• Models aiming to explain the formation of massive black hole seeds, and in particular the direct collapse scenario, face substantial difficulties. These are rooted in rather ad hoc and fine-tuned initial conditions, such as the simultaneous requirements of extremely low metallicities and strong radiation backgrounds. Here we explore a modification of such scenarios where a massive primordial star cluster is initially produced. Subsequent stellar collisions give rise to the formation of massive (10^4 - 10^5 solar mass) objects. Our calculations demonstrate that the interplay between stellar dynamics, gas accretion and protostellar evolution is particularly relevant. Gas accretion onto the protostars enhances their radii, resulting in an enhanced collisional cross section. We show that the fraction of collisions can increase from 0.1-1% of the initial population to about 10% when compared to gas-free models or models of protostellar clusters in the local Universe. We conclude that very massive objects can form in spite of initial fragmentation, making the first massive protostellar clusters viable candidate birth places for observed supermassive black holes.
  • We present the first detection of a jet in the far-IR [O I] lines from an intermediate mass protostar. We have carried out a Herschel/PACS spectral mapping study in the [O I] lines of OMC-2 FIR 3 and FIR 4, two of the most luminous protostars in Orion outside of the Orion Nebula. The spatial morphology of the fine structure line emission reveals the presence of an extended photodissociation region (PDR) and a narrow, but intense jet connecting the two protostars. The jet seen in [O I] emission is spatially aligned with the Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 micron jet and the CO (6-5) molecular outflow centered on FIR 3. The mass loss rate derived from the total [O I] 63 micron line luminosity of the jet is 7.7 x 10^-6 M_sun/yr, more than an order of magnitude higher than that measured for typical low mass class 0 protostars. The implied accretion luminosity is significantly higher than the observed bolometric luminosity of FIR 4, indicating that the [O I] jet is unlikely to be associated with FIR 4. We argue that the peak line emission seen toward FIR 4 originates in the terminal shock produced by the jet driven by FIR 3. The higher mass-loss rate that we find for FIR 3 is consistent with the idea that intermediate mass protostars drive more powerful jets than their low-mass counterparts. Our results also call into question the nature of FIR 4.
  • We investigate the evolution of far-IR CO emission from protostars observed with Herschel/PACS for 50 sources from the combined sample of HOPS and DIGIT Herschel key programs. From the uniformly sampled spectral energy distributions, we computed $L_{\rm{bol}}$, $T_{\rm{bol}}$ and $L_{\rm {bol}}/L_{\rm {smm}}$ for these sources to search for correlations between far-IR CO emission and protostellar properties. We find a strong and tight correlation between far-IR CO luminosity ($L^{\rm fir}_{\rm CO}$) and the bolometric luminosity ($L_{\rm{bol}}$) of the protostars with $L^{\rm fir}_{\rm CO}$ $\propto$ $L_{\rm{bol}}^{0.7}$. We, however, do not find a strong correlation between $L^{\rm fir}_{\rm CO}$ and protostellar evolutionary indicators, $T_{\rm{bol}}$ and $L_{\rm {bol}}/L_{\rm {smm}}$. FIR CO emission from protostars traces the currently shocked gas by jets/outflows, and $L^{\rm fir}_{\rm CO}$ is proportional to the instantaneous mass loss rate, $\dot{M}_{\rm{out}}$. The correlation between $L^{\rm fir}_{\rm CO}$ and $L_{\rm{bol}}$ is indicative of instantaneous $\dot{M}_{\rm{out}}$ tracking instantaneous $\dot{M}_{\rm{acc}}$. The lack of correlation between $L^{\rm fir}_{\rm CO}$ and evolutionary indicators $T_{\rm{bol}}$ and $L_{\rm {bol}}/L_{\rm {smm}}$ suggests that $\dot{M}_{\rm{out}}$ and, therefore, $\dot{M}_{\rm{acc}}$ do not show any clear evolutionary trend. These results are consistent with mass accretion/ejection in protostars being episodic. Taken together with the previous finding that the time-averaged mass ejection/accretion rate declines during the protostellar phase (e.g., Bontemps et al. 1996), our results suggest that the instantaneous accretion/ejection rate of protostars is highly time variable and episodic, but the amplitude and/or frequency of this variability decreases with time such that the time averaged accretion/ejection rate declines with system age.
