• Several studies have shown that stellar activity features, such as occulted and non-occulted starspots, can affect the measurement of transit parameters biasing studies of transit timing variations and transmission spectra. We present $\texttt{PyTranSpot}$, which we designed to model multiband transit light curves showing starspot anomalies, inferring both transit and spot parameters. The code follows a pixellation approach to model the star with its corresponding limb darkening, spots, and transiting planet on a two dimensional Cartesian coordinate grid. We combine $\texttt{PyTranSpot}$ with an MCMC framework to study and derive exoplanet transmission spectra, which provides statistically robust values for the physical properties and uncertainties of a transiting star-planet system. We validate $\texttt{PyTranSpot}$'s performance by analyzing eleven synthetic light curves of four different star-planet systems and 20 transit light curves of the well-studied WASP-41b system. We also investigate the impact of starspots on transit parameters and derive wavelength dependent transit depth values for WASP-41b covering a range of 6200-9200 $\AA$, indicating a flat transmission spectrum.
  • The ANTARES radiation hydrodynamics code is capable of simulating the solar granulation in detail unequaled by direct observation. We introduce a state-of-the-art numerical tool to the solar physics community and demonstrate its applicability to model the solar granulation. The code is based on the weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite volume method and by its implementation of local mesh refinement is also capable of simulating turbulent fluids. While the ANTARES code already provides promising insights into small-scale dynamical processes occurring in the quiet-Sun photosphere, it will soon be capable of modeling the latter in the scope of radiation magnetohydrodynamics. In this first preliminary study we focus on the vertical photospheric stratification by examining a 3-D model photosphere with an evolution time much larger than the dynamical timescales of the solar granulation and of particular large horizontal extent corresponding to $25\!" \!\! \times \, 25\!"$ on the solar surface to smooth out horizontal spatial inhomogeneities separately for up- and downflows. The highly resolved Cartesian grid thereby covers $\sim 4~\mathrm{Mm}$ of the upper convection zone and the adjacent photosphere. Correlation analysis, both local and two-point, provides a suitable means to probe the photospheric structure and thereby to identify several layers of characteristic dynamics: The thermal convection zone is found to reach some ten kilometers above the solar surface, while convectively overshooting gas penetrates even higher into the low photosphere. An $\approx 145\,\mathrm{km}$ wide transition layer separates the convective from the oscillatory layers in the higher photosphere.
  • We study the C8.4 class solar flare SOL2016-05-14T11:34 UT using high-resolution spectral imaging in the Ca ii 8542 {\AA} line obtained with the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter on the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. Spectroscopic inversions of the Ca ii 8542 {\AA} line using the non-LTE code NICOLE are used to investigate the evolution of the temperature and velocity structure in the flare chromosphere. A comparison of the temperature stratification in flaring and non-flaring areas reveals strong footpoint heating during the flare peak in the lower atmosphere. The temperature of the flaring footpoints between continuum optical depth at 500~nm, $\mathrm{log~\tau_{500}~\approx -2.5~and~ -3.5}$ is $\mathrm{\sim5-6.5~kK}$, close to the flare peak, reducing gradually to $\mathrm{\sim5~kK}$. The temperature in the middle and upper chromosphere, between $\mathrm{log~\tau_{500} \approx - 3.5~and~- 5.5}$, is estimated to be $\mathrm{\sim6.5 - 20~kK}$, decreasing to pre-flare temperatures, $\mathrm{\sim5 - 10~kK}$, after approximately 15 minutes. However, the temperature stratification of the non-flaring areas is unchanged. The inverted velocity fields show that the flaring chromosphere is dominated by weak downflowing condensations at the Ca ii 8542 {\AA} formation height.
