• We present observations of the Type Ia supernovae (SNe) 1999M, 1999N, 1999Q, 1999S, and 1999U, at redshift z~0.5. They were discovered in early 1999 with the 4.0~m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory by the High-z Supernova Search Team (HZT) and subsequently followed with many ground-based telescopes. SNe 1999Q and 1999U were also observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. We computed luminosity distances to the new SNe using two methods, and added them to the high-z Hubble diagram that the HZT has been constructing since 1995. The new distance moduli confirm the results of previous work. At z~0.5, luminosity distances are larger than those expected for an empty universe, implying that a ``Cosmological Constant,'' or another form of ``dark energy,'' has been increasing the expansion rate of the Universe during the last few billion years.
  • GRB 000926 has one of the best-studied afterglows to-date, with multiple X-ray observations, as well as extensive multi-frequency optical and radio coverage. Broadband afterglow observations, spanning from X-ray to radio frequencies, provide a probe of the density structure of the circumburst medium, as well as of the ejecta energetics, geometry, and the physical parameters of the relativistic blastwave resulting from the explosion. We present an analysis of {\em Chandra X-ray Observatory} observations of this event, along with {\em Hubble Space Telescope} and radio monitoring. We combine these data with ground-based optical and IR observations and fit the synthesized afterglow lightcurve using models where collimated ejecta expand into a surrounding medium. We find that we can explain the broadband lightcurve with reasonable physical parameters only if the cooling is dominated by inverse Compton scattering. Excess X-ray emission in the broadband spectrum indicates that we are directly observing a contribution from inverse Compton scattering. It is the first time this has been observed in a GRB afterglow, and it implies that the GRB exploded in a reasonably dense (n~30 cm^{-3}) medium, consistent with a diffuse interstellar cloud environment.
  • We report on optical, near-infrared and centimeter radio observations of GRB000418 which allow us to follow the evolution of the afterglow from 2 to 200 days after the gamma-ray burst. In modeling these broad-band data, we find that an isotropic explosion in a constant density medium is unable to simultaneously fit both the radio and optical data. However, a jet-like outflow with an opening angle of 10-20 degress provides a good description of the data. The evidence in favor of a jet interpretation is based on the behavior of the radio light curves, since the expected jet break is masked at optical wavelengths by the light of the host galaxy. We also find evidence for extinction, presumably arising from within the host galaxy, with A(V)=0.4 mag, and host flux densities of F_R=1.1 uJy and F_K=1.7 uJy. These values supercede previous work on this burst due to the availability of a broad-band data set allowing a global fitting approach. A model in which the GRB explodes into a wind-stratified circumburst medium cannot be ruled out by these data. However, in examining a sample of other bursts (e.g. GRB990510, GRB000301C) we favor the jet interpretation for GRB000418.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most brilliant objects in the Universe but efforts to estimate the total energy released in the explosion -- a crucial physical quantity -- have been stymied by their unknown geometry: spheres or cones. We report on a comprehensive analysis of GRB afterglows and derive their conical opening angles. We find that the gamma-ray energy release, corrected for geometry, is narrowly clustered around 5x10**50 erg. We draw three conclusions. First, the central engines of GRBs release energies that are comparable to ordinary supernovae, suggesting a connection. Second, the wide variation in fluence and luminosity of GRBs is due entirely to a distribution of opening angles. Third, only a small fraction of GRBs are visible to a given observer and the true GRB rate is at least a factor of 500 times larger than the observed rate.
  • We present multi-color light-curves of the optical afterglow of GRB 000926. Beginning ~1.5 days after the burst, the light-curves of this GRB steepen measurably. The existence of such achromatic breaks are usually taken to be an important observational signature that the ejecta are not expanding isotropically, but rather have a collimated jet-like geometry. If we interpret the data in this context, we derive an opening angle of 5 degrees, which reduces the energy release compared to an isotropic model by a factor of ~275, to 1.7 x 10^51 erg. To fit the data with a simple jet model requires extinction along the line of sight. The derived A_V is in the range 0.11 - 0.82 mag, depending on the adopted extinction law and whether the electrons giving rise to the optical emission are undergoing synchrotron cooling or not. Since this is in excess of the expected extinction from our Galaxy, we attribute this to the GRB host. We note that this extinction is typical of a galactic disk, and therefore the event likely took place in the disk of its host.
