• We present a kinematic study of the nuclear stellar disk in M31 at infrared wavelengths using high spatial resolution integral field spectroscopy. The spatial resolution achieved, FWHM = 0."12 (0.45 pc at the distance of M31), has only previously been equaled in spectroscopic studies by space-based long-slit observations. Using adaptive optics-corrected integral field spectroscopy from the OSIRIS instrument at the W. M. Keck Observatory, we map the line-of-sight kinematics over the entire old stellar eccentric disk orbiting the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at a distance of r<4 pc. The peak velocity dispersion is 381+/-55 km/s , offset by 0.13 +/- 0.03 from the SMBH, consistent with previous high-resolution long-slit observations. There is a lack of near-infrared (NIR) emission at the position of the SMBH and young nuclear cluster, suggesting a spatial separation between the young and old stellar populations within the nucleus. We compare the observed kinematics with dynamical models from Peiris & Tremaine (2003). The best-fit disk orientation to the NIR flux is [$\theta_l$, $\theta_i$, $\theta_a$] = [-33 +/- 4$^{\circ}$, 44 +/- 2$^{\circ}$, -15 +/- 15$^{\circ}$], which is tilted with respect to both the larger-scale galactic disk and the best-fit orientation derived from optical observations. The precession rate of the old disk is $\Omega_P$ = 0.0 +/- 3.9 km/s/pc, lower than the majority of previous observations. This slow precession rate suggests that stellar winds from the disk will collide and shock, driving rapid gas inflows and fueling an episodic central starburst as suggested in Chang et al. (2007).
  • Metabarcoding on amplicons is rapidly expanding as a method to produce molecular based inventories of microbial communities. Here, we work on freshwater diatoms, which are microalgae possibly inventoried both on a morphological and a molecular basis. We have developed an algorithm, in a program called diagno-syst, based a the notion of informative read, which carries out supervised clustering of reads by mapping them exactly one by one on all reads of a well curated and taxonomically annotated reference database. This program has been run on a HPC (and HTC) infrastructure to address computation load. We compare optical and molecular based inventories on 10 samples from L\'eman lake, and 30 from Swedish rivers. We track all possibilities of mismatches between both approaches, and compare the results with standard pipelines (with heuristics) like Mothur. We find that the comparison with optics is more accurate when using exact calculations, at the price of a heavier computation load. It is crucial when studying the long tail of biodiversity, which may be overestimated by pipelines or algorithms using heuristics instead (more false positive). This work supports the analysis that these methods will benefit from progress in, first, building an agreement between molecular based and morphological based systematics and, second, having as complete as possible publicly available reference databases.
  • We describe and report first results from PALM-3000, the second-generation astronomical adaptive optics facility for the 5.1-m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. PALM-3000 has been engineered for high-contrast imaging and emission spectroscopy of brown dwarfs and large planetary mass bodies at near-infrared wavelengths around bright stars, but also supports general natural guide star use to V ~ 17. Using its unique 66 x 66 actuator deformable mirror, PALM-3000 has thus far demonstrated residual wavefront errors of 141 nm RMS under 1 arcsecond seeing conditions. PALM-3000 can provide phase conjugation correction over a 6.4 x 6.4 arcsecond working region at an observing wavelength of 2.2 microns, or full electric field (amplitude and phase) correction over approximately one half of this field. With optimized back-end instrumentation, PALM-3000 is designed to enable as high as 10e-7 contrast at ~1 arc second angular separation, after including post-observation speckle suppression processing. While optimization of the adaptive optics system is ongoing, we have already successfully commissioned five back-end science instruments and begun a major exoplanet characterization survey, Project 1640, with our partners at American Museum of Natural History and Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
  • Here we present new adaptive optics observations of the Quaoar-Weywot system. With these new observations we determine an improved system orbit. Due to a 0.39 day alias that exists in available observations, four possible orbital solutions are available with periods of $\sim11.6$, $\sim12.0$, $\sim12.4$, and $\sim12.8$ days. From the possible orbital solutions, system masses of $1.3-1.5\pm0.1\times10^{21}$ kg are found. These observations provide an updated density for Quaoar of $2.7-5.0{g cm$^{-3}$}$. In all cases, Weywot's orbit is eccentric, with possible values $\sim0.13-0.16$. We present a reanalysis of the tidal orbital evolution of the Quoaor-Weywot system. We have found that Weywot has probably evolved to a state of synchronous rotation, and have likely preserved their initial inclinations over the age of the Solar system. We find that for plausible values of the effective tidal dissipation factor tides produce a very slow evolution of Weywot's eccentricity and semi-major axis. Accordingly, it appears that Weywot's eccentricity likely did not tidally evolve to its current value from an initially circular orbit. Rather, it seems that some other mechanism has raised its eccentricity post-formation, or Weywot formed with a non-negligible eccentricity.
