• Using six-dimesional phase-space information from the Fourth Data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) over the range of Galactic longitude 240$^{\circ}< l <$ 360$^{\circ}$ and $V_{LSR} < -239$ kms$^{-1}$, we have computed orbits for 329 RAVE stars that were originally selected as chemically and kinematically related to $\omega$ Centauri. The orbits were integrated in a Milky-Way-like axisymmetric Galactic potential, ignoring the effects of the dynamical evolution of $\omega$ Centauri due to the tidal effects of the Galaxy disk on the cluster along time. We also ignored secular changes in the Milky Way potential over time. In a Monte Carlo scheme, and under the assumption that the stars may have been ejected with velocities greater than the escape velocity ($V_{rel}>V_{esc,0}$) from the cluster, we identified 15 stars as having close encounters with $\omega$ Centauri: (\textit{i}) 8 stars with relative velocities $V_{rel}< 200 $ kms$^{-1}$ may have been ejected $\sim$ 200 Myr ago from $\omega$ Centauri; (\textit{ii}) other group of 7 stars were identified with high relative velocity $V_{rel}> 200 $ kms$^{-1}$ during close encounters, and seems unlikely that they have been ejected from $\omega$ Centauri. We also confirm the link between J131340.4-484714 as potential member of $\omega$ Centauri, and probably ejected $\sim$ 2.0 Myr ago, with a relative velocity $V_{rel}\sim80$ kms$^{-1}$.
  • We study the shape of the thick disc using photometric data at high and intermediate latitudes from SDSS and 2MASS surveys. We use the population synthesis approach using an ABC-MCMC method to characterize the thick disc shape, scale height, scale length, local density and flare, and we investigate the extend of the thick disc formation period by simulating several formation episodes. We find that the vertical variation in density is not exponential, but much closer to an hyperbolic secant squared. Assuming a single formation epoch, the thick disc is better fitted with a sech2 scale height of 470 pc and a scale length of 2.3 kpc. However if one simulates two successive formation episodes, mimicking an extended formation period, the older episode has a higher scale height and a larger scale length than the younger episode, indicating a contraction during the collapse phase. The scale height decreases from 800 pc to 340 pc, and the scale length from 3.2 kpc to 2 kpc. The star formation increases from the old episode to the young one. During the fitting process, the halo parameters are also determined. The constraint on the halo shows that a transition between a inner and outer halo, if exists, cannot be at a distance of less than about 30 kpc, which is the limit of our investigation using turnoff halo stars. Finally, we show that extrapolating the thick disc towards the bulge region explains well the stellar populations observed there, that there is no longer need to invoke a classical bulge. To explain these results, the most probable scenario for the thick disc is that it formed while the Galaxy was gravitationally collapsing from well mixed gas-rich giant clumps sustained by high turbulence which awhile prevent a thin disc to form, as proposed by Bournaud et al. (2009). This scenario explains the observations in the thick disc region as well as in the bulge region. (abridged)