• (abridged) We report the discovery of three new transiting planets: WASP-85 A b, WASP-116 b, and WASP-149 b. WASP-85 b orbits its host star every 2.66 days, and has a mass of 1.25 M_Jup and a radius of 1.25 R_Jup. The host star is of G5 spectral type, with magnitude V = 11.2, and lies 141 pc distant. The system has a K-dwarf binary companion, WASP-85 B, at a separation of ~1.5". The close proximity of this companion leads to contamination of our photometry, decreasing the apparent transit depth that we account for during our analysis. Analysis of the Ca II H+K lines shows strong emission that implies that both binary components are strongly active. WASP-116 b is a warm, mildly inflated super-Saturn, with a mass of 0.59 M_Jup and a radius of 1.43 R_Jup. It was discovered orbiting a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.28 dex), cool (T_eff = 5950 K) G0 dwarf every 6.61 days. WASP-149 b is a typical hot Jupiter, orbiting a G6 dwarf with a period of 1.33 days. The planet has a mass and radius of 1.05 M_Jup and 1.29 R_Jup, respectively. The stellar host has an effective temperature of T_eff = 5750 K and has a metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.16 dex. WASP photometry of the system is contaminated by a nearby star; we therefore corrected the depth of the WASP transits using the measured dilution. WASP-149 lies inside the 'Neptune desert' identified in the planetary mass-period plane by Mazeh, Holczer & Faigler (2016). We model the modulation visible in the K2 lightcurve of WASP-85 using a simple three-spot model consisting of two large spots on WASP-85 A, and one large spot on WASP-85 B, finding rotation periods of 13.1+/-0.1 days for WASP-85 A and 7.5+/-0.03 days for WASP-85 B. We estimate stellar inclinations of I_A = 66.8+/-0.7 degrees and I_B = 39.7+/-0.2 degrees, and constrain the obliquity of WASP-85 A b to be psi<27 degrees. We therefore conclude that WASP-85 A b is very likely to be aligned.
  • We present radial-velocity measurement of eight stars observed with the HARPS Echelle spectrograph mounted on the 3.6-m telescope in La Silla (ESO, Chile). Data span more than ten years and highlight the long-term stability of the instrument. We search for potential planets orbiting HD20003, HD20781, HD21693, HD31527, HD45184, HD51608, HD134060 and HD136352 to increase the number of known planetary systems and thus better constrain exoplanet statistics. After a preliminary phase looking for signals using generalized Lomb-Scargle periodograms, we perform a careful analysis of all signals to separate \emph{bona-fide} planets from spurious signals induced by stellar activity and instrumental systematics. We finally secure the detection of all planets using the efficient MCMC available on the Data and Analysis Center for Exoplanets (DACE web-platform), using model comparison whenever necessary. In total, we report the detection of twenty new super-Earth to Neptune-mass planets, with minimum masses ranging from 2 to 30 M$_{\rm Earth}$, and periods ranging from 3 to 1300 days. By including CORALIE and HARPS measurements of HD20782 to the already published data, we also improve the characterization of the extremely eccentric Jupiter orbiting this host.
  • We report a detection of thermal emission from the hot Jupiter WASP-48b in the $K_{\rm s}$-band. We used the Wide-field Infra-red Camera on the 3.6-m Canada-France Hawaii Telescope to observe an occultation of the planet by its host star. From the resulting occultation lightcurve we find a planet-to-star contrast ratio in the Ks-band of $0.136 \pm 0.014\,\%$ , in agreement with the value of $0.109 \pm 0.027\,\%$ previously determined. We fit the two Ks-band occultation lightcurves simultaneously with occultation lightcurves in the $H$-band and the Spitzer 3.6-{\mu}m and 4.5-{\mu}m bandpasses, radial velocity data, and transit lightcurves. From this, we revise the system parameters and construct the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the dayside atmosphere. By comparing the SED with atmospheric models, we find that both models with and without a thermal inversion are consistent with the data. We find the planet's orbit to be consistent with circular ($e < 0.072$ at 3$\sigma$).
