• We prove a general normal approximation theorem for local graph statistics in the configuration model, together with an explicit bound on the error in the approximation with respect to the Wasserstein metric. Such statistics take the form $T := \sum_{v \in V} H_v$, where $V$ is the vertex set, and $H_v$ depends on a neighbourhood in the graph around $v$ of size at most $\ell$. The error bound is expressed in terms of $\ell$, $|V|$, an almost sure bound on $H_v$, the maximum vertex degree $d_{\max}$ and the variance of $T$. Under suitable assumptions on the convergence of the empirical degree distributions to a limiting distribution, we deduce that the size of the giant component in the configuration model has asymptotically Gaussian fluctuations.
  • The Aldous gossip process represents the dissemination of information in geographical space as a process of locally deterministic spread, augmented by random long range transmissions. Starting from a single initially informed individual, the proportion of individuals informed follows an almost deterministic path, but for a random time shift, caused by the stochastic behaviour in the very early stages of development. In this paper, it is shown that, even with the extra information available after a substantial development time, this broad description remains accurate to first order. However, the precision of the prediction is now much greater, and the random time shift is shown to have an approximately normal distribution, with mean and variance that can be computed from the current state of the process.
  • We derive explicit central moment inequalities for random variables that admit a Stein coupling, such as exchangeable pairs, size-bias couplings or local dependence, among others. The bounds are in terms of moments (not necessarily central) of variables in the Stein coupling, which are typically positive or local in some sense, and therefore easier to bound. In cases where the Stein couplings have the kind of behaviour leading to good normal approximation, the central moments are closely bounded by those of a normal. We show how the bounds can be used to produce concentration inequalities, and compare to those existing in related settings. Finally, we illustrate the power of the theory by bounding the central moments of sums of neighbourhood statistics in sparse Erd\H{o}s--R\'enyi random graphs.
  • We provide a general result for bounding the difference between point probabilities of integer supported distributions and the translated Poisson distribution, a convenient alternative to the discretized normal. We illustrate our theorem in the context of the Hoeffding combinatorial central limit theorem with integer valued summands, of the number of isolated vertices in an Erd\H{o}s-R\'enyi random graph, and of the Curie-Weiss model of magnetism, where we provide optimal or near optimal rates of convergence in the local limit metric. In the Hoeffding example, even the discrete normal approximation bounds seem to be new. The general result follows from Stein's method, and requires a new bound on the Stein solution for the Poisson distribution, which is of general interest.
  • For integer valued random variables, the translated Poisson distributions form a flexible family for approximation in total variation, in much the same way that the normal family is used for approximation in Kolmogorov distance. Using the Stein--Chen method, approximation can often be achieved with error bounds of the same order as those for the CLT. In this paper, an analogous theory, again based on Stein's method, is developed in the multivariate context. The approximating family consists of the equilibrium distributions of a collection of Markov jump processes, whose analogues in one dimension are the immigration--death processes with Poisson distributions as equilibria. The method is illustrated by providing total variation error bounds for the approximation of the equilibrium distribution of one Markov jump process by that of another. In a companion paper, it is shown how to use the method for discrete normal approximation in ${\mathbb Z}^d$.
  • The paper applies the theory developed in Part I to the discrete normal approximation in total variation of random vectors in ${\mathbb Z}^d$. We illustrate the use of the method for sums of independent integer valued random vectors, and for random vectors exhibiting an exchangeable pair. We conclude with an application to random colourings of regular graphs.
  • We consider the motion of a particle on a Galton Watson tree, when the probabilities of jumping from a vertex to any one of its neighbours is determined by a random process. Given the tree, positive weights are assigned to the edges in such a way that, viewed along any line of descent, they evolve as a random process. In order to introduce our method for proving transience or recurrence, we first suppose that the weights are i.i.d., reproving a result of Lyons and Pemantle. We then extend the argument to allow a Markovian environment, and finally to a random walk on a Markovian environment that changes the environment. Our approach involves studying the typical behaviour of processes on fixed lines of descent, which we then show determines the behaviour of the process on the whole tree.
  • The paper presents a phenomenon occurring in population processes that start near zero and have large carrying capacity. By the classical result of Kurtz~(1970), such processes, normalized by the carrying capacity, converge on finite intervals to the solutions of ordinary differential equations, also known as the fluid limit. When the initial population is small relative to carrying capacity, this limit is trivial. Here we show that, viewed at suitably chosen times increasing to infinity, the process converges to the fluid limit, governed by the same dynamics, but with a random initial condition. This random initial condition is related to the martingale limit of an associated linear birth and death process.