  • Glycolaldehyde, a sugar-related interstellar prebiotic molecule, has recently been detected in two star-forming regions, Sgr B2(N) and G31.41+0.31. The detection of this new species increased the list of complex organic molecules detected in the interstellar medium (ISM) and adds another level to the chemical complexity present in space. Besides, this kind of organic molecule is important because it is directly linked to the origin of life. For many years, astronomers have been struggling to understand the origin of this high chemical complexity in the ISM. The study of deuteration may provide crucial hints. In this context, we have measured the spectra of deuterated isotopologues of glycolaldehyde in the laboratory: the three monodeuterated ones (CH2OD-CHO, CHDOH-CHO and CH2OH-CDO) and one dideuterated derivative (CHDOH-CDO) in the ground vibrational state. Previous laboratory work on the D-isotopologues of glycolaldehyde was restricted to less than 26 GHz. We used a solidstate submillimeter-wave spectrometer in Lille with an accuracy for isolated lines better than 30 kHz to acquire new spectroscopic data between 150 and 630 GHz and employed the ASFIT and SPCAT programs for analysis. We measured around 900 new lines for each isotopologue and determined spectroscopic parameters. This allows an accurate prediction in the ALMA range up to 850 GHz. This treatment meets the needs for a first astrophysical research, for which we provide an appropriate set of predictions.
  • The Egg Nebula has been regarded as the archetype of bipolar proto-planetary nebulae, yet we lack a coherent model that can explain the morphology and kinematics of the nebular and dusty components observed at high-spatial and spectral resolution. Here, we report on two sets of observations obtained with the Keck Adaptive Optics Laser Guide Star: H to M-band NIRC2 imaging, and narrow bandpath K-band OSIRIS 3-D imaging-spectroscopy (through the H2 2.121micron emission line). While the central star or engine remains un-detected at all bands, we clearly resolve the dusty components in the central region and confirm that peak A is not a companion star. The spatially-resolved spectral analysis provide kinematic information of the H_2 emission regions in the eastern and central parts of the nebula and show projected velocities for the H_2 emission higher than 100 km/s. We discuss these observations against a possible formation scenario for the nebular components.
  • (Abridged) We present the first Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGS-AO) observations of the Galactic center. LGS-AO has dramatically improved the quality, robustness, and versatility with which high angular resolution infrared images of the Galactic center can be obtained with the W. M. Keck II 10-meter telescope. Specifically, Strehl ratios of 0.7 and 0.3 at L'[3.8 micron] and K'[2.1 micron], respectively, are achieved in these LGS-AO images. During our observations, the infrared counterpart to the central supermassive black hole, Sgr A*-IR, showed significant infrared intensity variations, with observed L' magnitudes ranging from 12.6 to 14.5 mag. The faintest end of our L' detections, 1.3 mJy (dereddened), is the lowest level of emission yet observed for this source by a factor of 3. No significant variation in the location of SgrA*-IR is detected as a function of either wavelength or intensity. Near a peak in its intensity, we obtained the first measurement of SgrA*-IR's K'-L' color (3.0 +- 0.2 mag, observed), which corresponds to an intrinsic spectral index of -0.5 +- 0.3. This is significantly bluer than other recent infrared measurements. Because our measurement was taken at a time when Sgr A* was ~6 times brighter in the infrared than the other measurements, we posit that the spectral index of the emission arising from the vicinity of our Galaxy's central black hole may depend on the strength of the flare, with stronger flares giving rise to a higher fraction of high energy electrons in the emitting region.