• We describe an implementation of a particle physics module available for the PLUTO code, appropriate for the dynamical evolution of a plasma consisting of a thermal fluid and a non-thermal component represented by relativistic charged particles, or cosmic rays (CR). While the fluid is approached using standard numerical schemes for magnetohydrodynamics, CR particles are treated kinetically using conventional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) techniques. The module can be used to describe either test particles motion in the fluid electromagnetic field or to solve the fully coupled MHD-PIC system of equations with particle backreaction on the fluid as originally introduced by \cite{Bai_etal.2015}. Particle backreaction on the fluid is included in the form of momentum-energy feedback and by introducing the CR-induced Hall term in Ohm's law. The hybrid MHD-PIC module can be employed to study CR kinetic effects on scales larger than the (ion) skin depth provided the Larmor gyration scale is properly resolved. When applicable, this formulation avoids to resolve microscopic scales offering a substantial computational saving with respect to PIC simulations. We present a fully-conservative formulation which is second-order accurate in time and space and extends to either Runge-Kutta (RK) or corner-transport-upwind (CTU) time-stepping schemes (for the fluid) while a standard Boris integrator is employed for the particles. For highly-energetic relativistic CRs and in order to overcome the time step restriction a novel sub-cycling strategy that retains second-order accuracy in time is presented. Numerical benchmarks and applications including Bell instability, diffusive shock acceleration and test particle acceleration in reconnecting layers are discussed.
  • We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by Magneto-Rotational Turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge -- the winding gauge -- that provides a natural interpretation in terms of average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases, that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.
  • We investigate numerically Alfv\'en waves propagating along an axisymmetric and non-isothermal solar flux tube embedded in the solar atmosphere. The tube magnetic field is current-free and diverges with height, and the waves are excited by a periodic driver along the tube magnetic field lines. The main results are that the two wave variables, the velocity and magnetic field perturbations in the azimuthal direction, behave differently as a result of gradients of physical parameters along the tube. To explain these differences in the wave behavior, the time evolution of the wave variables and the resulting cutoff period for each wave variable are calculated, and used to determine regions in the solar chromosphere where strong wave reflection may occur.
  • In the last decade, the relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of pulsar wind nebulae, and of the Crab nebula in particular, has been highly successful, with many of the observed dynamical and emission properties reproduced down to the finest detail. Here, we critically discuss the results of some of the most recent studies: namely the investigation of the origin of the radio emitting particles and the quest for the acceleration sites of particles of different energies along the termination shock, by using wisps motion as a diagnostic tool; the study of the magnetic dissipation process in high magnetization nebulae by means of new long-term three-dimensional simulations of the pulsar wind nebula evolution; the investigation of the relativistic tearing instability in thinning current sheets, leading to fast reconnection events that might be at the origin of the Crab nebula gamma-ray flares.
  • Extragalactic radio sources have been classified into two classes, Fanaroff-Riley I and II, which differ in morphology and radio power. Strongly emitting sources belong to the edge-brightened FR II class, and weakly emitting sources to the edge-darkened FR I class. The origin of this dichotomy is not yet fully understood. Numerical simulations are successful in generating FR II morphologies, but they fail to reproduce the diffuse structure of FR Is. By means of hydro-dynamical 3D simulations of supersonic jets, we investigate how the displayed morphologies depend on the jet parameters. Bow shocks and Mach disks at the jet head, which are probably responsible for the hot spots in the FR II sources, disappear for a jet kinetic power L_kin < 10^43 erg/s. This threshold compares favorably with the luminosity at which the FR I/FR II transition is observed. The problem is addressed by numerical means carrying out 3D HD simulations of supersonic jets that propagate in a non-homogeneous medium with the ambient temperature that increases with distance from the jet origin, which maintains constant pressure. The jet energy in the lower power sources, instead of being deposited at the terminal shock, is gradually dissipated by the turbulence. The jets spread out while propagating, and they smoothly decelerate while mixing with the ambient medium and produce the plumes characteristic of FR I objects. Three-dimensionality is an essential ingredient to explore the FR I evolution because the properties of turbulence in two and three dimensions are very different, since there is no energy cascade to small scales in two dimensions, and two-dimensional simulations with the same parameters lead to FRII-like behavior.
