• We report on the serendipitous discovery of a z=4.0, M1500=-22.20 star-forming galaxy (Ion3) showing copious Lyman continuum (LyC) leakage (~60% escaping), a remarkable multiple peaked Lya emission, and significant Lya radiation directly emerging at the resonance frequency. This is the highest redshift confirmed LyC emitter in which the ionising and Lya radiation possibly share a common ionised cavity (with N_HI<10^17.2 cm^-2). Ion3 is spatially resolved, it shows clear stellar winds signatures like the P-Cygni NV1240 profile, and has blue ultraviolet continuum (\beta = -2.5 +/- 0.25, F_\lambda~ \lambda^\beta) with weak low-ionisation interstellar metal lines. Deep VLT/HAWKI Ks and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6um and 4.5um imaging show a clear photometric signature of the Halpha line with equivalent width of 1000A rest-frame emerging over a flat continuum (Ks-4.5um ~ 0). From the SED fitting we derive a stellar mass of 1.5x10^9 Msun, SFR of 140 Msun/yr and age of ~10 Myr, with a low dust extinction, E(B-V)< 0.1, placing the source in the starburst region of the SFR-M^* plane. Ion3 shows similar properties of another LyC emitter previously discovered (z=3.21, Ion2, Vanzella et al. 2016). Ion3 (and Ion2) represents ideal high-redshift reference cases to guide the search for reionising sources at z>6.5 with JWST.
  • This paper describes the observations and the first data release (DR1) of the ESO public spectroscopic survey "VANDELS, a deep VIMOS survey of the CANDELS CDFS and UDS fields". VANDELS' main targets are star-forming galaxies at 2.4<z<5.5 and massive passive galaxies at 1<z<2.5. By adopting a strategy of ultra-long exposure times, from 20 to 80 hours per source, VANDELS is designed to be the deepest ever spectroscopic survey of the high-redshift Universe. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the VIMOS spectrograph, the survey has obtained ultra-deep spectra covering the wavelength 4800-10000 A with sufficient signal-to-noise to investigate the astrophysics of high-redshift galaxy evolution via detailed absorption line studies. The VANDELS-DR1 is the release of all spectra obtained during the first season of observations and includes data for galaxies for which the total (or half of the total) scheduled integration time was completed. The release contains 879 individual objects with a measured redshift and includes fully wavelength and flux-calibrated 1D spectra, the associated error spectra, sky spectra and wavelength-calibrated 2D spectra. We also provide a catalog with the essential galaxy parameters, including spectroscopic redshifts and redshift quality flags. In this paper we present the survey layout and observations, the data reduction and redshift measurement procedure and the general properties of the VANDELS-DR1 sample. We also discuss the spectroscopic redshift distribution, the accuracy of the photometric redshifts and we provide some examples of data products. All VANDELS-DR1 data are publicly available and can be retrieved from the ESO archive. Two further data releases are foreseen in the next 2 years with a final release scheduled for June 2020 which will include improved re-reduction of the entire spectroscopic data set. (abridged)
  • VANDELS is a uniquely-deep spectroscopic survey of high-redshift galaxies with the VIMOS spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The survey has obtained ultra-deep optical (0.48 < lambda < 1.0 micron) spectroscopy of ~2100 galaxies within the redshift interval 1.0 < z < 7.0, over a total area of ~0.2 sq. degrees centred on the CANDELS UDS and CDFS fields. Based on accurate photometric redshift pre-selection, 85% of the galaxies targeted by VANDELS were selected to be at z>=3. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the refurbished VIMOS spectrograph, the fundamental aim of the survey is to provide the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra necessary to measure key physical properties such as stellar population ages, masses, metallicities and outflow velocities from detailed absorption-line studies. Using integration times calculated to produce an approximately constant signal-to-noise ratio (20 < t_int < 80 hours), the VANDELS survey targeted: a) bright star-forming galaxies at 2.4 < z < 5.5, b) massive quiescent galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.5, c) fainter star-forming galaxies at 3.0 < z < 7.0 and d) X-ray/Spitzer-selected active galactic nuclei and Herschel-detected galaxies. By targeting two extragalactic survey fields with superb multi-wavelength imaging data, VANDELS will produce a unique legacy data set for exploring the physics underpinning high-redshift galaxy evolution. In this paper we provide an overview of the VANDELS survey designed to support the science exploitation of the first ESO public data release, focusing on the scientific motivation, survey design and target selection.