  • We present key results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS): spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and model fits of 330 young stellar objects, predominantly protostars, in the Orion molecular clouds. This is the largest sample of protostars studied in a single, nearby star-formation complex. With near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and sub-millimeter photometry from APEX, our SEDs cover 1.2-870 $\mu$m and sample the peak of the protostellar envelope emission at ~100 $\mu$m. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, we classify our sample into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. We implement a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30400 model SEDs and use it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar. We argue that far-IR data are essential for accurate constraints on protostellar envelope properties. We find that most protostars, and in particular the flat-spectrum sources, are well-fit. The median envelope density and median inclination angle decrease from Class 0 to Class I to flat-spectrum protostars, despite the broad range in best-fit parameters in each of the three categories. We also discuss degeneracies in our model parameters. Our results confirm that the different protostellar classes generally correspond to an evolutionary sequence with a decreasing envelope infall rate, but the inclination angle also plays a role in the appearance, and thus interpretation, of the SEDs.
  • We present new measurements of the dust emissivity index, beta, for the high-mass, star-forming OMC 2/3 filament. We combine 160-500 um data from Herschel with long-wavelength observations at 2 mm and fit the spectral energy distributions across a ~ 2 pc long, continuous section of OMC 2/3 at 15000 AU (0.08 pc) resolution. With these data, we measure beta and reconstruct simultaneously the filtered-out large-scale emission at 2 mm. We implement both variable and fixed values of beta, finding that beta = 1.7 - 1.8 provides the best fit across most of OMC 2/3. These beta values are consistent with a similar analysis carried out with filtered Herschel data. Thus, we show that beta values derived from spatial filtered emission maps agree well with those values from unfiltered data at the same resolution. Our results contradict the very low beta values (~ 0.9) previously measured in OMC 2/3 between 1.2 mm and 3.3 mm data, which we attribute to elevated fluxes in the 3.3 mm observations. Therefore, we find no evidence or rapid, extensive dust grain growth in OMC 2/3. Future studies with Herschel data and complementary ground-based long-wavelength data can apply our technique to obtain robust determinations of beta in nearby cold molecular clouds.
  • The dust extinction curve is a critical component of many observational programs and an important diagnostic of the physics of the interstellar medium. Here we present new measurements of the dust extinction curve and its variation towards tens of thousands of stars, a hundred-fold larger sample than in existing detailed studies. We use data from the APOGEE spectroscopic survey in combination with ten-band photometry from Pan-STARRS1, 2MASS, and WISE. We find that the extinction curve in the optical through infrared is well characterized by a one-parameter family of curves described by R(V). The extinction curve is more uniform than suggested in past works, with sigma(R(V)) = 0.18, and with less than one percent of sight lines having R(V) > 4. Our data and analysis have revealed two new aspects of Galactic extinction: first, we find significant, wide-area variations in R(V) throughout the Galactic plane. These variations are on scales much larger than individual molecular clouds, indicating that R(V) variations must trace much more than just grain growth in dense molecular environments. Indeed, we find no correlation between R(V) and dust column density up to E(B-V) ~ 2. Second, we discover a strong relationship between R(V) and the far-infrared dust emissivity.
