• We extend a recently developed galaxy morphology classification method, Quantitative Multiwavelength Morphology (QMM), to connect galaxy morphologies to their underlying physical properties. The traditional classification of galaxies approaches the problem separately through either morphological classification or, in more recent times, through analysis of physical properties. A combined approach has significant potential in producing a consistent and accurate classification scheme as well as shedding light on the origin and evolution of galaxy morphology. Here we present an analysis of a volume limited sample of 31703 galaxies from the fourth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use an image analysis method called Pixel-z to extract the underlying physical properties of the galaxies, which is then quantified using the concentration, asymmetry and clumpiness (CAS) parameters. The galaxies also have their multiwavelength morphologies quantified using QMM, and these results are then related to the distributed physical properties through a regression analysis. We show that this method can be used to relate the spatial distribution of physical properties with the morphological properties of galaxies.
  • LSST Science Collaborations: Paul A. Abell, Julius Allison, Scott F. Anderson, John R. Andrew, J. Roger P. Angel, Lee Armus, David Arnett, S. J. Asztalos, Tim S. Axelrod, Stephen Bailey, D. R. Ballantyne, Justin R. Bankert, Wayne A. Barkhouse, Jeffrey D. Barr, L. Felipe Barrientos, Aaron J. Barth, James G. Bartlett, Andrew C. Becker, Jacek Becla, Timothy C. Beers, Joseph P. Bernstein, Rahul Biswas, Michael R. Blanton, Joshua S. Bloom, John J. Bochanski, Pat Boeshaar, Kirk D. Borne, Marusa Bradac, W. N. Brandt, Carrie R. Bridge, Michael E. Brown, Robert J. Brunner, James S. Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, James H. Burge, David L. Burke, Phillip A. Cargile, Srinivasan Chandrasekharan, George Chartas, Steven R. Chesley, You-Hua Chu, David Cinabro, Mark W. Claire, Charles F. Claver, Douglas Clowe, A. J. Connolly, Kem H. Cook, Jeff Cooke, Asantha Cooray, Kevin R. Covey, Christopher S. Culliton, Roelof de Jong, Willem H. de Vries, Victor P. Debattista, Francisco Delgado, Ian P. Dell'Antonio, Saurav Dhital, Rosanne Di Stefano, Mark Dickinson, Benjamin Dilday, S.G. Djorgovski, Gregory Dobler, Ciro Donalek, Gregory Dubois-Felsmann, Josef Durech, Ardis Eliasdottir, Michael Eracleous, Laurent Eyer, Emilio E. Falco, Xiaohui Fan, Christopher D. Fassnacht, Harry C. Ferguson, Yanga R. Fernandez, Brian D. Fields, Douglas Finkbeiner, Eduardo E. Figueroa, Derek B. Fox, Harold Francke, James S. Frank, Josh Frieman, Sebastien Fromenteau, Muhammad Furqan, Gaspar Galaz, A. Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Eric Gawiser, John Geary, Perry Gee, Robert R. Gibson, Kirk Gilmore, Emily A. Grace, Richard F. Green, William J. Gressler, Carl J. Grillmair, Salman Habib, J. S. Haggerty, Mario Hamuy, Alan W. Harris, Suzanne L. Hawley, Alan F. Heavens, Leslie Hebb, Todd J. Henry, Edward Hileman, Eric J. Hilton, Keri Hoadley, J. B. Holberg, Matt J. Holman, Steve B. Howell, Leopoldo Infante, Zeljko Ivezic, Suzanne H. Jacoby, Bhuvnesh Jain, R, Jedicke, M. James Jee, J. Garrett Jernigan, Saurabh W. Jha, Kathryn V. Johnston, R. Lynne Jones, Mario Juric, Mikko Kaasalainen, Styliani Kafka, Steven M. Kahn, Nathan A. Kaib, Jason Kalirai, Jeff Kantor, Mansi M. Kasliwal, Charles R. Keeton, Richard Kessler, Zoran Knezevic, Adam Kowalski, Victor L. Krabbendam, K. Simon Krughoff, Shrinivas Kulkarni, Stephen Kuhlman, Mark Lacy, Sebastien Lepine, Ming Liang, Amy Lien, Paulina Lira, Knox S. Long, Suzanne Lorenz, Jennifer M. Lotz, R. H. Lupton, Julie Lutz, Lucas M. Macri, Ashish A. Mahabal, Rachel Mandelbaum, Phil Marshall, Morgan May, Peregrine M. McGehee, Brian T. Meadows, Alan Meert, Andrea