  • Producing positronium (Ps) in the metastable $2^3\text{S}$ state is of interest for various applications in fundamental physics. We report here about an experiment in which Ps atoms are produced in this long-lived state by spontaneous radiative decay of Ps excited to the $3^3\text{P}$ level manifold. The Ps cloud excitation is obtained with a UV laser pulse in an experimental vacuum chamber in presence of guiding magnetic field of 25 mT and an average electric field of 300 V/cm. The indication of the $2^3\text{S}$ state production is obtained from a novel analysis technique of single-shot positronium annihilation lifetime spectra. Its production efficiency relative to the total amount of formed Ps is evaluated by fitting a simple rate equations model to the experimental data and found to be $ (2.1 \pm 1.3) \, \% $.
  • Finding the sources responsible for the hydrogen reionization is one of the most pressing issues in cosmology. Bright QSOs are known to ionize their surrounding neighborhood, but they are too few to ensure the required HI ionizing background. A significant contribution by faint AGNs, however, could solve the problem, as recently advocated on the basis of a relatively large space density of faint active nuclei at z>4. We have carried out an exploratory spectroscopic program to measure the HI ionizing emission of 16 faint AGNs spanning a broad U-I color interval, with I~21-23 and 3.6<z<4.2. These AGNs are three magnitudes fainter than the typical SDSS QSOs (M1450<~-26) which are known to ionize their surrounding IGM at z>~4. The LyC escape fraction has been detected with S/N ratio of ~10-120 and is between 44 and 100% for all the observed faint AGNs, with a mean value of 74% at 3.6<z<4.2 and -25.1<M1450<-23.3, in agreement with the value found in the literature for much brighter QSOs (M1450<~-26) at the same redshifts. The LyC escape fraction of our faint AGNs does not show any dependence on the absolute luminosities or on the observed U-I colors. Assuming that the LyC escape fraction remains close to ~75% down to M1450~-18, we find that the AGN population can provide between 16 and 73% (depending on the adopted luminosity function) of the whole ionizing UV background at z~4, measured through the Lyman forest. This contribution increases to 25-100% if other determinations of the ionizing UV background are adopted. Extrapolating these results to z~5-7, there are possible indications that bright QSOs and faint AGNs can provide a significant contribution to the reionization of the Universe, if their space density is high at M1450~-23.
  • The fraction of Lyman-$\alpha$ emitters among the galaxy population has been found to increase from $z\sim0$ to $z\sim6$ and drop dramatically at $z>6$. This drop has been interpreted as an effect of an increasingly neutral intergalactic medium with increasing redshift, while a LyC escape fraction evolving with redshift. We report the result of a large VLT/FORS2 program aiming to confirm spectroscopically a large galaxy sample at $z\geq6$ that has been selected in several independent fields through the Lyman Break technique. Combining those data with archival data, we create a large and homogeneous sample of $z\sim6$ galaxies ($N=127$), complete in terms of Ly$\alpha$ detection at $>95\%$ for EW(Ly$\alpha)\geq25\AA$. We use this sample to derive a new measurement of the LAE fraction at $z\sim6$ and derive the physical properties of these galaxies through spectral energy distribution fitting. We find a median LAE fraction at $z\sim6$ lower than in previous studies. The main difference between LAEs and non-LAEs is that the latter are significantly dustier. Using predictions of our SED fitting code accounting for nebular emission, we find an effective Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction $f^{eff}_{esc}(Ly\alpha)=0.23^{+0.36}_{-0.17}$ remarkably consistent with the value derived by comparing UV luminosity function with Ly$\alpha$ luminosity function. We conclude that the drop in the LAE fraction from $z\sim6$ to $z>6$ is less dramatic than previously found and the effect of an increasing IGM neutral fraction is possibly observed at $5<z<6$. Based on our derived $f^{eff}_{esc}(Ly\alpha)$, we find that the IGM has a relatively small impact on Ly$\alpha$ photon visibility at $z\sim6$, with a lower limit for the IGM transmission to \lya\ photons, $T_{IGM}\gtrsim0.20$, likely due to the presence of outflows. [abdridged]