  • We compare the structure of star-forming molecular clouds in different regions of Orion A to determine how the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF) varies with environmental conditions such as the fraction of young protostars. A correlation between the N-PDF slope and Class 0 protostar fraction has been previously observed in a low-mass star-formation region (Perseus) by Sadavoy; here we test if a similar correlation is observed in a high-mass star-forming region. We use Herschel data to derive a column density map of Orion A. We use the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey catalog for accurate identification and classification of the Orion A young stellar object (YSO) content, including the short-lived Class 0 protostars (with a $\sim$ 0.14 Myr lifetime). We divide Orion A into eight independent 13.5 pc$^2$ regions; in each region we fit the N-PDF distribution with a power-law, and we measure the fraction of Class 0 protostars. We use a maximum likelihood method to measure the N-PDF power-law index without binning. We find that the Class 0 fraction is higher in regions with flatter column density distributions. We test the effects of incompleteness, YSO misclassification, resolution, and pixel-scale. We show that these effects cannot account for the observed trend. Our observations demonstrate an association between the slope of the power-law N-PDF and the Class 0 fractions within Orion A. Various interpretations are discussed including timescales based on the Class 0 protostar fraction assuming a constant star-formation rate. The observed relation suggests that the N-PDF can be related to an "evolutionary state" of the gas. If universal, such a relation permits an evaluation of the evolutionary state from the N-PDF power-law index at much greater distances than those accesible with protostar counts. (abridged)
  • Context: The initial conditions for the gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores and the subsequent birth of stars are still not well constrained. The characteristic cold temperatures (about 10 K) in such regions require observations at sub-millimetre and longer wavelengths. The Herschel Space Observatory and complementary ground-based observations presented in this paper have the unprecedented potential to reveal the structure and kinematics of a prototypical core region at the onset of stellar birth. Aims: This paper aims to determine the density, temperature, and velocity structure of the star-forming Bok globule CB 17. This isolated region is known to host (at least) two sources at different evolutionary stages: a dense core, SMM1, and a Class I protostar, IRS. Methods: We modeled the cold dust emission maps from 100 micron to 1.2 mm with both a modified blackbody technique to determine the optical depth-weighted line-of-sight temperature and column density and a ray-tracing technique to determine the core temperature and volume density structure. Furthermore, we analysed the kinematics of CB17 using the high-density gas tracer N2H+. Results: From the ray-tracing analysis, we find a temperature in the centre of SMM1 of 10.6 K, a flat density profile with radius 9500 au, and a central volume density of n(H) = 2.3x10^5 cm-3. The velocity structure of the N2H+ observations reveal global rotation with a velocity gradient of 4.3 km/s/pc. Superposed on this rotation signature we find a more complex velocity field, which may be indicative of differential motions within the dense core. Conclusions: SMM is a core in an early evolutionary stage at the verge of being bound, but the question of whether it is a starless or a protostellar core remains unanswered.
  • We use mid-infrared to submillimeter data from the Spitzer, Herschel, and APEX telescopes to study the bright sub-mm source OMC-2 FIR 4. We find a point source at 8, 24, and 70 $\mu$m, and a compact, but extended source at 160, 350, and 870 $\mu$m. The peak of the emission from 8 to 70 $\mu$m, attributed to the protostar associated with FIR 4, is displaced relative to the peak of the extended emission; the latter represents the large molecular core the protostar is embedded within. We determine that the protostar has a bolometric luminosity of 37 Lsun, although including more extended emission surrounding the point source raises this value to 86 Lsun. Radiative transfer models of the protostellar system fit the observed SED well and yield a total luminosity of most likely less than 100 Lsun. Our models suggest that the bolometric luminosity of the protostar could be just 12-14 Lsun, while the luminosity of the colder (~ 20 K) extended core could be around 100 Lsun, with a mass of about 27 Msun. Our derived luminosities for the protostar OMC-2 FIR 4 are in direct contradiction with previous claims of a total luminosity of 1000 Lsun (Crimier et al 2009). Furthermore, we find evidence from far-infrared molecular spectra (Kama et al. 2013, Manoj et al. 2013) and 3.6 cm emission (Reipurth et al 1999) that FIR 4 drives an outflow. The final stellar mass the protostar will ultimately achieve is uncertain due to its association with the large reservoir of mass found in the cold core.
