• The performance of optical clocks has strongly progressed in recent years, and accuracies and instabilities of 1 part in 10^18 are expected in the near future. The operation of optical clocks in space provides new scientific and technological opportunities. In particular, an earth-orbiting satellite containing an ensemble of optical clocks would allow a precision measurement of the gravitational redshift, navigation with improved precision, mapping of the earth's gravitational potential by relativistic geodesy, and comparisons between ground clocks.
  • We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally dipolar relaxation in a gas of magnetically trapped chromium atoms. We have found that the large magnetic moment of 6 $\mu_B$ results in an event rate coefficient for dipolar relaxation processes of up to $3.2\cdot10^{-11}$ cm$^{3}$s$^{-1}$ at a magnetic field of 44 G. We present a theoretical model based on pure dipolar coupling, which predicts dipolar relaxation rates in agreement with our experimental observations. This very general approach can be applied to a large variety of dipolar gases.
  • We have measured the deca-triplet s-wave scattering length of the bosonic chromium isotopes $^{52}$Cr and $^{50}$Cr. From the time constants for cross-dimensional thermalization in atomic samples we have determined the magnitudes $|a(^{52}Cr)|=(170 \pm 39)a_0$ and $|a(^{50}Cr)|=(40 \pm 15)a_0$, where $a_0=0.053nm$. By measuring the rethermalization rate of $^{52}$Cr over a wide temperature range and comparing the temperature dependence with the effective-range theory and single-channel calculations, we have obtained strong evidence that the sign of $a(^{52}Cr)$ is positive. Rescaling our $^{52}$Cr model potential to $^{50}$Cr strongly suggests that $a(^{50}Cr)$ is positive, too.