• We obtain constraints on cosmological parameters from the spherically averaged redshift-space correlation function of the CMASS Data Release 9 (DR9) sample of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We combine this information with additional data from recent CMB, SN and BAO measurements. Our results show no significant evidence of deviations from the standard flat-Lambda CDM model, whose basic parameters can be specified by Omega_m = 0.285 +- 0.009, 100 Omega_b = 4.59 +- 0.09, n_s = 0.96 +- 0.009, H_0 = 69.4 +- 0.8 km/s/Mpc and sigma_8 = 0.80 +- 0.02. The CMB+CMASS combination sets tight constraints on the curvature of the Universe, with Omega_k = -0.0043 +- 0.0049, and the tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio, for which we find r < 0.16 at the 95 per cent confidence level (CL). These data show a clear signature of a deviation from scale-invariance also in the presence of tensor modes, with n_s <1 at the 99.7 per cent CL. We derive constraints on the fraction of massive neutrinos of f_nu < 0.049 (95 per cent CL), implying a limit of sum m_nu < 0.51 eV. We find no signature of a deviation from a cosmological constant from the combination of all datasets, with a constraint of w_DE = -1.033 +- 0.073 when this parameter is assumed time-independent, and no evidence of a departure from this value when it is allowed to evolve as w_DE(a) = w_0 + w_a (1 - a). The achieved accuracy on our cosmological constraints is a clear demonstration of the constraining power of current cosmological observations.
  • We present all-sky simulated Fermi maps of gamma-rays from dark matter decay and annihilation in the Local Universe. The dark matter distribution is obtained from a constrained cosmological simulation of the neighboring large-scale structure provided by the CLUES project. The dark matter fields of density and density squared are then taken as an input for the Fermi observation simulation tool to predict the gamma-ray photon counts that Fermi would detect in 5 years of all-sky survey for given dark matter models. Signal-to-noise sky maps have also been obtained by adopting the current Galactic and isotropic diffuse background models released by the Fermi collaboration. We point out the possibility for Fermi to detect a dark matter gamma-ray signal in local extragalactic structures. In particular, we conclude here that Fermi observations of nearby clusters (e.g. Virgo and Coma) and filaments are expected to give stronger constraints on decaying dark matter compared to previous studies. As an example, we find a significant signal-to-noise ratio in dark matter models with a decay rate fitting the positron excess as measured by PAMELA. This is the first time that dark matter filaments are shown to be promising targets for indirect detection of dark matter. On the other hand, the prospects for detectability of annihilating dark matter in local extragalactic structures are less optimistic even with extreme cross-sections. We make the dark matter density and density squared maps available online at http://www.clues-project.org/articles/darkmattermaps.html
  • The munuSSM is a supersymmetric model that has been proposed to solve the problems generated by other supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics. Given that R-parity is broken in the munuSSM, the gravitino is a natural candidate for decaying dark matter since its lifetime becomes much longer than the age of the Universe. In this model, gravitino dark matter could be detectable through the emission of a monochromatic gamma ray in a two-body decay. We study the prospects of the Fermi-LAT telescope to detect such monochromatic lines in 5 years of observations of the most massive nearby extragalactic objects. The dark matter halo around the Virgo galaxy cluster is selected as a reference case, since it is associated to a particularly high signal-to-noise ratio and is located in a region scarcely affected by the astrophysical diffuse emission from the galactic plane. The simulation of both signal and background gamma-ray events is carried out with the Fermi Science Tools, and the dark matter distribution around Virgo is taken from a N-body simulation of the nearby extragalactic Universe, with constrained initial conditions provided by the CLUES project. We find that a gravitino with a mass range of 0.6 to 2 GeV, and with a lifetime range of about 3x10^27 to 2x10^28 s would be detectable by the Fermi-LAT with a signal-to-noise ratio larger than 3. We also obtain that gravitino masses larger than about 4 GeV are already excluded in the munuSSM by Fermi-LAT data of the galactic halo