  • We search for passive galaxies at $z>3$ in the GOODS-South field, using different techniques based on photometric data, and paying attention to develop methods that are sensitive to objects that have become passive shortly before the epoch of observation. We use CANDELS HST catalogues, ultra-deep $Ks$ data and new IRAC photometry, performing spectral energy distribution fitting using models with abruptly quenched star formation histories. We then single out galaxies which are best fitted by a passively evolving model, and having only low probability $( < 5 \%)$ star-forming solutions. We verify the effects of including nebular lines emission, and we consider possible solutions at different redshifts. The number of selected sources dramatically depends on the models used in the SED fitting. Without including emission lines and with photometric redshifts fixed at the CANDELS estimate, we single out 30 candidates; the inclusion of nebular lines emission reduces the sample to 10 objects; allowing for solutions at different redshifts, only 2 galaxies survive as robust candidates. Most of the candidates are not far-infrared emitters, corroborating their association with passive galaxies. Our results translate into an upper limit in the number density of $\sim 0.173$ arcmin$^2$ above the detection limit. However, we conclude that the selection of passive galaxies at $z>3$ is still subject to significant uncertainties, being sensitive to assumptions in the SED modeling adopted and to the relatively low S/N of the objects. By means of dedicated simulations, we show that JWST will greatly enhance the accuracy, allowing for a much more robust classification.
  • We report the discovery of 11 very faint (r< 23), low surface brightness ({\mu}_r< 27 mag/arcsec^2) dwarf galaxies in one deep field in the Virgo cluster, obtained by the prime focus cameras (LBC) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). These extend our previous sample to reach a total number of 27 galaxies in a field of just of 0.17 deg^2 located at a median distance of 390 kpc from the cluster center. Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their separate position in the central surface brightness - total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. For a significant fraction (26\%) of the sample the association to the cluster is confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up. We show that the mere abundance of satellite galaxies corresponding to our observed number in the target field provides extremely tight constraints on Dark Matter models with suppressed power spectrum compared to the Cold Dark Matter case, independently of the galaxy luminosity distribution. In particular, requiring the observed number of satellite galaxies not to exceed the predicted abundance of Dark Matter sub-halos yields a limit m_X >3 keV at 1-{\sigma} and m_X > 2.3 keV at 2-{\sigma} confidence level for the mass of thermal Warm Dark Matter particles. Such a limit is competitive with other limits set by the abundance of ultra-faint satellite galaxies in the Milky Way, is completely independent of baryon physics involved in galaxy formation, and has the potentiality for appreciable improvements with next observations. We extend our analysis to Dark Matter models based on sterile neutrinos, showing that our observations set tight constraints on the combination of sterile neutrino mass m_{\nu} and mixing parameter sin^2(2{\theta}). We discuss the robustness of our results with respect to systematics.
  • We present the multiwavelength photometry of two Frontier Fields massive galaxy clusters MACS-J0717 and MACS-J1149 and their parallel fields, ranging from HST to ground based K and Spitzer IRAC bands, and the public release of photometric redshifts and rest frame properties of galaxies found in cluster and parallel pointings. This work was done within ASTRODEEP project and aims to provide a reference for future investigations of the extragalactic populations. To fully exploit the depth of the images and detect faint sources we used an accurate procedure which carefully removes the foreground light of bright cluster sources and the intra-cluster light thus enabling detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. This same procedure has been successfully used to derive the photometric catalogue of MACS-J0416 and Abell-2744. The obtained multi-band photometry was used to derive photometric redshifts, magnification and physical properties of sources. In line with the first two FF catalogues released by ASTRODEEP, the photometric redshifts reach $\sim$4$\%$ accuracy. Moreover we extend the presently available samples to galaxies intrinsically as faint as H160$\sim$32-34 mag thanks the magnification factors induced to strong gravitational lensing. Our analysis allows us to probe galaxy masses larger then 10$^{7}$ M$\odot$ and/or SFR=0.1-1M$\odot$/yr out to redshift z$>6$.