  • Stellar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may play an important role in mass- and angular momentum loss of young Sun-like stars. If occurring frequently, they may also have a strong effect on planetary evolution by increasing atmospheric erosion. So far it has not been possible to infer the occurrence frequency of stellar CMEs from observations. Based on their close relation with flares on the Sun, we develop an empirical model combining solar flare-CME relationships with stellar flare rates to estimate the CME activity of young Sun-like and late-type main-sequence stars. By comparison of the obtained CME mass-loss rates with observations of total mass-loss rates, we find that our modeled rates may exceed those from observations by orders of magnitude for the most active stars. This reveals a possible limit to the extrapolation of such models to the youngest stars. We find that the most uncertain component in the model is the flare-CME association rate adopted from the Sun, which does not properly account for the likely stronger coronal confinement in active stars. Simple estimates of this effect reveal a possible suppression of CME rates by several orders of magnitude for young stars, indicating that this issue should be addressed in more detail in the future.
  • The main aim of this work is to determine the solar differential rotation by tracing sunspot groups during the period 1964-2016, using the Kanzelh\"ohe Observatory for Solar and Environmental Research (KSO) sunspot drawings and white light images. Two procedures for the determination of the heliographic positions were applied: an interactive procedure on the KSO sunspot drawings (1964 - 2008, solar cycles nos. 20 - 23) and an automatic procedure on the KSO white light images (2009 - 2016, solar cycle no. 24). For the determination of the synodic angular rotation velocities two different methods have been used: a daily shift (DS) method and a robust linear least-squares fit (rLSQ) method. Afterwards, the rotation velocities had to be converted from synodic to sidereal, which were then used in the least-squares fitting for the solar differential rotation law. For the test data from 2014, we found the rLSQ method for calculating rotational velocities to be more reliable than the DS method. The best fit solar differential rotation profile for the whole time period is $\omega(b)$ = (14.47 $\pm$ 0.01) - (2.66 $\pm$ 0.10) $\sin^2b$ (deg/day) for the DS method and $\omega(b)$ = (14.50 $\pm$ 0.01) - (2.87 $\pm$ 0.12) $\sin^2b$ (deg/day) for the rLSQ method. A barely noticeable north - south asymmetry is observed for the whole time period 1964 - 2016 in the present paper. Rotation profiles, using different data sets (e.g. Debrecen Photoheliographic Data, Greenwich Photoheliographic Results), presented by other authors for the same time periods and the same tracer types, are in good agreement with our results. Therefore, the KSO data set is suitable for the investigation of the long-term variabilities in the solar rotation profile.
  • Recent SECCHI COR2 observations on board STEREO-A spacecraft have detected density structures at a distance of 2.5--15~R propagating with periodicity of about 90~minutes. The observations show that the density structures probably formed in the lower corona. We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts in the frequency range of 8--32~MHz during the time interval of 08:15--11:00~UT on August 1, 2011. Radio emission in this frequency range originated at the distance of 1.5--2.5 R according to the Baumbach-Allen density model of the solar corona. Morlet wavelet analysis showed the periodicity of 80~min in radio emission intensity at all frequencies, which demonstrates that there are quasi-periodic variations of coronal density at all heights. The observed periodicity corresponds to the acoustic cut-off frequency of stratified corona at a temperature of 1~MK. We suggest that continuous perturbations of the coronal base in the form of jets/explosive events generate acoustic pulses, which propagate upwards and leave the wake behind oscillating at the coronal cut-off frequency. This wake may transform into recurrent shocks due to the density decrease with height, which leads to the observed periodicity in the radio emission. The recurrent shocks may trigger quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in helmet streamers, where the opposite field lines merge and consequently may generate periodic density structures observed in the solar wind.
  • We present eight monitoring seasons of the four brightest images of the gravitational lens SDSS J1004+4112 observed between December 2003 and October 2010. Using measured time delays for the images A, B and C and the model predicted time delay for image D we have removed the intrinsic quasar variability, finding microlensing events of about 0.5 and 0.7 mag of amplitude in the images C and D. From the statistics of microlensing amplitudes in images A, C, and D, we have inferred the half-light radius (at {\lambda} rest = 2407 {\AA}) for the accretion disk using two different methods, $R_{1/2}=8.7^{+18.5}_{-5.5} \sqrt{M/0.3 M_\odot}$ (histograms product) and $R_{1/2} = 4.2^{+3.2}_{-2.2} \sqrt{M/0.3 M_\odot}$ light-days ($\chi^2$). The results are in agreement within uncertainties with the size predicted from the black hole mass in SDSS J1004+4112 using the thin disk theory.