  • The optical light curve of the energetic gamma-ray burst GRB 991216 is consistent with jet-like behavior in which a power-law decay steepens from t**(-1.22 +/- 0.04) at early times to t**(-1.53 +/- 0.05) in a gradual transition at around 2 d. The derivation of the late-time decay slope takes into account the constant contribution of a host or intervening galaxy which was measured 110 d after the event at R = 24.56 +/- 0.14, although the light curve deviates from a single power law whether or not a constant term is included. The early-time spectral energy distribution of the afterglow can be described as F_nu ~ nu**(-0.74 +/- 0.05) or flatter between optical and X-ray, which, together with the slow initial decay, is characteristic of standard adiabatic evolution in a uniformly dense medium. Assuming that a reported absorption-line redshift of 1.02 is correct, the apparent isotropic energy of 6.7 x 10**53 erg is reduced by a factor of ~ 200 in the jet model, and the initial half-opening angle is ~ 6 deg. GRB 991216 is the third good example of a jet-like afterglow (following GRB 990123 and GRB 990510), supporting a trend in which the apparently most energetic gamma-ray events have the narrowest collimation and a uniform ISM environment. This, plus the absence of evidence for supernovae associated with jet-like afterglows, suggests that these events may originate from a progenitor in which angular momentum plays an important role but a massive stellar envelope or wind does not, e.g., the coalescence of a compact binary.
  • We present broad-band radio observations of the afterglow of GRB000301C, spanning from 1.4 to 350 GHz for the period of 3 to 83 days after the burst. This radio data, in addition to measurements at the optical bands, suggest that the afterglow arises from a collimated outflow, i.e. a jet. To test this hypothesis in a self-consistent manner, we employ a global fit and find that a model of a jet, expanding into a constant density medium (ISM+jet), provides the best fit to the data. A model of the burst occurring in a wind-shaped circumburst medium (wind-only model) can be ruled out, and a wind+jet model provides a much poorer fit of the optical/IR data than the ISM+jet model. In addition, we present the first clear indication that the reported fluctuations in the optical/IR are achromatic with similar amplitudes in all bands, and possibly extend into the radio regime. Using the parameters derived from the global fit, in particular a jet break time, t_{jet}=7.5 days, we infer a jet opening angle of \theta=0.2, and consequently the estimate of the emitted energy in the GRB itself is reduced by a factor of 50 relative to the isotropic value, giving E=1.1 \times 10^{51} ergs.
  • Gamma-ray burst astronomy has undergone a revolution in the last three years, spurred by the discovery of fading long-wavelength counterparts. We now know that at least the long duration GRBs lie at cosmological distances with estimated electromagnetic energy release of 10**51 -- 10**53 erg, making these the brightest explosions in the Universe. In this article we review the current observational state, beginning with the statistics of X-ray, optical, and radio afterglow detections. We then discuss the insights these observations have given to the progenitor population, the energetics of the GRB events, and the physics of the afterglow emission. We focus particular attention on the evidence linking GRBs to the explosion of massive stars. Throughout, we identify remaining puzzles and uncertainties, and emphasize promising observational tools for addressing them. The imminent launch of HETE-2 and the increasingly sophisticated and coordinated ground-based and space-based observations have primed this field for fantastic growth.
  • We present an R-band and J-band photometry of an optical transient which is likely to be associated with the gamma-ray burst event GRB 971214. Our first measurement took place 13 hours after the gamma-ray event. The brightness decayed with a power-law exponent alpha = -1.20 +- 0.02, which is similar to those of GRB 970228 and GRB 970508 which had exponents of alpha = -1.10 +- 0.04 and alpha = -1.141 +- 0.014 respectively. The transient decayed monotonically during the first four days following the gamma-ray event in contrast with the optical transient associated with GRB 970508 which increased in brightness, peaking two days after the burst, before settling to a power-law decay.
  • We use Type Ia supernovae studied by the High-Z Supernova Search Team to constrain the properties of an energy component which may have contributed to accelerating the cosmic expansion. We find that for a flat geometry the equation of state parameter for the unknown component, alpha_x=P_x/rho_x, must be less than -0.55 (95% confidence) for any value of Omega_m and is further limited to alpha_x<-0.60 (95%) if Omega_m is assumed to be greater than 0.1 . These values are inconsistent with the unknown component being topological defects such as domain walls, strings, or textures. The supernova data are consistent with a cosmological constant (alpha_x=-1) or a scalar field which has had, on average, an equation of state parameter similar to the cosmological constant value of -1 over the redshift range of z=1 to the present. Supernova and cosmic microwave background observations give complementary constraints on the densities of matter and the unknown component. If only matter and vacuum energy are considered, then the current combined data sets provide direct evidence for a spatially flat Universe with Omega_tot=Omega_m+Omega_Lambda = 0.94 +/- 0.26 (1-sigma).