  • We study the spectrophotometric properties of a highly magnified (\mu~40-70) pair of stellar systems identified at z=3.2222 behind the Hubble Frontier Field galaxy cluster MACS~J0416. Five multiple images (out of six) have been spectroscopically confirmed by means of VLT/MUSE and VLT/X-Shooter observations. Each image includes two faint (m_uv~30.6), young (<100 Myr), low-mass (<10^7 Msun), low-metallicity (12+Log(O/H)~7.7, or 1/10 solar) and compact (30 pc effective radius) stellar systems separated by ~300pc, after correcting for lensing amplification. We measured several rest-frame ultraviolet and optical narrow (\sigma_v <~ 25 km/s) high-ionization lines. These features may be the signature of very hot (T>50000 K) stars within dense stellar clusters, whose dynamical mass is likely dominated by the stellar component. Remarkably, the ultraviolet metal lines are not accompanied by Lya emission (e.g., CIV / Lya > 15), despite the fact that the Lya line flux is expected to be 150 times brighter (inferred from the Hbeta flux). A spatially-offset, strongly-magnified (\mu>50) Lya emission with a spatial extent <~7.6 kpc^2 is instead identified 2 kpc away from the system. The origin of such a faint emission can be the result of fluorescent Lya induced by a transverse leakage of ionizing radiation emerging from the stellar systems and/or can be associated to an underlying and barely detected object (with m_uv > 34 de-lensed). This is the first confirmed metal-line emitter at such low-luminosity and redshift without Lya emission, suggesting that, at least in some cases, a non-uniform covering factor of the neutral gas might hamper the Lya detection.
  • We present new ALMA observations of the [OIII]88$\mu$m line and high angular resolution observations of the [CII]158$\mu$m line in a normal star forming galaxy at z$=$7.1. Previous [CII] observations of this galaxy had detected [CII] emission consistent with the Ly$\alpha$ redshift but spatially slightly offset relative to the optical (UV-rest frame) emission. The new [CII] observations reveal that the [CII] emission is partly clumpy and partly diffuse on scales larger than about 1kpc. [OIII] emission is also detected at high significance, offset relative to the optical counterpart in the same direction as the [CII] clumps, but mostly not overlapping with the bulk of the [CII] emission. The offset between different emission components (optical/UV and different far-IR tracers) is similar to what observed in much more powerful starbursts at high redshift. We show that the [OIII] emitting clump cannot be explained in terms of diffuse gas excited by the UV radiation emitted by the optical galaxy, but it requires excitation by in-situ (slightly dust obscured) star formation, at a rate of about 7 M$_{\odot}$/yr. Within 20 kpc from the optical galaxy the ALMA data reveal two additional [OIII] emitting systems, which must be star forming companions. We discuss that the complex properties revealed by ALMA in the z$\sim$7.1 galaxy are consistent with expectations by recent models and cosmological simulations, in which differential dust extinction, differential excitation and different metal enrichment levels, associated with different subsystems assembling a galaxy, are responsible for the different appearance of the system when observed with different tracers.
  • The characteristics of low energy antiproton annihilations on nuclei (e.g. hadronization and product multiplicities) are not well known, and Monte Carlo simulation packages that use different models provide different descriptions of the annihilation events. In this study, we measured the particle multiplicities resulting from antiproton annihilations on nuclei. The results were compared with predictions obtained using different models in the simulation tools GEANT4 and FLUKA. For this study, we exposed thin targets (Cu, Ag and Au) to a very low energy antiproton beam from CERN's Antiproton Decelerator, exploiting the secondary beamline available in the AEgIS experimental zone. The antiproton annihilation products were detected using emulsion films developed at the Laboratory of High Energy Physics in Bern, where they were analysed at the automatic microscope facility. The fragment multiplicity measured in this study is in good agreement with results obtained with FLUKA simulations for both minimally and heavily ionizing particles.