  • Using CLARA (Code for Lyman Alpha Radiation Analysis) we constrain the escape fraction of Lyman-Alpha radiation in galaxies in the redshift range 5<z<7, based on the MareNostrum High-z Universe, a SPH cosmological simulation with more than 2 billion particles. We approximate Lyman-Alpha Emitters (LAEs) as dusty gaseous slabs with Lyman-Alpha radiation sources homogeneously mixed in the gas. Escape fractions for such a configuration and for different gas and dust contents are calculated using our newly developed radiative transfer code CLARA. The results are applied to the MareNostrum High-z Universe numerical galaxies. The model shows a weak redshift evolution and good agreement with estimations of the escape fraction as a function of reddening from observations at z \sim 2.2 and z \sim 3. We extend the slab model by including additional dust in a clumpy component in order to reproduce the UV con- tinuum luminosity function and UV colours at redshifts z>~5. The LAE Luminosity Function (LF) based on the extended clumpy model reproduces broadly the bright end of the LF derived from observations at z \sim 5 and z \sim 6. At z \sim 7 our model over-predicts the LF by roughly a factor of four, presumably because the effects of the neutral intergalactic medium are not taken into account. The remaining tension between the observed and simulated faint end of the LF, both in the UV-continuum and Lyman-Alpha at redshifts z \sim 5 and z \sim 6 points towards an overabundance of simulated LAEs hosted in haloes of masses 1.0x10^10h-1Msol < Mh < 4.0x10^10h-1Msol. Given the difficulties in explaining the observed overabundance by dust absorption, a probable origin of the mismatch are the high star formation rates in the simulated haloes around the quoted mass range. A more efficient supernova feedback should be able to regulate the star formation process in the shallow potential wells of these haloes.
  • (Abridged) Virial mass is used as an estimator for the mass of a dark matter halo. However, the commonly used constant overdensity criterion does not reflect the dynamical structure of haloes. Here we analyze dark matter cosmological simulations in order to obtain properties of haloes of different masses focusing on the size of the region with zero mean radial velocity. Dark matter inside this region is stationary, and thus the mass of this region is a much better approximation for the virial mass. We call this mass the static mass to distinguish from the commonly used constant overdensity mass. We also study the relation of this static mass with the traditional virial mass, and we find that the matter inside galaxy-size haloes is underestimated by the virial mass by nearly a factor of two. At redshift zero the virial mass is close to the static mass for cluster-size haloes. The same pattern - large haloes having M_vir > M_static - exists at all redshifts, but the transition mass M_0 = M_vir = M_static decreases dramatically with increasing redshift. When rescaled to the same M_0 haloes clearly demonstrate a self-similar behaviour, which in a statistical sense gives a relation between the static and virial mass. To our surprise we find that the abundance of haloes with a given static mass, i.e. the static mass function, is very accurately fitted by the Press & Schechter approximation at z=0, but this approximation breaks at higher redshifts. Instead, the virial mass function is well fitted as usual by the Sheth & Tormen approximation. We find an explanation why the static radius can be 2-3 times larger as compared with the constant overdensity estimate. Applying the non-stationary Jeans equation we find that the role of the pressure gradients is significantly larger for small haloes.
  • Using the high resolution cosmological N-body simulation MareNostrum Universe we study the orientation of shape and angular momentum of galaxy-size dark matter haloes around large voids. We find that haloes located on the shells of the largest cosmic voids have angular momenta that tend to be preferentially perpendicular to the direction that joins the centre of the halo and the centre of the void. This alignment has been found in spiral galaxies around voids using galaxy redshift surveys. We measure for the first time the strength of this alignment, showing how it falls off with increasing distance to the centre of the void. We also confirm the correlation between the intensity of this alignment and the halo mass. The analysis of the orientation of the halo main axes confirms the results of previous works. Moreover, we find a similar alignment for the baryonic matter inside dark matter haloes, which is much stronger in their inner parts.