• A numerical model for the solar modulation of cosmic rays, based on the solution of a set of stochastic differential equations, is used to illustrate the effects of modifying the heliospheric magnetic field, particularly in the polar regions of the heliosphere. To this end, the dfferences in the modulation brought about by each of three choices for the heliospheric magnetic field, i.e. the unmodified Parker field, the Smith-Bieber modified field, and the Jokipii-Kota modified field, are studied. It is illustrated that both the Jokipii-Kota and Smith-Bieber modifications are effective in modifying the Parker field in the polar regions. In addition, it is argued that the modification of Smith and Bieber is based on observational evidence and has a firm physical basis, while these motivations are lacking in the case of the Jokipii-Kota modification. From a cosmic ray modulation point of view, we found the Smith-Bieber modification to be the most suitable choice for modifying the heliospheric magnetic field. The features and effects of these three modifications are illustrated both qualitatively and quantitatively. It is also shown how the Smith-Bieber modified field can be applied in cosmic ray modulation models to reproduce observational cosmic ray proton spectra from the PAMELA mission during the solar minimum of 2006 - 2009. These results are compared with those obtained in previous studies of this unusual solar minimum activity period and found to be in good qualitative agreement.
  • Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of gamma-ray millisecond pulsar light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ~10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new millisecond pulsars, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic millisecond pulsars to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day millisecond pulsars. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow and redback systems. Since millisecond pulsars are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of millisecond pulsars are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by AMS-02, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by black widows and redbacks may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.
  • Millisecond pulsars occur abundantly in globular clusters. They are expected to be responsible for several spectral components in the radio through gamma-ray waveband (e.g., involving synchrotron and inverse Compton emission), as have been seen by Radio Telescope Effelsberg, Chandra X-ray Observatory, Fermi Large Area Telescope, and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in the case of Terzan 5 (with fewer spectral components seen for other globular clusters). H.E.S.S. has recently performed a stacking analysis involving 15 non-detected globular clusters and obtained quite constraining average flux upper limits above 230 GeV. We present a model that assumes millisecond pulsars as sources of relativistic particles and predicts multi-wavelength emission from globular clusters. We apply this model to the population of clusters mentioned above to predict the average spectrum and compare this to the H.E.S.S. upper limits. Such comparison allows us to test whether the model is viable, leading to possible constraints on various average cluster parameters within this framework.
  • Pulsars are believed to be sources of relativistic electrons and positrons. The abundance of detections of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars by Fermi Large Area Telescope coupled with their light curve characteristics that imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, motivated us to investigate this old pulsar population as a source of Galactic electrons and positrons and their contribution to the enhancement in cosmic-ray positron flux at GeV energies. We use a population synthesis code to predict the source properties (number, position, and power) of the present-day Galactic millisecond pulsars, taking into account the latest Fermi and radio observations to calibrate the model output. Next, we simulate pair cascade spectra from these pulsars using a model that invokes an offset-dipole magnetic field. We assume free escape of the pairs from the pulsar environment. We then compute the cumulative spectrum of transported electrons and positrons at Earth, following their diffusion and energy losses as they propagate through the Galaxy. Our results indicate that the predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Comparing our predicted spectrum and positron fraction to measurements by AMS-02, PAMELA, and Fermi, we find that millisecond pulsars are only modest contributors at a few tens of GeV, after which this leptonic spectral component cuts off. The positron fraction is therefore only slightly enhanced above 10 GeV relative to a background flux model. This implies that alternative sources such as young, nearby pulsars and supernova remnants should contribute additional primary positrons within the astrophysical scenario.
  • Globular clusters (GCs) are astronomical tapestries embroidered with an abundance of exotic stellar-type objects. Their high age promises a rich harvest of evolved stellar products, while the deep potential wells and high mass densities at their centres probably facilitate the formation of multiple-member stellar systems via increased stellar encounter rates. The ubiquity of low-mass X-ray binaries, thought to be the progenitors of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), explain the large number of observed GC radio pulsars and X-ray counterparts. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) recently unveiled the first gamma-ray GC pulsar (PSR J1823-3021A). The first observations of GCs in the GeV and TeV bands furthermore created much excitement, and in view of the above, it seems natural to explain these high-energy lanterns by investigating an MSP origin. An MSP population is expected to radiate several pulsed spectral components in the radio through gamma-ray wavebands, in addition to being sources of relativistic particles. The latter may interact with background photons in the clusters producing TeV excesses, while they may also radiate synchrotron photons as they traverse the cluster magnetic field. We present multiwavelength modelling results for Terzan 5. We also briefly discuss some alternative interpretations for the observed GC gamma-ray signals.
  • Context. Spacecraft observations have motivated the need for a refined description of the phase-space distribution function. Of particular importance is the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient that occurs in the Fokker-Planck transport equation. Aims. Simulations and analytical test-particle theories are compared to verify the diffusion description of particle transport, which does not allow for non-Markovian behavior. Methods. A Monte-Carlo simulation code was used to trace the trajectories of test particles moving in turbulent magnetic fields. From the ensemble average, the pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficient is obtained via the mean square displacement. Results. It is shown that, while excellent agreement with analytical theories can be obtained for slab turbulence, considerable deviations are found for isotropic turbulence. In addition, all Fokker-Planck coefficients tend to zero for high time values.