  • We analyze a sample of $z$-dropout galaxies in the CANDELS GOODS South and UDS fields that have been targeted by a dedicated spectroscopic campaign aimed at detecting their Ly$\alpha$ line. Deep IRAC observations at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m are used to determine the strength of optical emission lines affecting these bands at z$\sim$6.5-6.9 in order to i) investigate possible physical differences between Ly$\alpha$ emitting and non-emitting sources; ii) constrain the escape fraction of ionizing photons; iii) provide an estimate of the specific star-formation rate at high redshifts. We find evidence of strong [OIII]+H$\beta$ emission in the average (stacked) SEDs of galaxies both with and without Ly$\alpha$ emission. The blue IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] color of the stack with detected Ly$\alpha$ line can be converted into a rest-frame equivalent width EW([OIII]+H$\beta$)=1500$^{+530}_{-440}\AA$ assuming a flat intrinsic stellar continuum. This strong optical line emission enables a first estimate of f$_{esc}\lesssim$20% on the escape fraction of ionizing photons from Ly$\alpha$ detected objects. The objects with no Ly$\alpha$ line show less extreme EW([OIII]+H$\beta$)=520$^{+170}_{-150}\AA$ suggesting different physical conditions of the HII regions with respect to Ly$\alpha$-emitting ones, or a larger f$_{esc}$. The latter case is consistent with a combined evolution of f$_{esc}$ and the neutral hydrogen fraction as an explanation of the lack of bright Ly$\alpha$ emission at z$>$6. A lower limit on the specific star formation rate, SSFR$>$9.1$Gyr^{-1}$ for $M_{star}=2 \times 10^9 M_{\odot}$ galaxies at these redshifts can be derived from the spectroscopically confirmed sample.
  • The reionization of the Universe is one of the most important topics of present day astrophysical research. The most plausible candidates for the reionization process are star-forming galaxies, which according to the predictions of the majority of the theoretical and semi-analytical models should dominate the HI ionizing background at z~3. We aim at measuring the Lyman continuum escape fraction, which is one of the key parameters to compute the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the UV background. We have used ultra-deep U-band imaging (U=30.2mag at 1sigma) by LBC/LBT in the CANDELS/GOODS-North field, as well as deep imaging in COSMOS and EGS fields, in order to estimate the Lyman continuum escape fraction of 69 star-forming galaxies with secure spectroscopic redshifts at 3.27<z<3.40 to faint magnitude limits (L=0.2L*, or equivalently M1500~-19). We have measured through stacks a stringent upper limit (<1.7% at 1sigma) for the relative escape fraction of HI ionizing photons from bright galaxies (L>L*), while for the faint population (L=0.2L*) the limit to the escape fraction is ~10%. We have computed the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the observed UV background at z~3 and we have found that it is not enough to keep the Universe ionized at these redshifts, unless their escape fraction increases significantly (>10%) at low luminosities (M1500>-19). We compare our results on the Lyman continuum escape fraction of high-z galaxies with recent estimates in the literature and discuss future prospects to shed light on the end of the Dark Ages. In the future, strong gravitational lensing will be fundamental to measure the Lyman continuum escape fraction down to faint magnitudes (M1500~-16) which are inaccessible with the present instrumentation on blank fields.
  • We report on five compact, extremely young (<10Myr) and blue (\beta_UV<-2.5, F_\lambda =\lambda^\beta) objects observed with VLT/MUSE at redshift 3.1169, 3.235, in addition to three objects at z=6.145. These sources are magnified by the Hubble Frontier Field galaxy clusters MACS~J0416 and AS1063. Their de-lensed half light radii (Re) are between 16 to 140pc, the stellar masses are ~1-20 X 10^6 Msun, the magnitudes are m_uv=28.8 - 31.4 (-17<Muv<-15) and specific star formation rates can be as large as ~800Gyr^-1. Multiple images of these systems are widely separated in the sky (up to 50'') and individually magnified by factors 3-40. Remarkably, the inferred physical properties of two objects are similar to those expected in some globular cluster formation scenarios, representing the best candidate proto-globular clusters (proto-GC) discovered so far. Rest-frame optical high dispersion spectroscopy of one of them at z=3.1169 yields a velocity dispersion \sigma_v~20km/s, implying a dynamical mass dominated by the stellar mass. Another object at z=6.145, with de-lensed Muv ~ -15.3 (m_uv ~ 31.4), shows a stellar mass and a star-formation rate surface density consistent with the values expected from popular GC formation scenarios. An additional star-forming region at z=6.145, with de-lensed m_uv ~ 32, a stellar mass of 0.5 X 10^6 Msun and a star formation rate of 0.06 Msun/yr is also identified. These objects currently represent the faintest spectroscopically confirmed star-forming systems at z>3, elusive even in the deepest blank fields. We discuss how proto-GCs might contribute to the ionization budget of the universe and augment Lya visibility during reionization. This work underlines the crucial role of JWST in characterizing the rest-frame optical and near-infrared properties of such low-luminosity high-z objects.