  • We present the confirmation of a small, moderately-irradiated (F = 155 +/- 7 Fearth) Neptune with a substantial gas envelope in a P=11.8728787+/-0.0000085-day orbit about a quiet, Sun-like G0V star Kepler-1655. Based on our analysis of the Kepler light curve, we determined Kepler-1655b's radius to be 2.213+/-0.082 Rearth. We acquired 95 high-resolution spectra with TNG/HARPS-N, enabling us to characterize the host star and determine an accurate mass for Kepler-1655b of 5.0+3.1/-2.8 Mearth via Gaussian-process regression. Our mass determination excludes an Earth-like composition with 98\% confidence. Kepler-1655b falls on the upper edge of the evaporation valley, in the relatively sparsely occupied transition region between rocky and gas-rich planets. It is therefore part of a population of planets that we should actively seek to characterize further.
  • We report the discovery of eight hot-Jupiter exoplanets from the WASP-South transit survey. WASP-144b has a mass of 0.44 Mj, a radius of 0.85 Rj, and is in a 2.27-d orbit around a V = 12.9, K2 star which shows a 21-d rotational modulation. WASP-145Ab is a 0.89 Mj planet in a 1.77-d orbit with a grazing transit, which means that the planetary radius is not well constrained. The host is a V = 11.5, K2 star with a companion 5 arcsecs away and 1.4 mags fainter. WASP-158b is a relatively massive planet at 2.8 Mj with a radius of 1.1 Rj and a 3.66-d orbit. It transits a V = 12.1, F6 star. WASP-159b is a bloated hot Jupiter (1.4 Rj and 0.55 Mj) in a 3.8-d orbit around a V = 12.9, F9 star. WASP-162b is a massive planet in a relatively long and highly eccentric orbit (5.2 Mj, P = 9.6 d, e = 0.43). It transits a V = 12.2, K0 star. WASP-168b is a bloated hot Jupiter (0.42 Mj, 1.5 Rj) in a 4.15-d orbit with a grazing transit. The host is a V = 12.1, F9 star. WASP-172b is a bloated hot Jupiter (0.5 Mj; 1.6 Rj) in a 5.48-d orbit around a V = 11.0, F1 star. It is likely to be the best planet of those reported here for atmospheric characterisation. WASP-173Ab is a massive planet (3.7 Mj) with a 1.2 Rj radius in a circular orbit with a period of 1.39 d. The host is a V = 11.3, G3 star, being the brighter component of the double-star system WDS23366-3437, with a companion 6 arcsecs away and 0.8 mags fainter. One of the two stars shows a rotational modulation of 7.9 d.
  • We report the discovery of four super-Earth planets around HD 215152, with orbital periods of 5.76, 7.28, 10.86, and 25.2 d, and minimum masses of 1.8, 1.7, 2.8, and 2.9 M_Earth respectively. This discovery is based on 373 high-quality radial velocity measurements taken by HARPS over 13 years. Given the low masses of the planets, the signal-to-noise ratio is not sufficient to constrain the planet eccentricities. However, a preliminary dynamical analysis suggests that eccentricities should be typically lower than about 0.03 for the system to remain stable. With two pairs of planets with a period ratio lower than 1.5, with short orbital periods, low masses, and low eccentricities, HD 215152 is similar to the very compact multi-planet systems found by Kepler, which is very rare in radial-velocity surveys. This discovery proves that these systems can be reached with the radial-velocity technique, but characterizing them requires a huge amount of observations.