  • A significant fraction of OB-type, main-sequence massive stars are classified as runaway and move supersonically through the interstellar medium (ISM). Their strong stellar winds interact with their surroundings where the typical strength of the local ISM magnetic field is about 3.5-7 micro-G, which can result in the formation of bow shock nebulae. We investigate the effects of such magnetic fields, aligned with the motion of the flow, on the formation and emission properties of these circumstellar structures. Our axisymmetric, magneto-hydrodynamical simulations with optically-thin radiative cooling, heating and anisotropic thermal conduction show that the presence of the background ISM magnetic field affects the projected optical emission our bow shocks at Ha and [OIII] lambda 5007 which become fainter by about 1-2 orders of magnitude, respectively. Radiative transfer calculations against dust opacity indicate that the magnetic field slightly diminishes their projected infrared emission and that our bow shocks emit brightly at 60 micron. This may explain why the bow shocks generated by ionizing runaway massive stars are often difficult to identify. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of the bow shock of Zeta Ophiuchi and we support the interpretation of its imperfect morphology as an evidence of the presence of an ISM magnetic field not aligned with the motion of its driving star.
  • We perform MHD modeling of a single bright coronal loop to include the interaction with a non-uniform magnetic field. The field is stressed by random footpoint rotation in the central region and its energy is dissipated into heating by growing currents through anomalous magnetic diffusivity that switches on in the corona above a current density threshold. We model an entire single magnetic flux tube, in the solar atmosphere extending from the high-beta chromosphere to the low-beta corona through the steep transition region. The magnetic field expands from the chromosphere to the corona. The maximum resolution is ~30 km. We obtain an overall evolution typical of loop models and realistic loop emission in the EUV and X-ray bands. The plasma confined in the flux tube is heated to active region temperatures (~3 MK) after ~2/3 hr. Upflows from the chromosphere up to ~100 km/s fill the core of the flux tube to densities above 10^9 cm^-3. More heating is released in the low corona than the high corona and is finely structured both in space and time.
  • We perform a linear stability analysis of magnetized rotating cylindrical jet flows in the approximation of zero thermal pressure. We focus our analysis on the effect of rotation on the current driven mode and on the unstable modes introduced by rotation. We find that rotation has a stabilizing effect on the current driven mode only for rotation velocities of the order of the Alfv\'en velocity. Rotation introduces also a new unstable centrifugal buoyancy mode and the "cold" magnetorotational instability. The first mode is analogous to the Parker instability with the centrifugal force playing the role of effective gravity. The magnetorotational instability can be present, but only in a very limited region of the parameter space and is never dominant. The current driven mode is characterized by large wavelenghts and is dominant at small values of the rotational velocity, while the buoyancy mode becomes dominant as rotation is increased and is characterized by small wavelenghts.
  • We present an approach to deriving global properties of accretion disks from the knowledge of local solutions derived from numerical simulations based on the shearing box approximation. The approach consists of a two-step procedure. First a local solution valid for all values of the disk height is constructed by piecing together an interior solution obtained numerically with an analytical exterior radiative solution. The matching is obtained by assuming hydrostatic balance and radiative equilibrium. Although in principle the procedure can be carried out in general, it simplifies considerably when the interior solution is fully convective. In these cases, the construction is analogous to the derivation of the Hayashi tracks for protostars. The second step consists of piecing together the local solutions at different radii to obtain a global solution. Here we use the symmetry of the solutions with respect to the defining dimensionless numbers--in a way similar to the use of homology relations in stellar structure theory--to obtain the scaling properties of the various disk quantities with radius.
  • An Equation of State (\textit{EoS}) closes the set of fluid equations. Although an ideal EoS with a constant \textit{adiabatic index} $\Gamma$ is the preferred choice due to its simplistic implementation, many astrophysical fluid simulations may benefit from a more sophisticated treatment that can account for diverse chemical processes. Here, we first review the basic thermodynamic principles of a gas mixture in terms of its thermal and caloric EoS by including effects like ionization, dissociation as well as temperature dependent degrees of freedom such as molecular vibrations and rotations. The formulation is revisited in the context of plasmas that are either in equilibrium conditions (local thermodynamic- or collisional excitation- equilibria) or described by non-equilibrium chemistry coupled to optically thin radiative cooling. We then present a numerical implementation of thermally ideal gases obeying a more general caloric EoS with non-constant adiabatic index in Godunov-type numerical schemes.We discuss the necessary modifications to the Riemann solver and to the conversion between total energy and pressure (or vice-versa) routinely invoked in Godunov-type schemes. We then present two different approaches for computing the EoS.The first one employs root-finder methods and it is best suited for EoS in analytical form. The second one leans on lookup table and interpolation and results in a more computationally efficient approach although care must be taken to ensure thermodynamic consistency. A number of selected benchmarks demonstrate that the employment of a non-ideal EoS can lead to important differences in the solution when the temperature range is $500-10^4$ K where dissociation and ionization occur. The implementation of selected EoS introduces additional computational costs although using lookup table methods can significantly reduce the overhead by a factor $3\sim 4$.