  • Using data obtained by the high resolution CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter instrument on the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope, we investigate the dynamics and stability of quiet-Sun chromospheric jets observed at disk center. Small-scale features, such as Rapid Redshifted and Blueshifted Excursions, appearing as high speed jets in the wings of the H$\alpha$ line, are characterized by short lifetimes and rapid fading without any descending behavior. To study the theoretical aspects of their stability without considering their formation mechanism, we model chromospheric jets as twisted magnetic flux tubes moving along their axis, and use the ideal linear incompressible magnetohydrodynamic approximation to derive the governing dispersion equation. Analytical solutions of the dispersion equation indicate that this type of jet is unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), with a very short (few seconds) instability growth time at high upflow speeds. The generated vortices and unresolved turbulent flows associated with the KHI could be observed as broadening of chromospheric spectral lines. Analysis of the H$\alpha$ line profiles shows that the detected structures have enhanced line widths with respect to the background. We also investigate the stability of a larger scale H$\alpha$ jet that was ejected along the line-of-sight. Vortex-like features, rapidly developing around the jet's boundary, are considered as evidence of the KHI. The analysis of the energy equation in the partially ionized plasma shows that the ion-neutral collisions may lead to the fast heating of the KH vortices over timescales comparable to the lifetime of chromospheric jets.
  • We present the analysis of six nights of spectroscopic monitoring of two young and fast rotating late-type stars, namely the dMe star HK Aqr and the dG/dK star PZ Tel. On both stars we detect absorption features reminiscent of signatures of co-rotating cool clouds or prominences visible in H$\alpha$. Several prominences on HK Aqr show periodic variability in the prominence tracks which follow a sinusoidal motion (indication of prominence oscillations). On PZ Tel we could not find any periodic variability in the prominence tracks. By fitting sinusoidal functions to the prominence tracks we derive amplitudes and periods which are similar to those of large amplitude oscillations seen in solar prominences. In one specific event we also derive a periodic variation of the prominence track in the H$\beta$ spectral line which shows an anti-phase variation with the one derived for the H$\alpha$ spectral line. Using these parameters and estimated mass density of a prominence on HK Aqr we derive a minimum magnetic field strength of $\sim$2G. The relatively low strength of the magnetic field is explained by the large height of this stellar prominence ($\ge$ 0.67 stellar radii above the surface).
  • Context. The Sun shows an activity cycle that is caused by its varying global magnetic field. During a solar cycle, sunspots, i.e. extended regions of strong magnetic fields, occur in activity belts that are slowly migrating from middle to lower latitudes, finally arriving close to the equator during the cycle maximum phase. While this have been well known for centuries, much less is known about the solar cycle evolution of small-scale magnetic fields. Aims. To address this question, we study magnetic bright points (MBPs) as proxies for such small-scale, kG solar magnetic fields. This study is based on a homogeneous data set that covers a period of eight years. Methods. An automated MBP identification algorithm was applied to the synoptic Hinode/SOT G-band data over the period November 2006 to August 2014, i.e. covering the decreasing phase of Cycle 23 and the rise, maximum, and early decrease of Cycle 24. This data set includes, at the moment of investigation, a total of 4 162 images, with about 2.9 million single MBP detections. Results. After a careful preselection and monthly median filtering of the data, the investigation revealed that the number of MBPs close to the equator is coupled to the global solar cycle but shifted in time by about 2.5 years. Furthermore, the instantaneous number of detected MBPs depends on the hemisphere, with one hemisphere being more prominent, i.e. showing a higher number of MBPs. After the end of Cycle 23 and at the starting point of Cycle 24, the more active hemisphere changed from south to north. Conclusions. These findings suggest that there is indeed a coupling between the activity of MBPs close to the equator with the global magnetic field. The results also indicate that a significant fraction of the magnetic flux that is visible as MBPs close to the equator originates from the sunspot activity belts.