  • We report the discoveries of three transiting exoplanets. WASP-91b is a warm Jupiter (1.34 $M_{\rm Jup}$, 1.03 $R_{\rm Jup}$) in a 2.8-day orbit around a metal-rich K3 star. WASP-105b is a warm Jupiter (1.8 $M_{\rm Jup}$, 0.96 $R_{\rm Jup}$) in a 7.9-day orbit around a metal-rich K2 star. WASP-107b is a warm super-Neptune/sub-Saturn (0.12 $M_{\rm Jup}$, 0.94 $R_{\rm Jup}$) in a 5.7-day orbit around a solar-metallicity K6 star. Considering that giant planets seem to be more common around stars of higher metallicity and stars of higher mass, it is notable that the hosts are all metal-rich, late-type stars. With orbital separations that place both WASP-105b and WASP-107b in the weak-tide regime, measurements of the alignment between the planets' orbital axes and their stars' spin axes may help us to understand the inward migration of short-period, giant planets. The mass of WASP-107b (2.2 $M_{\rm Nep}$, 0.40 $M_{\rm Sat}$) places it in the transition region between the ice giants and gas giants of the Solar System. Its radius of 0.94 $R_{\rm Jup}$ suggests that it is a low-mass gas giant with a H/He-dominated composition. The planet thus sets a lower limit of 2.2 $M_{\rm Nep}$ on the planetary mass above which large gaseous envelopes can be accreted and retained by proto-planets on their way to becoming gas giants. We may discover whether WASP-107b more closely resembles an ice giant or a gas giant by measuring its atmospheric metallicity via transmission spectroscopy, for which WASP-107b is a very good target.
  • We report the discovery of the transiting exoplanets WASP-69b, WASP-70Ab and WASP-84b, each of which orbits a bright star ($V\sim10)$. WASP-69b is a bloated Saturn-mass planet (0.26 $M_{\rm Jup}$, 1.06 $R_{\rm Jup}$) in a 3.868-d period around an active, $\sim$1-Gyr, mid-K dwarf. ROSAT detected X-rays $60 \pm 27"$ from WASP-69. If the star is the source then the planet could be undergoing mass-loss at a rate of $\sim$10$^{12}$ g s$^{-1}$. This is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than the evaporation rate estimated for HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which have exhibited anomalously-large Lyman-$\alpha$ absorption during transit. WASP-70Ab is a sub-Jupiter-mass planet (0.59 $M_{\rm Jup}$, 1.16 $R_{\rm Jup}$) in a 3.713-d orbit around the primary of a spatially-resolved, 9-to-10-Gyr, G4+K3 binary, with a separation of 3.3$'$ ($\geq$800 AU). WASP-84b is a sub-Jupiter-mass planet (0.69 $M_{\rm Jup}$, 0.94 $R_{\rm Jup)}$ in an 8.523-d orbit around an active, $\sim$1-Gyr, early-K dwarf. Of the transiting planets discovered from the ground to date, WASP-84b has the third-longest period. For the active stars WASP-69 and WASP-84, we pre-whitened the radial velocities using a low-order harmonic series. We found this reduced the residual scatter more than did the oft-used method of pre-whitening with a fit between residual radial velocity and bisector span. The system parameters were essentially unaffected by pre-whitening.
  • We report the discovery and tomographic detection of WASP-174b, a planet with a near-grazing transit on a 4.23-d orbit around a $V$ = 11.9, F6V star with [Fe/H] = 0.09 $\pm$ 0.09. The planet is in a moderately misaligned orbit with a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of $\lambda$ = 31$^{\circ}$ $\pm$ 1$^{\circ}$. This is in agreement with the known tendency for orbits around hotter stars to be misaligned. Owing to the grazing transit the planet's radius is uncertain, with a possible range of 0.7-1.7 R$_{\rm Jup}$. The planet's mass has an upper limit of 1.3 M$_{\rm Jup}$. WASP-174 is the faintest hot-Jupiter system so far confirmed by tomographic means.