  • Density dependent Markov population processes in large populations of size $N$ were shown by Kurtz (1970, 1971) to be well approximated over finite time intervals by the solution of the differential equations that describe their average drift, and to exhibit stochastic fluctuations about this deterministic solution on the scale $\sqrt N$ that can be approximated by a diffusion process. Here, motivated by an example from evolutionary biology, we are concerned with describing how such a process leaves an absorbing boundary. Initially, one or more of the populations is of size much smaller than $N$, and the length of time taken until all populations have sizes comparable to $N$ then becomes infinite as $N \to \infty$. Under suitable assumptions, we show that in the early stages of development, up to the time when all populations have sizes at least $N^{1-\alpha}$, for $1/3 < \alpha < 1$, the process can be accurately approximated in total variation by a Markov branching process. Thereafter, the process is well approximated by the deterministic solution starting from the original initial point, but with a random time delay. Analogous behaviour is also established for a Markov process approaching an equilibrium on a boundary, where one or more of the populations become extinct.
  • Density dependent Markov population processes with countably many types can often be well approximated over finite time intervals by the solution of the differential equations that describe their average drift, provided that the total population size is large. They also exhibit diffusive stochastic fluctuations on a smaller scale about this deterministic path. Here, it is shown that the individuals in such processes experience an almost deterministic environment. Small groups of individuals behave almost independently of one another, evolving as Markov jump processes, whose transition rates are prescribed functions of time. In the context of metapopulation models, we show that `individuals' can represent either patches or the individuals that migrate among the patches; in host--parasite systems, they can represent both hosts and parasites.
  • Both small world models of random networks with occasional long range connections and gossip processes with occasional long range transmission of information have similar characteristic behaviour. The long range elements appreciably reduce the effective distances, measured in space or in time, between pairs of typical points. In this paper, we show that their common behaviour can be interpreted as a product of the locally branching nature of the models. In particular, it is shown that both typical distances between points and the proportion of space that can be reached within a given distance or time can be approximated by formulae involving the limit random variable of the branching process.
  • Many models of epidemic spread have a common qualitative structure. The numbers of infected individuals during the initial stages of an epidemic can be well approximated by a branching process, after which the proportion of individuals that are susceptible follows a more or less deterministic course. In this paper, we show that both of these features are consequences of assuming a locally branching structure in the models, and that the deterministic course can itself be determined from the distribution of the limiting random variable associated with the backward, susceptibility branching process. Examples considered include a stochastic version of the Kermack & McKendrick model, the Reed-Frost model, and the Volz configuration model.
  • Quasi-stationary distributions, as discussed by Darroch & Seneta (1965), have been used in biology to describe the steady state behaviour of population models which, while eventually certain to become extinct, nevertheless maintain an apparent stochastic equilibrium for long periods. These distributions have some drawbacks: they need not exist, nor be unique, and their calculation can present problems. In an earlier paper, we gave biologically plausible conditions under which the quasi-stationary distribution is unique, and can be closely approximated by distributions that are simple to compute. In this paper, we consider conditions under which the quasi-stationary distribution, if it exists, need not be unique, but an apparent stochastic equilibrium can nonetheless be identified and computed; we call such a distribution a quasi-equilibrium distribution.
  • When approximating the joint distribution of the component counts of a decomposable combinatorial structure that is `almost' in the logarithmic class, but nonetheless has irregular structure, it is useful to be able first to establish that the distribution of a certain sum of non-negative integer valued random variables is smooth. This distribution is not like the normal, and individual summands can contribute a non-trivial amount to the whole, so its smoothness is somewhat surprising. In this paper, we consider two coupling approaches to establishing the smoothness, and contrast the results that are obtained.
  • Quasi-logarithmic combinatorial structures are a class of decomposable combinatorial structures which extend the logarithmic class considered by Arratia, Barbour and Tavar\'{e} (2003). In order to obtain asymptotic approximations to their component spectrum, it is necessary first to establish an approximation to the sum of an associated sequence of independent random variables in terms of the Dickman distribution. This in turn requires an argument that refines the Mineka coupling by incorporating a blocking construction, leading to exponentially sharper coupling rates for the sums in question. Applications include distributional limit theorems for the size of the largest component and for the vector of counts of the small components in a quasi-logarithmic combinatorial structure.
