• This white paper addresses selected new (to X-ray astronomy) physics and data analysis issues that will impact ASTRO-H SWG observations as a result of its high-spectral-resolution X-ray microcalorimeter, the focussing hard X-ray optics and corresponding detectors, and the low background soft gamma-ray detector. We concentrate on issues of atomic and nuclear physics, including basic bound-bound and bound-free transitions as well as scattering and radiative transfer. The major topic categories include the physics of charge exchange, solar system X-ray sources, advanced spectral model, radiative transfer, and hard X-ray emission lines and sources.
  • High-resolution X-ray spectra of O-type stars revealed less wind absorption than expected from smooth winds with conventional mass-loss rates. Various solutions have been proposed, including porous winds, optically thick clumps or an overall reduction of the mass-loss rates. The latter has a strong impact on the evolution of the star. Our final goal is to analyse high resolution X-ray spectra of O-type stars with a multi temperature plasma model in order to determine crucial wind parameters such as the mass loss rate, the CNO abundances and the X-ray temperature plasma distribution in the wind. In this context we are developing a modelling tool to calculate synthetic X-ray spectra. We present, here, the main ingredients and physics necessary for a such work. Our code uses the AtomDB emissivities to compute the intrinsic emissivity of the hot plasma as well as the CMFGEN model atmosphere code to evaluate the opacity of the cool wind. Following the comparison between two formalisms of stellar wind fragmentation, we introduce, for the first time in X-rays, the effects of a tenuous inter-clump medium. We then explore the quantitative impact of different model parameters on the X-ray spectra such as the position in the wind of the X-ray emitting plasma. For the first time, we show that the two formalisms of stellar wind fragmentation yield different results, although the differences for individual lines are small and can probably not be tested with the current generation of X-ray telescopes. As an illustration of our method, we compare various synthetic line profiles to the observed O VIII {\lambda} 18.97{\AA} line in the spectrum of {\zeta} Puppis. We illustrate how different combinations of parameters can actually lead to the same morphology of a single line, underlining the need to analyse the whole spectrum in a consistent way when attempting to constrain the parameters of the wind.
  • PROMPT (Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes) observed the early-time optical afterglow of GRB 060607A and obtained a densely sampled multiwavelength light curve that begins only tens of seconds after the GRB. Located at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, PROMPT is designed to observe the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts using multiple automated 0.4-m telescopes that image simultaneously in many filters when the afterglow is bright and may be highly variable. The data span the interval from 44 seconds after the GRB trigger to 3.3 hours in the Bgri filters. We observe an initial peak in the light curve at approximately three minutes, followed by rebrightenings peaking around 40 minutes and again at 66 minutes. Although our data overlap with the early Swift gamma-ray and x-ray light curves, we do not see a correlation between the optical and high-energy flares. We do not find evidence for spectral evolution throughout the observations. We model the variations in the light curves and find that the most likely cause of the rebrightening episodes is a refreshment of the forward shock preceded by a rapidly fading reverse shock component, although other explanations are plausible.
  • In 2000, Lamb and Reichart predicted that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows occur in sufficient numbers and at sufficient brightnesses at very high redshifts (z > 5) to eventually replace quasars as the preferred probe of element formation and reionization in the early universe and to be used to characterize the star-formation history of the early universe, perhaps back to when the first stars formed. Here we report the discovery of the afterglow of GRB 050904 and the identification of GRB 050904 as the first very high redshift GRB. We measure its redshift to be 6.39(+0.11,-0.12), which is consistent with the reported spectroscopic redshift (6.29 +/- 0.01). Furthermore, just redward of Ly-alpha the flux is suppressed by a factor of three on the first night, but returns to expected levels by the fourth night. We propose that this is due to absorption by molecular hydrogen that was excited to rovibrational states by the GRB's prompt emission, but was then overtaken by the jet. Now that very high redshift GRBs have been shown to exist, and at least in this case the afterglow was very bright, observing programs that are designed to capitalize on this science will likely drive a new era of study of the early universe, using GRBs as probes.