  • We study the origin and escape of catastrophically outgassed volatiles (H$_2$O, CO$_2$) from exomoons with Earth-like densities and masses of $0.1M_{\oplus}$, $0.5M_{\oplus}$ and $1M_{\oplus}$ orbiting an extra-solar gas giant inside the habitable zone of a young active solar-like star. We apply a radiation absorption and hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model to the three studied exomoon cases. We model the escape of hydrogen and dragged dissociation products O and C during the activity saturation phase of the young host star. Because the soft X-ray and EUV radiation of the young host star may be up to $\sim$100 times higher compared to today's solar value during the first 100 Myr after the system's origin, an exomoon with a mass $ < 0.25M_{\oplus}$ located in the HZ may not be able to keep an atmosphere because of its low gravity. Depending on the spectral type and XUV activity evolution of the host star, exomoons with masses between $\sim0.25-0.5M_{\oplus}$ may evolve to Mars-like habitats. More massive bodies with masses $ > 0.5M_{\oplus}$, however, may evolve to habitats that are a mixture of Mars-like and Earth-analogue habitats, so that life may originate and evolve at the exomoon's surface.
  • Long-term records of sunspot number and concentrations of cosmogenic radionuclides (10Be and 14C) on the Earth reveal the variation of the Sun's magnetic activity over hundreds and thousands of years. We identify several clear periods in sunspot, 10Be, and 14C data as 1000, 500, 350, 200 and 100 years. We found that the periods of the first five spherical harmonics of the slow magnetic Rossby mode in the presence of a steady toroidal magnetic field of 1200-1300 G in the lower tachocline are in perfect agreement with the time scales of observed variations. The steady toroidal magnetic field can be generated in the lower tachocline either due to the steady dynamo magnetic field for low magnetic diffusivity or due to the action of the latitudinal differential rotation on the weak poloidal primordial magnetic field, which penetrates from the radiative interior. The slow magnetic Rossby waves lead to variations of the steady toroidal magnetic field in the lower tachocline, which modulate the dynamo magnetic field and consequently the solar cycle strength. This result constitutes a key point for long-term prediction of the cycle strength. According to our model, the next deep minimum in solar activity is expected during the first half of this century.
  • Recent results from high-resolution solar granulation observations indicate the existence of a population of small granular cells that are smaller than 600 km in diameter. These small convective cells strongly contribute to the total area of granules and are located in the intergranular lanes, where they form clusters and chains. We study high-resolution radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the upper convection zone and photosphere to detect small granular cells, define their spatial alignment, and analyze their physical properties. We developed an automated image-segmentation algorithm specifically adapted to high-resolution simulations to identify granules. The resulting segmentation masks were applied to physical quantities, such as intensity and vertical velocity profiles, provided by the simulation. A new clustering algorithm was developed to study the alignment of small granular cells. This study shows that small granules make a distinct contribution to the total area of granules and form clusters of chain-like alignments. The simulation profiles demonstrate a different nature for small granular cells because they exhibit on average lower intensities, lower horizontal velocities, and are located deeper inside of convective layers than regular granules. Their intensity distribution deviates from a normal distribution as known for larger granules, and follows a Weibull distribution.
  • The Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network (SSALMON) was initiated in 2014 in connection with two ALMA development studies. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a powerful new tool, which can also observe the Sun at high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. The international SSALMONetwork aims at coordinating the further development of solar observing modes for ALMA and at promoting scientific opportunities for solar physics with particular focus on numerical simulations, which can provide important constraints for the observing modes and can aid the interpretation of future observations. The radiation detected by ALMA originates mostly in the solar chromosphere - a complex and dynamic layer between the photosphere and corona, which plays an important role in the transport of energy and matter and the heating of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. Potential targets include active regions, prominences, quiet Sun regions, flares. Here, we give a brief overview over the network and potential science cases for future solar observations with ALMA.