  • To investigate the origin of the features discovered in the exoplanet population, the knowledge of exoplanets' mass and radius with a good precision is essential. In this paper, we report the discovery of three transiting exoplanets by the SuperWASP survey and the SOPHIE spectrograph with mass and radius determined with a precision better than 15 %. WASP-151b and WASP-153b are two hot Saturns with masses, radii, densities and equilibrium temperatures of 0.31^{+0.04}_{-0.03} MJ, 1.13^{+0.03}_{-0.03} RJ, 0.22^{-0.03}_{-0.02} rhoJ and 1, 290^{+20}_{-10} K, and 0.39^{+0.02}_{-0.02} MJ, 1.55^{+0.10}_{-0.08} RJ, 0.11^{+0.02}_{-0.02} rhoJ and 1, 700^{+40}_{-40} K, respectively. Their host stars are early G type stars (with magV ~ 13) and their orbital periods are 4.53 and 3.33 days, respectively. WASP-156b is a Super-Neptune orbiting a K type star (magV = 11.6) . It has a mass of 0.128^{+0.010}_{-0.009} MJ, a radius of 0.51^{+0.02}_{-0.02} RJ, a density of 1.0^{+0.1}_{-0.1} rhoJ, an equilibrium temperature of 970^{+30}_{-20} K and an orbital period of 3.83 days. WASP-151b is slightly inflated, while WASP-153b presents a significant radius anomaly. WASP-156b, being one of the few well characterised Super-Neptunes, will help to constrain the formation of Neptune size planets and the transition between gas and ice giants. The estimates of the age of these three stars confirms the tendency for some stars to have gyrochronological ages significantly lower than their isochronal ages. We propose that high eccentricity migration could partially explain this behaviour for stars hosting a short period planet. Finally, these three planets also lie close to (WASP-151b and WASP-153b) or below (WASP-156b) the upper boundary of the Neptunian desert. Their characteristics support that the ultra-violet irradiation plays an important role in this depletion of planets observed in the exoplanet population.
  • The multi-planetary system HD 106315 was recently found in K2 data . The planets have periods of $P_b \sim9.55$ and $P_c \sim 21.06\,$days, and radii of $ r_b = 2.44 \pm 0.17\, $ and $r_c = 4.35 \pm 0.23\, $ $R_{\oplus}$. The brightness of the host star (V=9.0 mag) makes it an excellent target for transmission spectroscopy. However, to interpret transmission spectra it is crucial to measure the planetary masses. We obtained high precision radial velocities for HD~106315 to determine the mass of the two transiting planets discovered with Kepler K2. Our successful observation strategy was carefully tailored to mitigate the effect of stellar variability. We modelled the new radial velocity data together with the K2 transit photometry and a new ground-based partial transit of HD 106315c to derive system parameters. We estimate the mass of HD 106315b to be 12.6 $\pm$ 3.2 $M_{\oplus}$ and the density to be $4.7 \pm 1.7\, g\,cm^{-3}$, while for HD 106315c we estimate a mass of 15.2 $\pm$ 3.7 $M_{\oplus}$ and a density of $1.01 \pm 0.29\, $g\,cm$^{-3}$. Hence, despite planet c having a radius almost twice as large as planet b, their masses are consistent with one another. We conclude that HD 106315c has a thick hydrogen-helium gaseous envelope. A detailed investigation of HD 106315b using a planetary interior model constrains the core mass fraction to be 5-29\%, and the water mass fraction to be 10-50\%. An alternative, not considered by our model, is that HD 106315b is composed of a large rocky core with a thick H-He envelope. Transmission spectroscopy of these planets will give insight into their atmospheric compositions and also help constrain their core compositions.
  • We report the joint WASP/KELT discovery of WASP-167b/KELT-13b, a transiting hot Jupiter with a 2.02-d orbit around a $V$ = 10.5, F1V star with [Fe/H] = 0.1 $\pm$ 0.1. The 1.5 R$_{\rm Jup}$ planet was confirmed by Doppler tomography of the stellar line profiles during transit. We place a limit of $<$ 8 M$_{\rm Jup}$ on its mass. The planet is in a retrograde orbit with a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of $\lambda = -165^{\circ} \pm 5^{\circ}$. This is in agreement with the known tendency for orbits around hotter stars to be more likely to be misaligned. WASP-167/KELT-13 is one of the few systems where the stellar rotation period is less than the planetary orbital period. We find evidence of non-radial stellar pulsations in the host star, making it a $\delta$-Scuti or $\gamma$-Dor variable. The similarity to WASP-33, a previously known hot-Jupiter host with pulsations, adds to the suggestion that close-in planets might be able to excite stellar pulsations.