  • The transport environment for particles in the heliosphere, e.g. galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and MeV electrons (including those originating from Jupiters magnetosphere), is defined by the solar wind flow and the structure of the embedded heliospheric magnetic field. Solar wind structures, such as co-rotating interaction regions (CIR), can result in periodically modulation of both particles species. A detailed analysis of this recurrent Jovian electron events and galactic cosmic ray decreases measured by SOHO EPHIN is presented here, showing clearly a change of phase between both phenomena during the cause of the years 2007 and 2008. This effect can be explained by the change of difference in heliolongitude between the Earth and Jupiter, which is of central importance for the propagation of Jovian electrons. Furthermore, the data can be ordered such that the 27-day Jovian electron variation vanishes in the sector which does not connect the Earth with Jupiter magnetically using observed solar wind speeds.
  • Diffuse X-ray emission has recently been detected from the globular cluster (GC) Terzan 5, extending out to ~2.5' from the cluster centre. This emission may arise from synchrotron radiation (SR) by energetic leptons being injected into the cluster by the resident millisecond pulsar (MSP) population that interact with the cluster field. These leptons may also be reaccelerated in shocks created by collisions of pulsar winds, and may interact with bright starlight and cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons, yielding gamma rays at very high energies (VHE) through the inverse Compton (IC) process. In the GeV range, Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a population of GCs, very plausibly including Terzan 5, their spectral properties and energetics being consistent with cumulative magnetospheric emission from a population of MSPs. H.E.S.S. has furthermore detected a VHE excess in the direction of Terzan 5. One may derive constraints on the number of MSPs, N_tot, and the radial profiles of the GC B-field, stellar energy density, as well as the diffusion coefficient using the spatially-resolved X-ray, high-energy (HE), and VHE fluxes. If the Fermi LAT flux is due to magnetospheric processes, it will scale with the number of visible gamma-ray MSPs, N_vis. The HE spectrum therefore provides an independent way of constraining the number of MSPs (since N_tot >= N_vis). Consequently, the synthesis of available multiwavelength data presents a unique opportunity to constrain several parameters of the GC Terzan 5.
  • The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has recently detected a population of globular clusters (GCs) in high-energy (HE) gamma-rays. Their spectral properties and energetics are consistent with cumulative emission from a population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) hosted by these clusters. For example, the HE spectra exhibit fairly hard power-law indices and cutoffs around a few GeV, typical of pulsed spectra measured for the gamma-ray pulsar population. The energetics may be used to constrain the number of visible MSPs in the cluster (N_vis), assuming canonical values for the average gamma-ray efficiency and spin-down power. This interpretation is indeed strengthened by the fact that the first gamma-ray MSP has now been identified in the GC NGC 6624, and this MSP is responsible for almost all of the HE emission from this cluster. On the other hand, it has been argued that the MSPs are also sources of relativistic leptons which may be reaccelerated in shocks originating in collisions of stellar winds in the cluster core, and may upscatter bright starlight and cosmic microwave background photons to very high energies. Therefore, this unpulsed component may give an independent constraint on the total number of MSPs (N_tot) hosted in the GC, for a given cluster magnetic field B and diffusion coefficient k_0. Lastly, the transport properties of the energetic leptons may be further constrained using multiwavelength data, e.g., to infer the radial dependence of k_0 and B. We present results on our modeling of the pulsed and unpulsed gamma-ray fluxes from the GC Terzan 5.
  • First results of the differential cross section in dp elastic scattering at 1.25 GeV/u measured with the HADES over a large angular range are reported. The obtained data corresponds to large transverse momenta, where a high sensitivity to the two-nucleon and three-nucleon short-range correlations is expected.
  • The preliminary results on charged pion production in np collisions at an incident beam energy of 1.25 GeV measured with HADES are presented. The np reactions were isolated in dp collisions at 1.25 GeV/u using the Forward Wall hodoscope, which allowed to register spectator protons. The results for np -> pppi-, np -> nppi+pi- and np -> dpi+pi- channels are compared with OPE calculations. A reasonable agreement between experimental results and the predictions of the OPE+OBE model is observed.
  • In this work linear stability analysis of a four-fluid optically thin plasma consisting of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and charged dust particles is performed with respect to the radiation-condensation (RC) instability. The energy budget of the plasma involves the input from heating through photo-electron emission by dust particles under external ultraviolet radiation as well as radiative losses in inelastic electron-neutral, electron-ion, neutral-neutral collisions. It is shown that negatively charged particles stimulate the RC instability in the sense that the conditions for the instability to hold are wider than similar conditions in a single-fluid description.
  • We have studied the impact of cosmic-ray acceleration in SNR on the spectra of cosmic-ray nuclei in the Galaxy using a series expansion of the propagation equation, which allows us to use analytical solutions for part of the problem and an efficient numerical treatment of the remaining equations and thus accurately describes the cosmic-ray propagation on small scales around their sources in three spatial dimensions and time. We found strong variations of the cosmic-ray nuclei flux by typically 20% with occasional spikes of much higher amplitude, but only minor changes in the spectral distribution. The locally measured spectra of primary cosmic rays fit well into the obtained range of possible spectra. We further showed that the spectra of the secondary element Boron show almost no variations, so that the above findings also imply significant fluctuations of the Boron-to-Carbon ratio. Therefore the commonly used method of determining CR propagation parameters by fitting secondary-to-primary ratios appears flawed on account of the variations that these ratios would show throughout the Galaxy.
  • The remanent magnetisation of meteorite material in the solar system indicates that magnetic fields of several Gauss are present in the protoplanetary disk. It is shown that such relativelystrong magnetic fields can be generated in dusty protoplanetary disks by relative shear motions of the charged dust and the neutral gas components. Self-consistent multi-fluid simulations show that for typical plasma parameters shear flows with collisional momentum transfer between the different components of the dusty plasma result in a very efficient generation of magnetic fields with strengths of about 0.1-1 Gauss on spatial scales of two astronomical units in about one year. Based on the simulations one may predict that future measurements will reveal the strong magnetisation of circumstellar disks around young stellar objects.