• The $\nu0h_{9/2}$ and $\nu0i_{13/2}$ strength at $^{137}$Xe, a single neutron outside the $N=82$ shell closure, has been determined using the $^{136}$Xe($\alpha$,$^3$He)$^{137}$Xe reaction carried out at 100 MeV. We confirm the recent observation of the second 13/2$^+$ state and reassess previous data on the 9/2$^-$ states, obtaining spectroscopic factors. These new data provide additional constraints on predictions of the same single-neutron excitations at $^{133}$Sn.
  • Low-spin states in the neutron-rich, N = 90 nuclide $^{146}$Ba were populated following $\beta$-decay of $^{146}$Cs, with the goal of clarifying the development of deformation in Ba isotopes through delineation of their non-yrast structures. Fission fragments of $^{146}$Cs were extracted from a 1.7-Ci $^{252}$Cf source and mass-selected using the CARIBU facility. Low-energy ions were deposited at the center of a box of thin $\beta$ detectors, surrounded by a high-efficiency HPGe array. The new $^{146}$Ba decay scheme now contains 31 excited levels extending up to ~2.5 MeV excitation energy, double what was previously known. These data are compared to predictions from the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) model. It appears that the abrupt shape change found at N = 90 in Sm and Gd is much more gradual in Ba and Ce, due to an enhanced role of the $\gamma$ degree of freedom.
  • The pairing properties of the neutrinoless double beta decay $(0\nu2\beta)$ candidate $^{100}$Mo have been studied, along with its daughter $^{100}$Ru, to provide input for nuclear matrix element calculations relevant to the decay. The $(p,t)$ two-neutron transfer reaction was measured on nuclei of $^{102,100}$Ru and $^{100,98}$Mo. The experiment was designed to have particular sensitivity to $0^{+}$ states up to excitation energies of $\sim 3$ MeV with high energy resolution. Measurements were made at two angles and L=0 transitions identified by the ratio of yields between the two angles. For the reactions leading to and from $^{100}$Ru, greater than 95% of the L=0 $(p,t)$ strength was in the ground state, but in $^{100}$Mo about 20% was in excited $0^{+}$ states. The measured $(p,t)$ data, together with existing $(t,p)$ data, suggest that $^{100}$Mo is a shape-transitional nucleus while $^{100}$Ru is closer to the spherical side of that transition. Theoretical calculations of the $0\nu2\beta$ nuclear matrix element may be complicated by this difference in shape.