Milani, Christopher J. Miller, Michelle Miller, David Mills, Dante Minniti, David Monet, Anjum S. Mukadam, Ehud Nakar, Douglas R. Neill, Jeffrey A. Newman, Sergei Nikolaev, Martin Nordby, Paul O'Connor, Masamune Oguri, John Oliver, Scot S. Olivier, Julia K. Olsen, Knut Olsen, Edward W. Olszewski, Hakeem Oluseyi, Nelson D. Padilla, Alex Parker, Joshua Pepper, John R. Peterson, Catherine Petry, Philip A. Pinto, James L. Pizagno, Bogdan Popescu, Andrej Prsa, Veljko Radcka, M. Jordan Raddick, Andrew Rasmussen, Arne Rau, Jeonghee Rho, James E. Rhoads, Gordon T. Richards, Stephen T. Ridgway, Brant E. Robertson, Rok Roskar, Abhijit Saha, Ata Sarajedini, Evan Scannapieco, Terry Schalk, Rafe Schindler, Samuel Schmidt, Sarah Schmidt, Donald P. Schneider, German Schumacher, Ryan Scranton, Jacques Sebag, Lynn G. Seppala, Ohad Shemmer, Joshua D. Simon, M. Sivertz, Howard A. Smith, J. Allyn Smith, Nathan Smith, Anna H. Spitz, Adam Stanford, Keivan G. Stassun, Jay Strader, Michael A. Strauss, Christopher W. Stubbs, Donald W. Sweeney, Alex Szalay, Paula Szkody, Masahiro Takada, Paul Thorman, David E. Trilling, Virginia Trimble, Anthony Tyson, Richard Van Berg, Daniel Vanden Berk, Jake VanderPlas, Licia Verde, Bojan Vrsnak, Lucianne M. Walkowicz, Benjamin D. Wandelt, Sheng Wang, Yun Wang, Michael Warner, Risa H. Wechsler, Andrew A. West, Oliver Wiecha, Benjamin F. Williams, Beth Willman, David Wittman, Sidney C. Wolff, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Przemek Wozniak, Patrick Young, Andrew Zentner, Hu Zhan
    A survey that can cover the sky in optical bands over wide fields to faint magnitudes with a fast cadence will enable many of the exciting science opportunities of the next decade. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will have an effective aperture of 6.7 meters and an imaging camera with field of view of 9.6 deg^2, and will be devoted to a ten-year imaging survey over 20,000 deg^2 south of +15 deg. Each pointing will be imaged 2000 times with fifteen second exposures in six broad bands from 0.35 to 1.1 microns, to a total point-source depth of r~27.5. The LSST Science Book describes the basic parameters of the LSST hardware, software, and observing plans. The book discusses educational and outreach opportunities, then goes on to describe a broad range of science that LSST will revolutionize: mapping the inner and outer Solar System, stellar populations in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, the structure of the Milky Way disk and halo and other objects in the Local Volume, transient and variable objects both at low and high redshift, and the properties of normal and active galaxies at low and high redshift. It then turns to far-field cosmological topics, exploring properties of supernovae to z~1, strong and weak lensing, the large-scale distribution of galaxies and baryon oscillations, and how these different probes may be combined to constrain cosmological models and the physics of dark energy.
  • We introduce Locally Linear Embedding (LLE) to the astronomical community as a new classification technique, using SDSS spectra as an example data set. LLE is a nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique which has been studied in the context of computer perception. We compare the performance of LLE to well-known spectral classification techniques, e.g. principal component analysis and line-ratio diagnostics. We find that LLE combines the strengths of both methods in a single, coherent technique, and leads to improved classification of emission-line spectra at a relatively small computational cost. We also present a data subsampling technique that preserves local information content, and proves effective for creating small, efficient training samples from a large, high-dimensional data sets. Software used in this LLE-based classification is made available.