  • Determining the average fraction of Lyman continuum (LyC) photons escaping high redshift galaxies is essential for understanding how reionization proceeded in the z>6 Universe. We want to measure the LyC signal from a sample of sources in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) and COSMOS fields for which ultra-deep VIMOS spectroscopy as well as multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging are available. We select a sample of 46 galaxies at $z\sim 4$ from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) database, such that the VUDS spectra contain the LyC part of the spectra, that is, the rest-frame range $880-910\AA$. Taking advantage of the HST imaging, we apply a careful cleaning procedure and reject all the sources showing nearby clumps with different colours, that could potentially be lower-redshift interlopers. After this procedure, the sample is reduced to 33 galaxies. We measure the ratio between ionizing flux (LyC at $895\AA$) and non-ionizing emission (at $\sim 1500 \AA$) for all individual sources. We also produce a normalized stacked spectrum of all sources. Assuming an intrinsic average $L_{\nu}(1470)/L_{\nu}(895)$ of 3, we estimate the individual and average relative escape fraction. We do not detect ionizing radiation from any individual source, although we identify a possible LyC emitter with very high Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width (EW). From the stacked spectrum and assuming a mean transmissivity for the sample, we measure a relative escape fraction $f_{esc}^{rel}=0.09\pm0.04$. We also look for correlations between the limits in the LyC flux and source properties and find a tentative correlation between LyC flux and the EW of the Ly$\alpha$ emission line. Our results imply that the LyC flux emitted by $V=25-26$ star-forming galaxies at z$\sim$4 is at most very modest, in agreement with previous upper limits from studies based on broad and narrow band imaging.
  • Deep observations are revealing a growing number of young galaxies in the first billion year of cosmic time. Compared to typical galaxies at later times, they show more extreme emission-line properties, higher star formation rates, lower masses, and smaller sizes. However, their faintness precludes studies of their chemical abundances and ionization conditions, strongly limiting our understanding of the physics driving early galaxy build-up and metal enrichment. Here we study a rare population of UV-selected, sub$-L^{*}$(z=3) galaxies at redshift 2.4$<z<$3.5 that exhibit all the rest-frame properties expected from primeval galaxies. These low-mass, highly-compact systems are rapidly-forming galaxies able to double their stellar mass in only few tens million years. They are characterized by very blue UV spectra with weak absorption features and bright nebular emission lines, which imply hard radiation fields from young hot massive stars. Their highly-ionized gas phase has strongly sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances, with metallicities more than a factor of two lower than that found in typical galaxies of similar mass and star formation rate at $z\lesssim$2.5. These young galaxies reveal an early and short stage in the assembly of their galactic structures and their chemical evolution, a vigorous phase which is likely to be dominated by the effects of gas-rich mergers, accretion of metal-poor gas and strong outflows.
  • We present the discovery and spectrophotometric characterization of a large sample of 164 faint ($i_{AB}$ $\sim$ $23$-$25$ mag) star-forming dwarf galaxies (SFDGs) at redshift $0.13$ $\leq z \leq$ $0.88$ selected by the presence of bright optical emission lines in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS). We investigate their integrated physical properties and ionization conditions, which are used to discuss the low-mass end of the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) and other key scaling relations. We use optical VUDS spectra in the COSMOS, VVDS-02h, and ECDF-S fields, as well as deep multiwavelength photometry, to derive stellar masses, star formation rates (SFR) and gas-phase metallicities. The VUDS SFDGs are compact (median $r_{e}$ $\sim$ $1.2$ kpc), low-mass ($M_{*}$ $\sim$ $10^7-10^9$ $M_{\odot}$) galaxies with a wide range of star formation rates (SFR($H\alpha$) $\sim 10^{-3}-10^{1}$ $M_{\odot}/yr$) and morphologies. Overall, they show a broad range of subsolar metallicities (12+log(O/H)=$7.26$-$8.7$; $0.04$ $\lesssim Z/Z_{\odot} \lesssim$ $1$). The MZR of SFDGs shows a flatter slope compared to previous studies of galaxies in the same mass range and redshift. We find the scatter of the MZR partly explained in the low mass range by varying specific SFRs and gas fractions amongst the galaxies in our sample. Compared with simple chemical evolution models we find that most SFDGs do not follow the predictions of a "closed-box" model, but those from a gas regulating model in which gas flows are considered. While strong stellar feedback may produce large-scale outflows favoring the cessation of vigorous star formation and promoting the removal of metals, younger and more metal-poor dwarfs may have recently accreted large amounts of fresh, very metal-poor gas, that is used to fuel current star formation.
