman diagrams drawn with a propagator which is the inverse of the Hamiltonian of a Poschl-Teller problem. We derive an expression for the propagator in terms of elementary functions, show that it corresponds to the usual spectral sum, and use it to calculate quantities such as the surface tension and interface profile in two and three spatial dimensions. The three-dimensional quantities are rederived in a simple, unified manner, whereas those in two dimensions extend the existing literature, and are applicable to thin films. In addition, we compute the one-loop self-energy, which may be extracted from experiment, or from Monte Carlo simulations. Our results may be applied in various scenarios, which include fluctuations around topological defects in cosmology, supersymmetric domain walls, Z(N) bubbles in QCD, domain walls in magnetic systems, interfaces separating Bose-Einstein condensates, and interfaces in binary liquid mixtures.