  • We present the first results from the Distant Radio Galaxies Optically Non-detected in the SDSS (DRaGONS) Survey. Using a novel selection technique for identifying high redshift radio galaxy (HzRG) candidates, a large sample of bright (S_{1.4GHz} > 100mJy) radio sources from the FIRST survey having no optical counterpart in the SDSS is compiled. K-band imaging with the FLAMINGOS instrument on the 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak for 96 such candidates allows preliminary identification of HzRG candidates through the well-known K-z relation. Of the initial candidates, we identify 70 with magnitudes brighter than K \approx 19.5, and compute limiting magnitudes for the remainder. Assigning redshifts based on the K-z Hubble diagram gives a mean redshift for our sample of z=2.5 and a median redshift of z=2.0. This selection is also sensitive to a previously unseen population of anomalously red radio galaxies (r-K > 6.5-7), which may indicate significant obscuration at moderate redshifts. These obscured objects can be used to test the completeness of QSO surveys to the effects of reddenning. More than ten percent of our sample falls into this category, which may represent a sizable radio loud population missing from current optically selected AGN samples. We additionally identify 479 bright Extremely Red Objects (EROs) in the fields surrounding our HzRG candidates, to a magnitude of K=17.5, within a non-contiguous area of 2.38 square degrees. This constitutes a small overdensity of EROs surrounding the radio galaxy candidates over random fields, and we see possible evidence for a physical association of the EROs with the radio galaxies. However, examining the clustering of all K < 19.0 galaxies around the radio targets reveals no evidence of a global galaxy excess.
  • The evolution of the B-band galaxy luminosity function is measured using a sample of more than 11,000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey. The rest-frame M_B versus U-B color-magnitude diagram of DEEP2 galaxies shows that the color-magnitude bi-modality seen in galaxies locally is still present at redshifts z > 1. Dividing the sample at the trough of this color bimodality into predominantly red and blue galaxies, we find that the luminosity function of each galaxy color type evolves differently. Blue counts tend to shift to brighter magnitudes at constant number density, while the red counts remain largely constant at a fixed absolute magnitude. Using Schechter functions with fixed faint-end slopes we find that M*_B for blue galaxies brightens by ~ 1.3 magnitudes per unit redshift, with no significant evolution in number density. For red galaxies M*_B brightens somewhat less with redshift, while the formal value of phi* declines. When the population of blue galaxies is subdivided into two halves using the rest-frame color as the criterion, the measured evolution of both blue subpopulations is very similar.
  • We present measurements of the normalised redshift-space three-point correlation function (Q_z) of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) main galaxy sample. We have applied our "npt" algorithm to both a volume-limited (36738 galaxies) and magnitude-limited sample (134741 galaxies) of SDSS galaxies, and find consistent results between the two samples, thus confirming the weak luminosity dependence of Q_z recently seen by other authors. We compare our results to other Q_z measurements in the literature and find it to be consistent within the full jack-knife error estimates. However, we find these errors are significantly increased by the presence of the ``Sloan Great Wall'' (at z ~ 0.08) within these two SDSS datasets, which changes the 3-point correlation function (3PCF) by 70% on large scales (s>=10h^-1 Mpc). If we exclude this supercluster, our observed Q_z is in better agreement with that obtained from the 2dFGRS by other authors, thus demonstrating the sensitivity of these higher-order correlation functions to large-scale structures in the Universe. This analysis highlights that the SDSS datasets used here are not ``fair samples'' of the Universe for the estimation of higher-order clustering statistics and larger volumes are required. We study the shape-dependence of Q_z(s,q,theta) as one expects this measurement to depend on scale if the large scale structure in the Universe has grown via gravitational instability from Gaussian initial conditions. On small scales (s <= 6h^-1 Mpc), we see some evidence for shape-dependence in Q_z, but at present our measurements are consistent with a constant within the errors (Q_z ~ 0.75 +/- 0.05). On scales >10h^-1 Mpc, we see considerable shape-dependence in Q_z.