  • We present the discovery of EPIC 228735255b, a P= 6.57 days Jupiter-mass (M$_P$=1.019$\pm$0.070 M$_{Jup}$) planet transiting a V=12.5 (G5-spectral type) star in an eccentric orbit (e=$0.120^{+0.056}_{-0.046}$) detected using a combination of K2 photometry and ground-based observations. With a radius of 1.095$\pm$0.018R$_{Jup}$ the planet has a bulk density of 0.726$\pm$0.062$\rho_{Jup}$. The host star has a [Fe/H] of 0.12$\pm$0.045, and from the K2 light curve we find a rotation period for the star of 16.3$\pm$0.1 days. This discovery is the 9th hot Jupiter from K2 and highlights K2's ability to detect transiting giant planets at periods slightly longer than traditional, ground-based surveys. This planet is slightly inflated, but much less than others with similar incident fluxes. These are of interest for investigating the inflation mechanism of hot Jupiters.
  • Context. Distinguishing between a signal induced by either stellar activity or a planet is currently the main challenge in radial velocity searches for low-mass exoplanets. Even when the presence of a transiting planet and hence its period are known, stellar activity can be the main barrier to measuring the correct amplitude of the radial velocity signal. Several tools are being used to help understand which signals come from stellar activity in the data. Aims. We aim to present a new tool that can be used for the purpose of identifying periodicities caused by stellar activity, and show how it can be used to track the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the detection over time. The tool is based on the principle that stellar activity signals are variable and incoherent. Methods. We calculate the Bayesian general Lomb-Scargle periodogram for subsets of data and by adding one extra data point we track what happens to the presence and significance of periodicities in the data. Publicly available datasets from HARPS and HARPS-N were used for this purpose. Additionally, we analysed a synthetic dataset that we created with SOAP2.0 to simulate pure stellar activity and a mixture of stellar activity and a planet. Results. We find that this tool can easily be used to identify unstable and incoherent signals, such as those introduced by stellar activity. The SNR of the detection grows approximately as the square root of the number of data points, in the case of a stable signal. This can then be used to make decisions on whether it is useful to keep observing a specific object. The tool is relatively fast and easy to use, and thus lends itself perfectly to a quick analysis of the data.
  • We report the results of an extended spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star TAP 26, carried out within the MaTYSSE programme with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Applying Zeeman-Doppler Imaging to our observations, concentrating in 2015 November and 2016 January and spanning 72 d in total, 16 d in 2015 November and 13 d in 2016 January, we reconstruct surface brightness and magnetic field maps for both epochs and demonstrate that both distributions exhibit temporal evolution not explained by differential rotation alone. We report the detection of a hot Jupiter (hJ) around TAP 26 using three different methods, two using Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI) and one Gaussian-Process Regression (GPR), with a false-alarm probability smaller than 6.10^-4. However, as a result of the aliasing related to the observing window, the orbital period cannot be uniquely determined; the orbital period with highest likelihood is 10.79 +/- 0.14 d followed by 8.99 +/- 0.09 d. Assuming the most likely period, and that the planet orbits in the stellar equatorial plane, we obtain that the planet has a minimum mass M.sin(i) of 1.66 +/- 0.31 M_Jup and orbits at 0.0968 +/- 0.0032 au from its host star. This new detection suggests that disc type II migration is efficient at generating newborn hJs, and that hJs may be more frequent around young T Tauri stars than around mature stars (or that the MaTYSSE sample is biased towards hJ-hosting stars).