  • R.P.J. Tilanus, T.P. Krichbaum, J.A. Zensus, A. Baudry, M. Bremer, H. Falcke, G. Giovannini, R. Laing, H. J. van Langevelde, W. Vlemmings, Z. Abraham, J. Afonso, I. Agudo, A. Alberdi, J. Alcolea, D. Altamirano, S. Asadi, K. Assaf, P. Augusto, A-K. Baczko, M. Boeck, T. Boller, M. Bondi, F. Boone, G. Bourda, R. Brajsa, J. Brand, S. Britzen, V. Bujarrabal, S. Cales, C. Casadio, V. Casasola, P. Castangia, J. Cernicharo, P. Charlot, L. Chemin, Y. Clenet, F. Colomer, F. Combes, J. Cordes, M. Coriat, N. Cross, F. D'Ammando, D. Dallacasa, J-F. Desmurs, R. Eatough, A. Eckart, D. Eisenacher, S. Etoka, M. Felix, R. Fender, M. Ferreira, E. Freeland, S. Frey, C. Fromm, L. Fuhrmann, K. Gabanyi, R. Galvan-Madrid, M. Giroletti, C. Goddi, J. Gomez, E. Gourgoulhon, M. Gray, I. di Gregorio, R. Greimel, N. Grosso, J. Guirado, K. Hada, A. Hanslmeier, C. Henkel, F. Herpin, P. Hess, J. Hodgson, D. Horns, E. Humphreys, B. Hutawarakorn Kramer, V. Ilyushin, V. Impellizzeri, V. Ivanov, M. Julião, M. Kadler, E. Kerins, P. Klaassen, K. van 't Klooster, E. Kording, M. Kozlov, M. Kramer, A. Kreikenbohm, O. Kurtanidze, J. Lazio, A. Leite, M. Leitzinger, J. Lepine, S. Levshakov, R. Lico, M. Lindqvist, E. Liuzzo, A. Lobanov, P. Lucas, K. Mannheim, J. Marcaide, S. Markoff, I. Martí-Vidal, C. Martins, N. Masetti, M. Massardi, K. Menten, H. Messias, S. Migliari, A. Mignano, J. Miller-Jones, D. Minniti, P. Molaro, S. Molina, A. Monteiro, L. Moscadelli, C. Mueller, A. Müller, S. Muller, F. Niederhofer, P. Odert, H. Olofsson, M. Orienti, R. Paladino, F. Panessa, Z. Paragi, T. Paumard, P. Pedrosa, M. Pérez-Torres, G. Perrin, M. Perucho, D. Porquet, I. Prandoni, S. Ransom, D. Reimers, M. Rejkuba, L. Rezzolla, A. Richards, E. Ros, A. Roy, A. Rushton, T. Savolainen, R. Schulz, M. Silva, G. Sivakoff, R. Soria-Ruiz, R. Soria, M. Spaans, R. Spencer, B. Stappers, G. Surcis, A. Tarchi, M. Temmer, M. Thompson, J. Torrelles, J. Truestedt, V. Tudose, T. Venturi, J. Verbiest, J. Vieira, P. Vielzeuf, F. Vincent, N. Wex, K. Wiik, T. Wiklind, J. Wilms, E. Zackrisson, H. Zechlin
    July 1, 2014 astro-ph.IM
    Very long baseline interferometry at millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths (mmVLBI) offers the highest achievable spatial resolution at any wavelength in astronomy. The anticipated inclusion of ALMA as a phased array into a global VLBI network will bring unprecedented sensitivity and a transformational leap in capabilities for mmVLBI. Building on years of pioneering efforts in the US and Europe the ongoing ALMA Phasing Project (APP), a US-led international collaboration with MPIfR-led European contributions, is expected to deliver a beamformer and VLBI capability to ALMA by the end of 2014 (APP: Fish et al. 2013, arXiv:1309.3519). This report focuses on the future use of mmVLBI by the international users community from a European viewpoint. Firstly, it highlights the intense science interest in Europe in future mmVLBI observations as compiled from the responses to a general call to the European community for future research projects. A wide range of research is presented that includes, amongst others: - Imaging the event horizon of the black hole at the centre of the Galaxy - Testing the theory of General Relativity an/or searching for alternative theories - Studying the origin of AGN jets and jet formation - Cosmological evolution of galaxies and BHs, AGN feedback - Masers in the Milky Way (in stars and star-forming regions) - Extragalactic emission lines and astro-chemistry - Redshifted absorption lines in distant galaxies and study of the ISM and circumnuclear gas - Pulsars, neutron stars, X-ray binaries - Testing cosmology - Testing fundamental physical constants