  • This paper introduces EGG, the Empirical Galaxy Generator, a tool designed within the ASTRODEEP collaboration to generate mock galaxy catalogs for deep fields with realistic fluxes and simple morphologies. The simulation procedure is based exclusively on empirical prescriptions -- rather than first principles -- to provide the most accurate match with observations at 0<z<7. In particular, we consider that galaxies can be either quiescent or star-forming, and use their stellar mass (M*) and redshift (z) as the fundamental properties from which all the other observables can be statistically derived. Drawing z and M* from the observed galaxy stellar mass functions, we associate a star formation rate (SFR) to each galaxy from the tight SFR-M* main sequence, while dust attenuation, optical colors and morphologies (including bulge-to-total ratios, sizes and aspect ratios) are obtained from empirical relations that we establish from the high quality Hubble and Herschel observations available in the CANDELS fields. Random scatter is introduced in each step to reproduce the observed distributions of each parameter. Based on these observables, a panchromatic spectral energy distribution (SED) is selected for each galaxy and synthetic photometry is produced by integrating the redshifted SED in common broad-band filters. Finally, the mock galaxies are placed on the sky at random positions with a fixed angular two-point correlation function to implement basic clustering. The resulting flux catalogs reproduce accurately the observed number counts in all broad bands from the ultraviolet up to the sub-millimeter, and can be directly fed to image simulators such as Skymaker. The images can then be used to test source extraction softwares and image-based techniques such as stacking. EGG is open-source, and is made available to the community together with a set of pre-generated catalogs and images.
  • We present a new exploration of the cosmic star-formation history and dust obscuration in massive galaxies at redshifts $0.5< z<6$. We utilize the deepest 450 and 850$\mu$m imaging from SCUBA-2 CLS, covering 230arcmin$^2$ in the AEGIS, COSMOS and UDS fields, together with 100-250$\mu$m imaging from Herschel. We demonstrate the capability of the T-PHOT deconfusion code to reach below the confusion limit, using multi-wavelength prior catalogues from CANDELS/3D-HST. By combining IR and UV data, we measure the relationship between total star-formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass up to $z\sim5$, indicating that UV-derived dust corrections underestimate the SFR in massive galaxies. We investigate the relationship between obscuration and the UV slope (the IRX-$\beta$ relation) in our sample, which is similar to that of low-redshift starburst galaxies, although it deviates at high stellar masses. Our data provide new measurements of the total SFR density (SFRD) in $M_\ast>10^{10}M_\odot$ galaxies at $0.5<z<6$. This is dominated by obscured star formation by a factor of $>10$. One third of this is accounted for by 450$\mu$m-detected sources, while one fifth is attributed to UV-luminous sources (brighter than $L^\ast_{UV}$), although even these are largely obscured. By extrapolating our results to include all stellar masses, we estimate a total SFRD that is in good agreement with previous results from IR and UV data at $z\lesssim3$, and from UV-only data at $z\sim5$. The cosmic star-formation history undergoes a transition at $z\sim3-4$, as predominantly unobscured growth in the early Universe is overtaken by obscured star formation, driven by the build-up of the most massive galaxies during the peak of cosmic assembly.
  • We present a multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the COSMOS field as part of the observations by the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). The catalog is based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) observations of the COSMOS field (centered at RA: $10^h00^m28^s$, Dec:$+02^{\circ}12^{\prime}21^{\prime\prime}$). The final catalog has 38671 sources with photometric data in forty two bands from UV to the infrared ($\rm \sim 0.3-8\,\mu m$). This includes broad-band photometry from the HST, CFHT, Subaru, VISTA and Spitzer Space Telescope in the visible, near infrared and infrared bands along with intermediate and narrow-band photometry from Subaru and medium band data from Mayall NEWFIRM. Source detection was conducted in the WFC3 F160W band (at $\rm 1.6\,\mu m$) and photometry is generated using the Template FITting algorithm. We further present a catalog of the physical properties of sources as identified in the HST F160W band and measured from the multi-band photometry by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions of sources against templates.