  • We describe seven exoplanets transiting stars of brightness V = 10.1 to 12.4. WASP-130b is a "warm Jupiter" having an orbital period of 11.6 d around a metal-rich G6 star. Its mass and radius (1.23 +/- 0.04 Mjup; 0.89 +/- 0.03 Rjup) support the trend that warm Jupiters have smaller radii than hot Jupiters. WASP-131b is a bloated Saturn-mass planet (0.27 Mjup; 1.22 Rjup). Its large scale height and bright (V = 10.1) host star make it a good target for atmospheric characterisation. WASP-132b (0.41 Mjup; 0.87 Rjup) is among the least irradiated and coolest of WASP planets, having a 7.1-d orbit around a K4 star. WASP-139b is a "super-Neptune" akin to HATS-7b and HATS-8b, being the lowest-mass planet yet found by WASP (0.12 Mjup; 0.80 Rjup). The metal-rich K0 host star appears to be anomalously dense, akin to HAT-P-11. WASP-140b is a 2.4-Mjup planet in an eccentric (e = 0.047 +/- 0.004) 2.2-d orbit. The planet's radius is large (1.4 Rjup), but uncertain owing to the grazing transit (b = 0.93). The 10.4-day rotation period of the K0 host star suggests a young age, and the timescale for tidal circularisation is likely to be the lowest of all known eccentric hot Jupiters. WASP-141b (2.7 Mjup, 1.2 Rjup, P = 3.3 d) and WASP-142b (0.84 Mjup, 1.53 Rjup, P = 2.1 d) are typical hot Jupiters orbiting metal-rich F stars. We show that the period distribution within the hot-Jupiter bulge does not depend on the metallicity of the host star.
  • We report three newly discovered exoplanets from the SuperWASP survey. WASP-127b is a heavily inflated super-Neptune of mass 0.18 +/- 0.02 M_J and radius 1.37 +/- 0.04 R_J. This is one of the least massive planets discovered by the WASP project. It orbits a bright host star (Vmag = 10.16) of spectral type G5 with a period of 4.17 days. WASP-127b is a low-density planet that has an extended atmosphere with a scale height of 2500 +/- 400 km, making it an ideal candidate for transmission spectroscopy. WASP-136b and WASP-138b are both hot Jupiters with mass and radii of 1.51 +/- 0.08 M_J and 1.38 +/- 0.16 R_J, and 1.22 +/- 0.08 M_J and 1.09 +/- 0.05 R_J, respectively. WASP-136b is in a 5.22-day orbit around an F9 subgiant star with a mass of 1.41 +/- 0.07 M_sun and a radius of 2.21 +/- 0.22 R_sun. The discovery of WASP-136b could help constrain the characteristics of the giant planet population around evolved stars. WASP-138b orbits an F7 star with a period of 3.63 days. Its radius agrees with theoretical values from standard models, suggesting the presence of a heavy element core with a mass of ~10 M_earth. The discovery of these new planets helps in exploring the diverse compositional range of short-period planets, and will aid our understanding of the physical characteristics of both gas giants and low-density planets.
  • We present the results of a study of a large sample of A and Am stars with spectral types from LAMOST and light curves from WASP. We find that, unlike normal A stars, $\delta$ Sct pulsations in Am stars are mostly confined to the effective temperature range 6900 $<$ $T_{\rm eff}$ $<$ 7600 K. We find evidence that the incidence of pulsations in Am stars decreases with increasing metallicism (degree of chemical peculiarity). The maximum amplitude of the pulsations in Am stars does not appear to vary significantly with metallicism. The amplitude distributions of the principal pulsation frequencies for both A and Am stars appear very similar and agree with results obtained from Kepler photometry. We present evidence that suggests turbulent pressure is the main driving mechanism in pulsating Am stars, rather than the $\kappa$-mechanism, which is expected to be suppressed by gravitational settling in these stars.
  • We present new measurements of the projected spin--orbit angle $\lambda$ for six WASP hot Jupiters, four of which are new to the literature (WASP-61, -62, -76, and -78), and two of which are new analyses of previously measured systems using new data (WASP-71, and -79). We use three different models based on two different techniques: radial velocity measurements of the Rossiter--McLaughlin effect, and Doppler tomography. Our comparison of the different models reveals that they produce projected stellar rotation velocities ($v \sin I_{\rm s}$) measurements often in disagreement with each other and with estimates obtained from spectral line broadening. The Bou\'e model for the Rossiter--McLaughlin effect consistently underestimates the value of $v\sin I_{\rm s}$ compared to the Hirano model. Although $v \sin I_s$ differed, the effect on $\lambda$ was small for our sample, with all three methods producing values in agreement with each other. Using Doppler tomography, we find that WASP-61\,b ($\lambda=4^\circ.0^{+17.1}_{-18.4}$), WASP-71\,b ($\lambda=-1^\circ.9^{+7.1}_{-7.5}$), and WASP-78\,b ($\lambda=-6^\circ.4\pm5.9$) are aligned. WASP-62\,b ($\lambda=19^\circ.4^{+5.1}_{-4.9}$) is found to be slightly misaligned, while WASP-79\,b ($\lambda=-95^\circ.2^{+0.9}_{-1.0}$) is confirmed to be strongly misaligned and has a retrograde orbit. We explore a range of possibilities for the orbit of WASP-76\,b, finding that the orbit is likely to be strongly misaligned in the positive $\lambda$ direction.