  • We present a search for stellar activity (flares and mass ejections) in a sample of 28 stars in the young open cluster Blanco-1. We use optical spectra obtained with ESO's VIMOS multi-object spectrograph installed on the VLT. From the total observing time of $\sim$ 5 hours, we find four H$\alpha$ flares but no distinct indication of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the investigated dK-dM stars. Two flares show "dips" in their light-curves right before their impulsive phases which are similar to previous discoveries in photometric light-curves of active dMe stars. We estimate an upper limit of $<$4 CMEs per day per star and discuss this result with respect to a semi- empirical estimation of the CME rate of main-sequence stars. We find that we should have detected at least one CME per star with a mass of 1-15$\times10^{16}$ g depending on the star's X-ray luminosity, but the estimated H$\alpha$ fluxes associated with these masses are below the detection limit of our observations. We conclude that the parameter which mainly influences the detection of stellar CMEs using the method of Doppler-shifted emission caused by moving plasma is not the spectral resolution or velocity but the flux or mass of the CME.
  • Context. The variations of solar activity over long time intervals using a solar activity reconstruction based on the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be measured in polar ice cores are studied. Methods. By applying methods of nonlinear dynamics, the solar activity cycle is studied using solar activity proxies that have been reaching into the past for over 9300 years. The complexity of the system is expressed by several parameters of nonlinear dynamics, such as embedding dimension or false nearest neighbors, and the method of delay coordinates is applied to the time series. We also fit a damped random walk model, which accurately describes the variability of quasars, to the solar 10Be data and investigate the corresponding power spectral distribution. The periods in the data series were searched by the Fourier and wavelet analyses. The solar activity on the long-term scale is found to be on the edge of chaotic behavior. This can explain the observed intermittent period of longer lasting solar activity minima. Filtering the data by eliminating variations below a certain period (the periods of 380 yr and 57 yr were used) yields a far more regular behavior of solar activity. A comparison between the results for the 10Be data with the 14C data shows many similarities. Both cosmogenic isotopes are strongly correlated mutually and with solar activity. Finally, we find that a series of damped random walk models provides a good fit to the 10Be data with a fixed characteristic time scale of 1000 years, which is roughly consistent with the quasi-periods found by the Fourier and wavelet analyses.
  • The recently discovered low-density "super-Earths" Kepler-11b, Kepler-11f, Kepler-11d, Kepler-11e, and planets such as GJ 1214b represent most likely planets which are surrounded by dense H/He envelopes or contain deep H2O oceans also surrounded by dense hydrogen envelopes. Although these "super-Earths" are orbiting relatively close to their host stars, they have not lost their captured nebula-based hydrogen-rich or degassed volatile-rich steam protoatmospheres. Thus it is interesting to estimate the maximum possible amount of atmospheric hydrogen loss from a terrestrial planet orbiting within the habitable zone of late main sequence host stars. For studying the thermosphere structure and escape we apply a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model which solves the equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for a planet with the mass and size of the Earth and for a "super-Earth" with a size of 2 R_Earth and a mass of 10 M_Earth. We calculate volume heating rates by the stellar soft X-ray and EUV radiation and expansion of the upper atmosphere, its temperature, density and velocity structure and related thermal escape rates during planet's life time. Moreover, we investigate under which conditions both planets enter the blow-off escape regime and may therefore experience loss rates which are close to the energy-limited escape. Finally we discuss the results in the context of atmospheric evolution and implications for habitability of terrestrial planets in general.