  • We study 16,707 quasar spectra from the SDSS using the Karhunen-Lo\`eve (KL) transform (or Principal Component Analysis, PCA). The quasar eigenspectra of the full catalog reveal the following: 1st order - the mean spectrum; 2nd order - a host-galaxy component; 3rd order - the UV-optical continuum slope; 4th order - the correlations of Balmer emission lines. We find that the spectral classification of quasars is redshift and luminosity dependent, as such there does not exist a compact set (< 10 modes) of eigenspectra (covering 900 to 8000 angstrom) which can describe most variations (> 95%) of the entire catalog. We therefore construct several sets of eigenspectra in different redshift and luminosity bins. From these eigenspectra we find that quasar spectra can be classified (by the first two eigenspectra) into a sequence that is defined by a simple progression in the steepness of the slope of the continuum. We also find a dependence on redshift and luminosity in the eigencoefficients. The dominant redshift effect is a result of the evolution of the blended FeII emission (optical) and the Balmer continuum (the ``small bump''). A luminosity dependence is also present in the eigencoefficients and is related to the Baldwin effect. The eigenspectra constructed from the wavelength-selected SDSS spectra are found to agree with the principal components by Francis et al. (1992) and the well-known ``Eigenvector-1'' (Boroson and Green 1992). (Abridged)
  • We present galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements over scales 0.025 to 10 Mpc/h in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a flux-limited sample of 127,001 lens galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts and mean luminosity <L> = L_* and 9,020,388 source galaxies with photometric redshifts, we invert the lensing signal to obtain the galaxy-mass correlation function xi_{gm}. We find xi_{gm} is consistent with a power-law, xi_{gm} = (r/r_0)^{-gamma}, with best-fit parameters gamma = 1.79 +/- 0.06 and r_0 = (5.4+/-0.7)(0.27/Omega_m)^{1/gamma} Mpc/h. At fixed separation, the ratio xi_{gg}/xi_{gm} = b/r where b is the bias and r is the correlation coefficient. Comparing to the galaxy auto-correlation function for a similarly selected sample of SDSS galaxies, we find that b/r is approximately scale independent over scales 0.2-6.7 Mpc/h, with mean <b/r> = (1.3+/-0.2)(Omega_m/0.27). We also find no scale dependence in b/r for a volume limited sample of luminous galaxies (-23.0 < M_r < -21.5). The mean b/r for this sample is <b/r>_{Vlim} = (2.0+/-0.7)(Omega_m/0.27). We split the lens galaxy sample into subsets based on luminosity, color, spectral type, and velocity dispersion, and see clear trends of the lensing signal with each of these parameters. The amplitude and logarithmic slope of xi_{gm} increases with galaxy luminosity. For high luminosities (L ~5 L_*), xi_{gm} deviates significantly from a power law. These trends with luminosity also appear in the subsample of red galaxies, which are more strongly clustered than blue galaxies.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) first data release provides a database of 106000 unique galaxies in the main galaxy sample with measured spectra. A sample of star-forming (SF) galaxies are identified from among the 3079 of these having 1.4 GHz luminosities from FIRST, by using optical spectral diagnostics. Using 1.4 GHz luminosities as a reference star formation rate (SFR) estimator insensitive to obscuration effects, the SFRs derived from the measured SDSS Halpha, [OII] and u-band luminosities, as well as far-infrared luminosities from IRAS, are compared. It is established that straightforward corrections for obscuration and aperture effects reliably bring the SDSS emission line and photometric SFR estimates into agreement with those at 1.4 GHz, although considerable scatter (~60%) remains in the relations. It thus appears feasible to perform detailed investigations of star formation for large and varied samples of SF galaxies through the available spectroscopic and photometric measurements from the SDSS. We provide herein exact prescriptions for determining the SFR for SDSS galaxies. The expected strong correlation between [OII] and Halpha line fluxes for SF galaxies is seen, but with a median line flux ratio F_[OII]/F_Halpha=0.23, about a factor of two smaller than that found in the sample of Kennicutt (1992). This correlation, used in deriving the [OII] SFRs, is consistent with the luminosity-dependent relation found by Jansen et al. (2001). The median obscuration for the SDSS SF systems is found to be A_Halpha=1.2 mag, while for the radio detected sample the median obscuration is notably higher, 1.6 mag, and with a broader distribution.