  • We report the discovery of two transiting planetary systems: a super dense, sub-Jupiter mass planet WASP-86b (\mpl\ = 0.82 $\pm$ 0.06 \mj, \rpl\ = 0.63 $\pm$ 0.01 \rj), and a bloated, Saturn-like planet WASP-102b (\mpl\ = 0.62 $\pm$ 0.04 \mj, \rpl\=1.27 $\pm$ 0.03 \rj). They orbit their host star every $\sim$5.03, and $\sim$2.71 days, respectively. The planet hosting WASP-86 is a F7 star (\teff\ = 6330$\pm$110 K, \feh\ = $+$0.23 $\pm$ 0.14 dex, and age $\sim$0.8--1~Gyr), WASP-102 is a G0 star (\teff\ = 5940$\pm$140 K, \feh\ = $-$0.09$\pm$ 0.19 dex, and age $\sim$1~Gyr). These two systems highlight the diversity of planetary radii over similar masses for giant planets with masses between Saturn and Jupiter. WASP-102b shows a larger than model-predicted radius, indicating that the planet is receiving a strong incident flux which contributes to the inflation of its radius. On the other hand, with a density of $\rho_{pl}$ = 3.24$\pm$~0.3~$\rho_{jup}$, WASP-86b is the densest gas giant planet among planets with masses in the range 0.05 $<M$_{pl}$<$ 2.0 \mj. With a stellar mass of 1.34 M$_{\odot}$ and \feh = $+$0.23 dex, WASP-86 could host additional massive and dense planets given that its protoplanetary disc is expected to also have been enriched with heavy elements. In order to match WASP-86b's density, an extrapolation of theoretical models predicts a planet composition of more than 80\% in heavy elements (whether confined in a core or mixed in the envelope). This fraction corresponds to a core mass of approximately 210\me\ for WASP-86b's mass of \mpl$\sim$260\,\me. Only planets with masses larger than about 2\mj\ have larger densities than that of WASP-86b, making it exceptional in its mass range.
  • We present the discovery and characterisation of the exoplanets WASP-113b and WASP-114b by the WASP survey, {\it SOPHIE} and {\it CORALIE}. The planetary nature of the systems was established by performing follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations. The follow-up data were combined with the WASP-photometry and analysed with an MCMC code to obtain system parameters. The host stars WASP-113 and WASP-114 are very similar. They are both early G-type stars with an effective temperature of $\sim 5900\,$K, [Fe/H]$\sim 0.12$ and $T_{\rm eff}$ $\sim 4.1$dex. However, WASP-113 is older than WASP-114. Although the planetary companions have similar radii, WASP-114b is almost 4 times heavier than WASP-113b. WASP-113b has a mass of $0.48\,$ $\mathrm{M}_{\rm Jup}$ and an orbital period of $\sim 4.5\,$days; WASP-114b has a mass of $1.77\,$ $\mathrm{M}_{\rm Jup}$ and an orbital period of $\sim 1.5\,$days. Both planets have inflated radii, in particular WASP-113 with a radius anomaly of $\Re=0.35$. The high scale height of WASP-113b ($\sim 950$ km ) makes it a good target for follow-up atmospheric observations.