  • We present the serendipitous ALMA detection of a faint submillimeter galaxy (SMG) lensed by a foreground z~1 galaxy. By optimizing the source detection to deblend the system, we accurately build the full spectral energy distribution of the distant galaxy from the I814 band to radio wavelengths. It is extremely red, with a I-K colour larger than 2.5. We estimate a photometric redshift of 3.28 and determine the physical parameters. The distant galaxy turns out to be magnified by the foreground lens by a factor of ~1.5, which implies an intrinsic Ks-band magnitude of ~24.5, a submillimeter flux at 870um of ~2.5 mJy and a SFR of ~150-300Msun/yr, depending on the adopted tracer. These values place our source towards the faint end of the distribution of observed SMGs, and in particular among the still few faint SMGs with a fully characterized spectral energy distribution, which allows us not only to accurately estimate its redshift but also to measure its stellar mass and other physical properties. The galaxy studied in this work is a representative of the population of faint SMGs, of which only few objects are known to date, that are undetected in optical and therefore are not typically accounted for when measuring the cosmic star formation history (SFH). This faint galaxy population thus likely represents an important and missing piece in our understanding of the cosmic SFH. Its observation and characterization is of major importance to achieve a solid picture of galaxy evolution.
  • Galaxy interactions are thought to be one of the main triggers of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), especially at high luminosities, where the accreted gas mass during the AGN lifetime is substantial. Evidence for a connection between mergers and AGN, however, remains mixed. Possible triggering mechanisms remain particularly poorly understood for luminous AGN, which are thought to require triggering by major mergers, rather than secular processes. We analyse the host galaxies of a sample of 20 optically and X-ray selected luminous AGN (log($L_{bol}$ [erg/s]) $>$ 45) at z $\sim$ 0.6 using HST WFC3 data in the F160W/H band. 15/20 sources have resolved host galaxies. We create a control sample of mock AGN by matching the AGN host galaxies to a control sample of non-AGN galaxies. Visual signs of disturbances are found in about 25% of sources in both the AGN hosts and control galaxies. Using both visual classification and quantitative morphology measures, we show that the levels of disturbance are not enhanced when compared to a matched control sample. We find no signs that major mergers play a dominant role in triggering AGN at high luminosities, suggesting that minor mergers and secular processes dominate AGN triggering up to the highest AGN luminosities. The upper limit on the enhanced fraction of major mergers is $\leqslant$20%. While major mergers might increase the incidence of (luminous AGN), they are not the prevalent triggering mechanism in the population of unobscured AGN.
  • We present the new release v2.0 of T-PHOT, a publicly available software package developed to perform PSF-matched, prior-based, multiwavelength deconfusion photometry of extragalactic fields. New features included in the code are presented and discussed: background estimation, fitting using position dependent kernels, flux prioring, diagnostical statistics on the residual image, exclusion of selected sources from the model and residual images, individual registration of fitted objects. These new options improve on the performance of the code, allowing for more accurate results and providing useful aids for diagnostics.
  • We present new results on [CII]158$\mu$ m emission from four galaxies in the reionization epoch. These galaxies were previously confirmed to be at redshifts between 6.6 and 7.15 from the presence of the Ly$\alpha$ emission line in their spectra. The Ly$\alpha$ emission line is redshifted by 100-200 km/s compared to the systemic redshift given by the [CII] line. These velocity offsets are smaller than what is observed in z~3 Lyman break galaxies with similar UV luminosities and emission line properties. Smaller velocity shifts reduce the visibility of Ly$\alpha$ and hence somewhat alleviate the need for a very neutral IGM at z~7 to explain the drop in the fraction of Ly$\alpha$ emitters observed at this epoch. The galaxies show [CII] emission with L[CII]=0.6-1.6 x10$^8 L_\odot$: these luminosities place them consistently below the SFR-L[CII] relation observed for low redshift star forming and metal poor galaxies and also below z =5.5 Lyman break galaxies with similar star formation rates. We argue that previous undetections of [CII] in z~7 galaxies with similar or smaller star formation rates are due to selection effects: previous targets were mostly strong Ly$\alpha$ emitters and therefore probably metal poor systems, while our galaxies are more representative of the general high redshift star forming population .