  • We present measurements of the angular cross-correlation between luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the cosmic microwave background temperature maps from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. We find a statistically significant achromatic positive correlation between these two data sets, which is consistent with the expected signal from the late Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. We do not detect any anti-correlation on small angular scales as would be produced from a large Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, although we do see evidence for some SZ effect for our highest redshift samples. Assuming a flat universe, our preliminary detection of the ISW effect provides independent physical evidence for the existence of dark energy.
  • The effective optical depth in the Ly-alpha forest region of 1061 low-resolution QSO spectra drawn from the SDSS database decreases with decreasing redshift over the range 2.5 < z < 4. Although the evolution is relatively smooth, tau_eff ~ (1+z)^{3.8 pm 0.2}, at z ~ 3.2 the effective optical depth decreases suddenly, by about ten percent with respect to this smoother evolution. It climbs back to the original smooth scaling again by z ~ 2.9. We describe two techniques, one of which is new, for quantifying this evolution which give consistent results. A variety of tests show that the feature is not likely to be a consequence of how the QSO sample was selected, nor the result of flux calibration or other systematic effects. Other authors have argued that, at this same epoch, the temperature of the IGM also shows a departure from an otherwise smooth decrease with time. These features in the evolution of the temperature and the optical depth are signatures of the reionization of He II.
  • A sample of nearly 9000 early-type galaxies, in the redshift range 0.01<z<0.3, was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using morphological and spectral criteria. The sample was used to study how early-type galaxy observables, including luminosity L, effective radius R, surface brightness I, color, and velocity dispersion V, are correlated with one another. Measurement biases are understood with mock catalogs which reproduce all of the observed scaling relations. At any given redshift, the intrinsic distribution of luminosities, sizes and velocity dispersions in our sample are all approximately Gaussian. In the r* band L ~ V^3.91, L ~ R^1.58, R ~ I^(-0.75), and the Fundamental Plane relation is R ~ V^(1.49) I^(-0.75). These relations are approximately the same in the g*, i* and z* bands. At fixed luminosity, the mass-to-light ratio scales as M/L ~ L^0.14. The g*-r* color scales as V^0.25. Color also correlates with magnitude and size, but these correlations are entirely due to the L-V and R-V relations. Chemical evolution and star formation histories are investigated using co-added spectra of similar objects in our sample. Chemical abundances correlate primarily with velocity dispersion. At fixed V, the higher redshift population is bluer, is weaker in Mg2, and is stronger in Hbeta than the population nearby. In addition, the population at higher redshifts is slightly more luminous. These differences are consistent with that of a passively evolving population which formed the bulk of its stars about 9 Gyrs ago. The Fundamental Plane suggests that galaxies in dense regions are slightly different from those in less dense regions, but the co-added spectra and color--magnitude relations show no statistically significant dependence on environment.
  • We present moderate resolution Keck spectroscopy of quasars at z=5.82, 5.99 and 6.28, discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that the Ly Alpha absorption in the spectra of these quasars evolves strongly with redshift. To z~5.7, the Ly Alpha absorption evolves as expected from an extrapolation from lower redshifts. However, in the highest redshift object, SDSSp J103027.10+052455.0 (z=6.28), the average transmitted flux is 0.0038+-0.0026 times that of the continuum level over 8450 A < lambda < 8710 A (5.95<z(abs)<6.16), consistent with zero flux. Thus the flux level drops by a factor of >150, and is consistent with zero flux in the Ly Alpha forest region immediately blueward of the Ly Alpha emission line, compared with a drop by a factor of ~10 at z(abs)~5.3. A similar break is seen at Ly Beta; because of the decreased oscillator strength of this transition, this allows us to put a considerably stronger limit, tau(eff) > 20, on the optical depth to Ly Alpha absorption at z=6. This is a clear detection of a complete Gunn-Peterson trough, caused by neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium. Even a small neutral hydrogen fraction in the intergalactic medium would result in an undetectable flux in the Ly Alpha forest region. Therefore, the existence of the Gunn-Peterson trough by itself does not indicate that the quasar is observed prior to the reionization epoch. However, the fast evolution of the mean absorption in these high-redshift quasars suggests that the mean ionizing background along the line of sight to this quasar has declined significantly from z~5 to 6, and the universe is approaching the reionization epoch at z~6.