  • We announce the discovery of the transiting hot Jupiter WASP-157b in a 3.95-d orbit around a V = 12.9 G2 main-sequence star. This moderately inflated planet has a Saturn-like density with a mass of $0.57 \pm 0.10$ M$_{\rm Jup}$ and a radius of $1.06 \pm 0.05$ R$_{\rm Jup}$. We do not detect any rotational or phase-curve modulations, nor the secondary eclipse, with conservative semi-amplitude upper limits of 250 and 20 ppm, respectively.
  • We use high quality K2 light curves for hundreds of stars in the Pleiades to understand better the angular momentum evolution and magnetic dynamos of young, low mass stars. The K2 light curves provide not only rotational periods but also detailed information from the shape of the phased light curve not available in previous studies. A slowly rotating sequence begins at $(V-K_{\rm s})_0\sim$1.1 (spectral type F5) and ends at $(V-K_{\rm s})_0\sim$ 3.7 (spectral type K8), with periods rising from $\sim$2 to $\sim$11 days in that interval. Fifty-two percent of the Pleiades members in that color interval have periods within 30\% of a curve defining the slow sequence; the slowly rotating fraction decreases significantly redward of $(V-K_{\rm s})_0$=2.6. Nearly all of the slow-sequence stars show light curves that evolve significantly on timescales less than the K2 campaign duration. The majority of the FGK Pleiades members identified as photometric binaries are relatively rapidly rotating, perhaps because binarity inhibits star-disk angular momentum loss mechanisms during pre-main sequence evolution. The fully convective, late M dwarf Pleiades members (5.0 $<(V-K_{\rm s})_0<$ 6.0) nearly always show stable light curves, with little spot evolution or evidence of differential rotation. During PMS evolution from $\sim$3 Myr (NGC2264 age) to $\sim$125 Myr (Pleiades age), stars of 0.3 $M_{\odot}$ shed about half their angular momentum, with the fractional change in period between 3 and 125 Myr being nearly independent of mass for fully convective stars. Our data also suggest that very low mass binaries form with rotation periods more similar to each other and faster than would be true if drawn at random from the parent population of single stars.
  • Young (125 Myr), populous ($>$1000 members), and relatively nearby, the Pleiades has provided an anchor for stellar angular momentum models for both younger and older stars. We used K2 to explore the distribution of rotation periods in the Pleiades. With more than 500 new periods for Pleiades members, we are vastly expanding the number of Pleiads with periods, particularly at the low mass end. About 92\% of the members in our sample have at least one measured spot-modulated rotation period. For the $\sim$8\% of the members without periods, non-astrophysical effects often dominate (saturation, etc.), such that periodic signals might have been detectable, all other things being equal. We now have an unusually complete view of the rotation distribution in the Pleiades. The relationship between $P$ and $(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ follows the overall trends found in other Pleiades studies. There is a slowly rotating sequence for $1.1\lesssim(V-K_{\rm s})_0\lesssim 3.7$, and a primarily rapidly rotating population for $(V-K_{\rm s})_0\gtrsim 5.0$. There is a region in which there seems to be a disorganized relationship between $P$ and $(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ for $3.7 \lesssim(V-K_{\rm s})_0\lesssim 5.0$. Paper II continues the discussion, focusing on multi-period structures, and Paper III speculates about the origin and evolution of the period distribution in the Pleiades.
  • We use K2 to continue the exploration of the distribution of rotation periods in Pleiades that we began in Paper I. We have discovered complicated multi-period behavior in Pleiades stars using these K2 data, and we have grouped them into categories, which are the focal part of this paper. About 24% of the sample has multiple, real frequencies in the periodogram, sometimes manifesting as obvious beating in the light curves. Those having complex and/or structured periodogram peaks, unresolved multiple periods, and resolved close multiple periods are likely due to spot/spot group evolution and/or latitudinal differential rotation; these largely compose the slowly rotating sequence in $P$ vs.~$(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ identified in Paper I. The fast sequence in $P$ vs.~$(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ is dominated by single-period stars; these are likely to be rotating as solid bodies. Paper III continues the discussion, speculating about the origin and evolution of the period distribution in the Pleiades.