  • Seven isolated, nearby low-mass starless molecular cloud cores have been observed as part of the Herschel key program Earliest Phases of Star formation (EPoS). By applying a ray-tracing technique to the obtained continuum emission and complementary (sub)mm emission maps, we derive the physical structure (density, dust temperature) of these cloud cores. We present observations of the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (2-1) and N2H+ (1-0) transitions towards the same cores. Based on the density and temperature profiles, we apply time-dependent chemical and line-radiative transfer modeling and compare the modeled to the observed molecular emission profiles. CO is frozen onto the grains in the center of all cores in our sample. The level of CO depletion increases with hydrogen density and ranges from 46% up to more than 95% in the core centers in the core centers in the three cores with the highest hydrogen density. The average hydrogen density at which 50% of CO is frozen onto the grains is 1.1+-0.4 10^5 cm^-3. At about this density, the cores typically have the highest relative abundance of N2H+. The cores with higher central densities show depletion of N2H+ at levels of 13% to 55%. The chemical ages for the individual species are on average 2+-1 10^5 yr for 13CO, 6+-3 10^4 yr for C18O, and 9+-2 10^4 yr for N2H+. Chemical modeling indirectly suggests that the gas and dust temperatures decouple in the envelopes and that the dust grains are not yet significantly coagulated. We observationally confirm chemical models of CO-freezeout and nitrogen chemistry. We find clear correlations between the hydrogen density and CO depletion and the emergence of N2H+. The chemical ages indicate a core lifetime of less than 1 Myr.
  • The temperature and density structure of molecular cloud cores are the most important physical quantities that determine the course of the protostellar collapse and the properties of the stars they form. Nevertheless, density profiles often rely either on the simplifying assumption of isothermality or on observationally poorly constrained model temperature profiles. With the aim of better constraining the initial physical conditions in molecular cloud cores at the onset of protostellar collapse, we initiated the Guaranteed Time Key Project (GTKP) "The Earliest Phases of Star Formation" (EPoS) with the Herschel satellite. This paper gives an overview of the low-mass sources in the EPoS project, including all observations, the analysis method, and the initial results of the survey. We study the thermal dust emission of 12 previously well-characterized, isolated, nearby globules using FIR and submm continuum maps at up to eight wavelengths between 100 micron and 1.2 mm. Our sample contains both globules with starless cores and embedded protostars at different early evolutionary stages. The dust emission maps are used to extract spatially resolved SEDs, which are then fit independently with modified blackbody curves to obtain line-of-sight-averaged dust temperature and column density maps. We find that the thermal structure of all globules is dominated by external heating from the interstellar radiation field and moderate shielding by thin extended halos. All globules have warm outer envelopes (14-20 K) and colder dense interiors (8-12 K). The protostars embedded in some of the globules raise the local temperature of the dense cores only within radii out to about 5000 AU, but do not significantly affect the overall thermal balance of the globules.
  • We present far-IR (57-196 mu) spectra of 21 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds, obtained with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) onboard the Herschel Space observatory, as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) program. We analyzed the CO emission lines (J_up = 14-46) in the PACS spectra, extracted within a projected distance of <= 2000 AU centered on the protostar. The total luminosity of the CO lines observed with PACS (L(CO)) is found to increase with increasing L_bol. The CO rotational temperature implied by the line ratios increases with J, and at least 3-4 rotational temperature components are required to fit the observed rotational diagram. The rotational temperature components are remarkably invariant between protostars and show no dependence on L_bol, T_bol or envelope density, implying that if the emitting gas is in LTE, the CO emission must arise in multiple temperature components that remain independent of L_bol over two orders of magnitudes. The observed CO emission can also be modeled as arising from a single temperature gas component or from a medium with a power-law temperature distribution; both of these require sub-thermally excited molecular gas at low densities (n(H_2) <= 10^6 cm^-3) and high temperatures (T >= 2000 K). Our results suggest that the contribution from PDRs along the envelope cavity walls is unlikely to be the dominant component of the CO emission observed with PACS. Instead, the "universality" of the rotational temperatures and the observed correlation between L(CO) and L_bol can most easily be explained if the observed CO emission originates in shock-heated, hot (T >= 2000 K), sub-thermally excited (n(H_2) <= 10^6 cm^-3) molecular gas. Post-shock gas at these densities is more likely to be found within the outflow cavities along the molecular outflow or along the cavity walls at radii >= several 100-1000 AU.
