• Computer simulations of first-order relaxation processes show that the spatial configurations of the system acquire an invariant shape once the stationary regime is attained. Inspired by them we find that, in any first-order relaxation process, if the interaction that governs the system fulfils a simple scale property, then the relaxation will end up by following a stationary process described by a power law. A scaling law and some invariants are obtained for the time evolution of the system in such a case.
  • We report a rather high dependence of the dielectric permittivity on the magnetic field in La2/3Ca1/3MnO3. The variation is maximum at around 270 K, little above the Curie temperature, TC, and it reaches a 30% under only 0.5 T. We attribute this phenomenon to the space-charge or interfacial polarization produced between the insulator and the metallic regions segregated intrinsically in the material above TC.
  • Starting from a simple definition of stationary regime in first-order relaxation processes, we obtain that experimental results are to be fitted to a power-law when approaching the stationary limit. On the basis of this result we propose a graphical representation that allows the discrimination between power-law and stretched exponential time decays. Examples of fittings of magnetic, dielectric and simulated relaxation data support the results.
  • We are reporting the dielectric response of La1.5Sr0.5NiO4, a system that presents a charge-ordered state above room temperature and a rearrangement of its charge-order pattern in the temperature region 160-200 K. A careful analysis of the role of the electric contacts used, sample thickness and grain size on the experimental data allows us to determine that this material exhibits high values of intrinsic dielectric constant. The variation of the dielectric constant with temperature shows a maximum in the region of the rearrangement of the charge-order pattern, which constitutes an evidence of the link between both phenomena.
  • MnAs exhibits a first-order phase transition from a ferromagnetic, high-spin metal NiAs-type hexagonal phase to a paramagnetic, lower-spin insulator MnP-type orthorhombic phase at T_C = 313 K. Here, we report the results of neutron diffraction experiments showing that an external magnetic field, B, stabilizes the hexagonal metallic phase above T_C. The phase transformation is reversible and constitutes the first demonstration of a bond-breaking transition induced by a magnetic field. At 322 K the hexagonal structure is restored for B > 4 tesla. The field-induced phase transition is accompanied by an enhanced magnetoresistance of about 17 % at 310 K. We discuss the origin of this phenomenon, which appears to be similar to that of the colossal magnetoresistance response observed in some members of the manganese perovskite family.