  • We describe the target selection and resulting properties of a spectroscopic sample of luminous, red galaxies (LRG) from the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These galaxies are selected on the basis of color and magnitude to yield a sample of luminous, intrinsically red galaxies that extends fainter and further than the main flux-limited portion of the SDSS galaxy spectroscopic sample. The sample is designed to impose a passively-evolving luminosity and rest-frame color cut to a redshift of 0.38. Additional, yet more luminous, red galaxies are included to a redshift of 0.5. Approximately 12 of these galaxies per square degree are targeted for spectroscopy, so the sample will number over 100,000 with the full survey. SDSS commissioning data indicate that the algorithm efficiently selects luminous (M_g=-21.4), red galaxies, that the spectroscopic success rate is very high, and that the resulting set of galaxies is approximately volume-limited out to z=0.38. When the SDSS is complete, the LRG spectroscopic sample will fill over 1h^-3 Gpc^3 with an approximately homogeneous population of galaxies and will therefore be well suited to studies of large-scale structure and clusters out to z=0.5.
  • Early data taken during commissioning of the SDSS have resulted in the discovery of a very cool white dwarf. It appears to have stronger collision induced absorption from molecular hydrogen than any other known white dwarf, suggesting it has a cooler temperature than any other. While its distance is presently unknown, it has a surprisingly small proper motion, making it unlikely to be a halo star. An analysis of white dwarf cooling times suggests that this object may be a low-mass star with a helium core. The SDSS imaging and spectroscopy also recovered LHS 3250, the coolest previously known white dwarf, indicating that the SDSS will be an effective tool for identifying these extreme objects.
  • We present an analysis of the star formation rate in galaxies between 0.7<z<1.8 using Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrograph (NICMOS) grism spectral observations. We detect 163 galaxies in an area of ~4.4 square arcminutes, 37 of which show possible H-alpha emission. We extend the observed H-alpha luminosity function (LF) in this redshift range to luminosities a factor of two fainter than earlier work, and are consistent in the region of overlap. Using the H-alpha LF, we estimate a star formation rate (SFR) density in this redshift range of 0.166 M_sun/yr/Mpc^3 (H0=75 km/s/Mpc), consistent with other estimates based on emission lines, and supporting the order of magnitude increase in SFR density between z=0 and z=1. Our measurement of SFR density is a factor of ~2-3 greater than that estimated from UV data, comparable to the factor observed locally, implying little evolution in the relative extinctions between UV and H-alpha out to z~1.3.
  • In this paper, we outline the use of Mixture Models in density estimation of large astronomical databases. This method of density estimation has been known in Statistics for some time but has not been implemented because of the large computational cost. Herein, we detail an implementation of the Mixture Model density estimation based on multi-resolutional KD-trees which makes this statistical technique into a computationally tractable problem. We provide the theoretical and experimental background for using a mixture model of Gaussians based on the Expectation Maximization (EM) Algorithm. Applying these analyses to simulated data sets we show that the EM algorithm - using the AIC penalized likelihood to score the fit - out-performs the best kernel density estimate of the distribution while requiring no ``fine--tuning'' of the input algorithm parameters. We find that EM can accurately recover the underlying density distribution from point processes thus providing an efficient adaptive smoothing method for astronomical source catalogs. To demonstrate the general application of this statistic to astrophysical problems we consider two cases of density estimation: the clustering of galaxies in redshift space and the clustering of stars in color space. From these data we show that EM provides an adaptive smoothing of the distribution of galaxies in redshift space (describing accurately both the small and large-scale features within the data) and a means of identifying outliers in multi-dimensional color-color space (e.g. for the identification of high redshift QSOs). Automated tools such as those based on the EM algorithm will be needed in the analysis of the next generation of astronomical catalogs (2MASS, FIRST, PLANCK, SDSS) and ultimately in in the development of the National Virtual Observatory.
  • We report the discovery of five quasars with redshifts of 4.67 - 5.27 and z'-band magnitudes of 19.5-20.7 M_B ~ -27. All were originally selected as distant quasar candidates in optical/near-infrared photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and most were confirmed as probable high-redshift quasars by supplementing the SDSS data with J and K measurements. The quasars possess strong, broad Lyman-alpha emission lines, with the characteristic sharp cutoff on the blue side produced by Lyman-alpha forest absorption. Three quasars contain strong, broad absorption features, and one of them exhibits very strong N V emission. The amount of absorption produced by the Lyman-alpha forest increases toward higher redshift, and that in the z=5.27 object (D_A ~ 0.7) is consistent with a smooth extrapolation of the absorption seen in lower redshift quasars. The high luminosity of these objects relative to most other known objects at z >~ 5 makes them potentially valuable as probes of early quasar properties and of the intervening intergalactic medium.