  • (Abriged) In the framework of the Herschel GTKP "The earliest phases of star formation", we have imaged B68 between 100 and 500 um. Ancillary (sub)mm data, spectral line maps of the 12/13CO(2-1) transitions as well as a NIR extinction map were added to the analysis. We employed a ray-tracing algorithm to derive the 2D mid-plane dust temperature and volume density distribution without suffering from LoS averaging effects of simple SED fitting procedures. Additional 3D radiative transfer calculations were employed to investigate the connection between the external irradiation and the peculiar crescent shaped morphology found in the FIR maps. For the first time, we spatially resolve the dust temperature and density distribution of B68. We find T_dust dropping from 16.7 K at the edge to 8.2 K in the centre, which is about 4 K lower than the result of the simple SED fitting approach. N_H peaks at 4.3x10^22 cm^-2 and n_H at 3.4x10^5 cm^-3 in the centre. B68 has a mass of 3.1 M_sun of material with A_K > 0.2 mag for an assumed distance of 150 pc. We detect a compact source in the southeastern trunk, which is also seen in extinction and CO. We find the radial density distribution from the edge of the inner plateau outward to be n_H ~ r^-3.5. Such a steep profile can arise from either or both of the following: external irradiation with a significant UV contribution or the fragmentation of filamentary structures. Our 3D radiative transfer model of an externally irradiated core by an anisotropic ISRF reproduces the crescent morphology. Our CO observations show that B68 is part of a chain of globules in both space and velocity, which may indicate that it was once part of a filament which dispersed. We also resolve a new compact source in the SE trunk and find that it is slightly shifted in centroid velocity from B68, lending qualitative support to core collision scenarios.
  • We present 70 and 160 micron Herschel science demonstration images of a field in the Orion A molecular cloud that contains the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, obtained with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). These observations demonstrate Herschel's unprecedented ability to study the rich population of protostars in the Orion molecular clouds at the wavelengths where they emit most of their luminosity. The four protostars previously identified by Spitzer 3.6-40 micron imaging and spectroscopy are detected in the 70 micron band, and three are clearly detected at 160 microns. We measure photometry of the protostars in the PACS bands and assemble their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 1 to 870 microns with these data, Spitzer spectra and photometry, 2MASS data, and APEX sub-mm data. The SEDs are fit to models generated with radiative transfer codes. From these fits we can constrain the fundamental properties of the protostars. We find luminosities in the range 12-84 L_sun and envelope densities spanning over two orders of magnitude. This implies that the four protostars have a wide range of envelope infall rates and evolutionary states: two have dense, infalling envelopes, while the other two have only residual envelopes. We also show the highly irregular and filamentary structure of the cold dust and gas surrounding the protostars as traced at 160 microns.
  • The NGC 1999 reflection nebula features a dark patch with a size of ~10,000 AU, which has been interpreted as a small, dense foreground globule and possible site of imminent star formation. We present Herschel PACS far-infrared 70 and 160mum maps, which reveal a flux deficit at the location of the globule. We estimate the globule mass needed to produce such an absorption feature to be a few tenths to a few Msun. Inspired by this Herschel observation, we obtained APEX LABOCA and SABOCA submillimeter continuum maps, and Magellan PANIC near-infrared images of the region. We do not detect a submillimer source at the location of the Herschel flux decrement; furthermore our observations place an upper limit on the mass of the globule of ~2.4x10^-2 Msun. Indeed, the submillimeter maps appear to show a flux depression as well. Furthermore, the near-infrared images detect faint background stars that are less affected by extinction inside the dark patch than in its surroundings. We suggest that the dark patch is in fact a hole or cavity in the material producing the NGC 1999 reflection nebula, excavated by protostellar jets from the V 380 Ori multiple system.