  • We study the interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star, such as GJ 436, and hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of an Earth-like planet and a "super-Earth" with the radius of 2 R_Earth and a mass of 10 M_Earth, located within the habitable zone at ~0.24 AU. We investigate the formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influences of the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause), and the loss of planetary pick-up ions on the evolution of hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres. Stellar XUV fluxes which are 1, 10, 50 and 100 times higher compared to that of the present-day Sun are considered and the formation of high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to the charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions have been modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with planetary hydrogen atoms, and photoionization, leads to the production of initially cold ions of planetary origin. We found that the ion production rates for the studied planets can vary over a wide range, from ~1.0x10^{25} s^{-1} to ~5.3x10^{30} s^{-1}, depending on the stellar wind conditions and the assumed XUV exposure of the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that most likely the majority of these planetary ions are picked up by the stellar wind and lost from the planet. Finally, we estimate the long-time non-thermal ion pick-up escape for the studied planets and compare them with the thermal escape. According to our estimates, non-thermal escape of picked up ionized hydrogen atoms over a planet's lifetime varies between ~0.4 Earth ocean equivalent amounts of hydrogen (EO_H) to <3 EO_H and usually is several times smaller in comparison to the thermal atmospheric escape rates.
  • Small scale magnetic fields can be observed on the Sun in G-band filtergrams as MBPs (magnetic bright points) or identified in spectro-polarimetric measurements due to enhanced signals of Stokes profiles. These magnetic fields and their dynamics play a crucial role in understanding the coronal heating problem and also in surface dynamo models. MBPs can theoretically be described to evolve out of a patch of a solar photospheric magnetic field with values below the equipartition field strength by the so-called convective collapse model. After the collapse, the magnetic field of MBPs reaches a higher stable magnetic field level. The magnetic field strength distribution of small scale magnetic fields as seen by MBPs is inferred. Furthermore, we want to test the model of convective collapse and the theoretically predicted stable value of about 1300 G. We used four different data sets of high-resolution Hinode/SOT observations that were recorded simultaneously with the broadband filter device (G-band, Ca II-H) and the spectro-polarimeter. To derive the magnetic field strength distribution of these small scale features, the spectropolarimeter (SP) data sets were treated by the Merlin inversion code. The four data sets comprise different solar surface types: active regions (a sunspot group and a region with pores), as well as quiet Sun. In all four cases the obtained magnetic field strength distribution of MBPs is similar and shows peaks around 1300 G. This agrees well with the theoretical prediction of the convective collapse model. The resulting magnetic field strength distribution can be fitted in each case by a model consisting of log-normal components. The important parameters, such as geometrical mean value and multiplicative standard deviation, are similar in all data sets, only the relative weighting of the components is different.
  • We used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the \textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory} (SDO) to study coronal loops at small scales, emerging in the quiet Sun. With HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, we derive the integrated and unsigned photospheric magnetic flux at the loop footpoints in the photosphere. These loops are bright in the EUV channels of AIA. Using the six AIA EUV filters, we construct the differential emission measure (DEM) in the temperature range $5.7 - 6.5$ in log $T$ (K) for several hours of observations. The observed DEMs have a peak distribution around log $T \approx$ 6.3, falling rapidly at higher temperatures. For log $T <$ 6.3, DEMs are comparable to their peak values within an order of magnitude. The emission weighted temperature is calculated, and its time variations are compared with those of magnetic flux. We present two possibilities for explaining the observed DEMs and temperatures variations. (a) Assuming the observed loops are comprised of hundred thin strands with certain radius and length, we tested three time-dependent heating models and compared the resulting DEMs and temperatures with the observed quantities. This modeling used Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL), a zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic code. The comparisons suggest that a medium frequency heating model with a population of different heating amplitudes can roughly reproduce the observations. (b) We also consider a loop model with steady heating and non-uniform cross-section of the loop along its length, and find that this model can also reproduce the observed DEMs, provided the loop expansion factor $\gamma \sim$ 5 - 10. More observational constraints are required to better understand the nature of coronal heating in the short emerging loops on the quiet Sun.