  • Studies of the distribution and evolution of galaxies are of fundamental importance to modern cosmology; these studies, however, are hampered by the complexity of the competing effects of spectral and density evolution. Constructing a spectroscopic sample that is able to unambiguously disentangle these processes is currently excessively prohibitive due to the observational requirements. This paper extends and applies an alternative approach that relies on statistical estimates for both distance (z) and spectral type to a deep multi-band dataset that was obtained for this exact purpose. These statistical estimates are extracted directly from the photometric data by capitalizing on the inherent relationships between flux, redshift, and spectral type. These relationships are encapsulated in the empirical photometric redshift relation which we extend to z ~ 1.2, with an intrinsic dispersion of dz = 0.06. We also develop realistic estimates for the photometric redshift error for individual objects, and introduce the utilization of the galaxy ensemble as a tool for quantifying both a cosmological parameter and its measured error. We present deep, multi-band, optical number counts as a demonstration of the integrity of our sample. Using the photometric redshift and the corresponding redshift error, we can divide our data into different redshift intervals and spectral types. As an example application, we present the number redshift distribution as a function of spectral type.
  • This study presents a wide-field near-infrared (K-band) survey in two fields; SA 68 and Lynx 2. The survey covers an area of 0.6 deg.$^2$, complete to K=16.5. A total of 867 galaxies are detected in this survey of which 175 have available redshifts. The near-infrared number counts to K=16.5 mag. are estimated from the complete photometric survey and are found to be in close agreement with other available studies. The sample is corrected for incompleteness in redshift space, using selection function in the form of a Fermi-Dirac distribution. This is then used to estimate the local near-infrared luminosity function of galaxies. A Schechter fit to the infrared data gives: M$^\ast_K = -25.1 \pm 0.3$, $\alpha = -1.3\pm 0.2$ and $\phi^\ast =(1.5\pm 0.5)\times 10^{-3}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ (for H$_0=50$ Km/sec/Mpc and q$_0=0.5$). When reduced to $\alpha=-1$, this agrees with other available estimates of the local IRLF. We find a steeper slope for the faint-end of the infrared luminosity function when compared to previous studies. This is interpreted as due to the presence of a population of faint but evolved (metal rich) galaxies in the local Universe. However, it is not from the same population as the faint blue galaxies found in the optical surveys. The characteristic magnitude ($M^\ast_K$) of the local IRLF indicates that the bright red galaxies ($M_K\sim -27$ mag.) have a space density of $\le 5\times 10^{-5}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ and hence, are not likely to be local objects.
  • We present strong evidence for the existence of a supercluster at a redshift of z=0.54 in the direction of Selected Area 68. From the distribution of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts we find that there is a large over-density of galaxies (a factor of four over the number expected in an unclustered universe) within the redshift range 0.530 < z < 0.555. By considering the spatial distribution of galaxies within this redshift range (using spectroscopic and photometric redshifts) we show that the galaxies in SA68 form a linear structure passing from the South-West of the survey field through to the North-East (with a position angle of approximately 35 deg East of North). This position angle is coincident with the positions of the X-ray clusters CL0016+16, RX J0018.3+1618 and a new X-ray cluster, RX J0018.8+1602, centered near the radio source 54W084. All three of these sources are at a redshift of approximately z=0.54 and have position angles, derived from their X-ray photon distributions, consistent with that measured for the supercluster. Assuming a redshift of 0.54 for the distribution of galaxies and a FWHM dispersion in redshift of 0.020 this represents a coherent structure with a radial extent of 31 Mpc, transverse dimension of 12 Mpc, and a thickness of approximately 4 Mpc. The detection of this possible supercluster demonstrates the power of using X-ray observations, combined with multicolor observations, to map the large scale distribution of galaxies at intermediate redshifts.