  • The dynamics of tumour evolution are not well understood. In this paper we provide a statistical framework for evaluating the molecular variation observed in different parts of a colorectal tumour. A multi-sample version of the Ewens Sampling Formula forms the basis for our modelling of the data, and we provide a simulation procedure for use in obtaining reference distributions for the statistics of interest. We also describe the large-sample asymptotics of the joint distributions of the variation observed in different parts of the tumour. While actual data should be evaluated with reference to the simulation procedure, the asymptotics serve to provide theoretical guidelines, for instance with reference to the choice of possible statistics.
  • Quasi-stationary distributions, as discussed by Darroch & Seneta (1965), have been used in biology to describe the steady state behaviour of population models which, while eventually certain to become extinct, nevertheless maintain an apparent stochastic equilibrium for long periods. These distributions have some drawbacks: they need not exist, nor be unique, and their calculation can present problems. In this paper, we give biologically plausible conditions under which the quasi-stationary distribution is unique, and can be closely approximated by distributions that are simple to compute.
  • Using an associated branching process as the basis of our approximation, we show that typical inter-point distances in a multitype random intersection graph have a defective distribution, which is well described by a mixture of translated and scaled Gumbel distributions, the missing mass corresponding to the event that the vertices are not in the same component of the graph.
  • The paper establishes a functional version of the Hoeffding combinatorial central limit theorem. First, a pre-limiting Gaussian process approximation is defined, and is shown to be at a distance of the order of the Lyapounov ratio from the original random process. Distance is measured by comparison of expectations of smooth functionals of the processes, and the argument is by way of Stein's method. The pre-limiting process is then shown, under weak conditions, to converge to a Gaussian limit process. The theorem is used to describe the shape of random permutation tableaux.
  • The paper concerns the classical occupancy scheme with infinitely many boxes. We establish approximations to the distributions of the number of occupied boxes, and of the number of boxes containing exactly r balls, within the family of translated Poisson distributions. These are shown to be of ideal asymptotic order, with respect both to total variation distance and to the approximation of point probabilities. The proof is probabilistic, making use of a translated Poisson approximation theorem of R\"ollin (2005).
  • The paper is concerned with the equilibrium distributions of continuous-time density dependent Markov processes on the integers. These distributions are known typically to be approximately normal, and the approximation error, as measured in Kolmogorov distance, is of the smallest order that is compatible with their having integer support. Here, an approximation in the much stronger total variation norm is established, without any loss in the asymptotic order of accuracy; the approximating distribution is a translated Poisson distribution having the same variance and (almost) the same mean. Our arguments are based on the Stein-Chen method and Dynkin's formula.
  • The paper is concerned with the equilibrium distribution $\Pi_n$ of the $n$-th element in a sequence of continuous-time density dependent Markov processes on the integers. Under a $(2+\a)$-th moment condition on the jump distributions, we establish a bound of order $O(n^{-(\a+1)/2}\sqrt{\log n})$ on the difference between the point probabilities of $\Pi_n$ and those of a translated Poisson distribution with the same variance. Except for the factor $\sqrt{\log n}$, the result is as good as could be obtained in the simpler setting of sums of independent integer-valued random variables. Our arguments are based on the Stein-Chen method and coupling.
  • In modeling parasitic diseases, it is natural to distinguish hosts according to the number of parasites that they carry, leading to a countably infinite type space. Proving the analogue of the deterministic equations, used in models with finitely many types as a "law of large numbers" approximation to the underlying stochastic model, has previously either been done case by case, using some special structure, or else not attempted. In this paper we prove a general theorem of this sort, and complement it with a rate of convergence in the $\ell_1$-norm.
  • The paper is concerned with approximating the distribution of a sum W of n integer valued random variables Y_i, whose distributions depend on the state of an underlying Markov chain X. The approximation is in terms of a translated Poisson distribution, with mean and variance chosen to be close to those of W, and the error is measured with respect to the total variation norm. Error bounds comparable to those found for normal approximation with respect to the weaker Kolmogorov distance are established, provided that the distribution of the sum of the Y_i's between the successive visits of X to a reference state is aperiodic. Without this assumption, approximation in total variation cannot be expected to be good.
  • Branching process approximation to the initial stages of an epidemic process has been used since the 1950's as a technique for providing stochastic counterparts to deterministic epidemic threshold theorems. One way of describing the approximation is to construct both branching and epidemic processes on the same probability space, in such a way that their paths coincide for as long as possible. In this paper, it is shown, in the context of a Markovian model of parasitic infection, that coincidence can be achieved with asymptotically high probability until o(N^{2/3}) infections have occurred, where N denotes the total number of hosts.