  • Small-scale magnetic fields can be observed on the Sun in high resolution G-band filtergrams as magnetic bright points (MBPs). We study Hinode/ Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) longitude and latitude scans of the quiet solar surface taken in the G-band in order to characterise the centre-to-limb dependence of MBP properties (size and intensity). We find that the MBP's sizes increase and their intensities decrease from the solar centre towards the limb. The size distribution can be fitted using a log-normal function. The natural logartihm of the mean (parameter \mu) of this function follows a second-order polynomial and the generalised standard deviation (parameter \sigma) follows a fourth-order polynomial or equally well (within statistical errors) a sine function. The brightness decrease of the features is smaller than one would expect from the normal solar centre-to-limb variation; that is to say, the ratio of a MBP's brightness to the mean intensity of the image increases towards the limb. The centre-to-limb variations of the intensities of the MBPs and the quiet-Sun field can be fitted by a second order polynomial. The detailed physical process that results in an increase of a MBP's brightness and size from Sun centre to the limb is not yet understood and has to be studied in more detail in the future.
  • We present a new observational campaign, DWARF, aimed at detection of circumbinary extrasolar planets using the timing of the minima of low-mass eclipsing binaries. The observations will be performed within an extensive network of relatively small to medium-size telescopes with apertures of ~20-200 cm. The starting sample of the objects to be monitored contains (i) low-mass eclipsing binaries with M and K components, (ii) short-period binaries with sdB or sdO component, and (iii) post-common-envelope systems containing a WD, which enable to determine minima with high precision. Since the amplitude of the timing signal increases with the orbital period of an invisible third component, the timescale of project is long, at least 5-10 years. The paper gives simple formulas to estimate suitability of individual eclipsing binaries for the circumbinary planet detection. Intrinsic variability of the binaries (photospheric spots, flares, pulsation etc.) limiting the accuracy of the minima timing is also discussed. The manuscript also describes the best observing strategy and methods to detect cyclic timing variability in the minima times indicating presence of circumbinary planets. First test observation of the selected targets are presented.
  • A 50 min time series of one-dimensional slit-spectrograms, taken in quiet sun at disk center, observed at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide), was used to study the global and spatial variations of different line parameters. In order to determine the vertical structure of the photosphere two lines with well separated formation heights have been considered. The data have been filtered of p-modes to isolate the pure convective phenomenon. From our studies of global correlation coefficients and coherence and phase shift analyzes between the several line parameters, the following results can be reported. The convective velocity pattern preserves structures larger than 1.0" up to the highest layers of the photosphere (~ 435 km). However, at these layers, in the intensity pattern only structures larger than 2.0" are still connected with those at the continuum level although showing inverted brightness contrast. This confirms an inversion of temperature that we have found at a height of ~140 km. A possible evidence of gravity waves superimposed to the convective motions is derived from the phase shift analysis. We interpret the behavior of the full width at half maximum and the equivalent width as a function of the distance to the granular borders, as a consequence of enhanced turbulence and/or strong velocity gradients in the intergranular lanes.
  • From the inversion of a time series of high resolution slit spectrograms obtained from the quiet sun, the spatial and temporal distribution of the thermodynamical quantities and the vertical flow velocity is derived as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Spatial coherence and phase shift analyzes between temperature and vertical velocity depict the height variation of these physical quantities for structures of different size. An average granular cell model is presented, showing the granule-intergranular lane stratification of temperature, vertical velocity, gas pressure and density as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Studies of a specific small and a specific large granular cell complement these results. A strong decay of the temperature fluctuations with increasing height together with a less efficient penetration of smaller cells is revealed. The T -T coherence at all granular scales is broken already at log tau =-1 or z~170 km. At the layers beyond, an inversion of the temperature contrast is revealed. Vertical velocities are in phase throughout the photosphere and penetrate into the highest layers under study.