  • We present an interface between the (magneto-) hydrodynamics code PLUTO and the plasma simulation and spectral synthesis code CLOUDY. By combining these codes, we constructed a new photoionization hydrodynamics solver: The PLUTO-CLOUDY Interface (TPCI), which is well suited to simulate photoevaporative flows under strong irradiation. The code includes the electromagnetic spectrum from X-rays to the radio range and solves the photoionization and chemical network of the 30 lightest elements. TPCI follows an iterative numerical scheme: First, the equilibrium state of the medium is solved for a given radiation field by CLOUDY, resulting in a net radiative heating or cooling. In the second step, the latter influences the (magneto-) hydrodynamic evolution calculated by PLUTO. Here, we validated the one-dimensional version of the code on the basis of four test problems: Photoevaporation of a cool hydrogen cloud, cooling of coronal plasma, formation of a Stroemgren sphere, and the evaporating atmosphere of a hot Jupiter. This combination of an equilibrium photoionization solver with a general MHD code provides an advanced simulation tool applicable to a variety of astrophysical problems.
  • At least 5 per cent of the massive stars are moving supersonically through the interstellar medium (ISM) and are expected to produce a stellar wind bow shock. We explore how the mass loss and space velocity of massive runaway stars affect the morphology of their bow shocks. We run two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations following the evolution of the circumstellar medium of these stars in the Galactic plane from the main sequence to the red supergiant phase. We find that thermal conduction is an important process governing the shape, size and structure of the bow shocks around hot stars, and that they have an optical luminosity mainly produced by forbidden lines, e.g. [OIII]. The Ha emission of the bow shocks around hot stars originates from near their contact discontinuity. The H$\alpha$ emission of bow shocks around cool stars originates from their forward shock, and is too faint to be observed for the bow shocks that we simulate. The emission of optically-thin radiation mainly comes from the shocked ISM material. All bow shock models are brighter in the infrared, i.e. the infrared is the most appropriate waveband to search for bow shocks. Our study suggests that the infrared emission comes from near the contact discontinuity for bow shocks of hot stars and from the inner region of shocked wind for bow shocks around cool stars. We predict that, in the Galactic plane, the brightest, i.e. the most easily detectable bow shocks are produced by high-mass stars moving with small space velocities.
  • We investigate the linear and nonlinear evolution of current-carrying jets in a periodic configuration by means of high resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations. The jets under consideration are strongly magnetized with a variable pitch profile and initially in equilibrium under the action of a force-free magnetic field. The growth of current-driven (CDI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KHI) instabilities is quantified using three selected cases corresponding to static, Alfvenic and super-Alfvenic jets. During the early stages, we observe large-scale helical deformations of the jet corresponding to the growth of the initially excited CDI mode. A direct comparison between our simulation results and the analytical growth rates obtained from linear theory reveals good agreement on condition that high-resolution and accurate discretization algorithms are employed. After the initial linear phase, the jet structure is significantly altered and, while slowly-moving jets show increasing helical deformations, larger velocity shear are violently disrupted on a few Alfven crossing time leaving a turbulent flow structure. Overall, kinetic and magnetic energies are quickly dissipated into heat and during the saturated regime the jet momentum is redistributed on a larger surface area with most of the jet mass travelling at smaller velocities. The effectiveness of this process is regulated by the onset of KHI instabilities taking place at the jet/ambient interface and can be held responsible for vigorous jet braking and entrainment.
  • We consider the problem of convergence in stratified isothermal shearing boxes with zero net magnetic flux. We present results with the highest resolution to-date--up to 200 grid-point per pressure scale height--that show no clear evidence of convergence. Rather, the Maxwell stresses continue to decrease with increasing resolution. We propose some possible scenarios to explain the lack of convergence based on multi-layer dynamo systems.
  • High-order reconstruction schemes for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are revised in the finite volume approach. The formulation employs a piecewise polynomial approximation to the zone-average values to reconstruct left and right interface states from within a computational zone to arbitrary order of accuracy by inverting a Vandermonde-like linear system of equations with spatially varying coefficients. The approach is general and can be used on uniform and non-uniform meshes although explicit expressions are derived for polynomials from second to fifth degree in cylindrical and spherical geometries with uniform grid spacing. It is shown that, in regions of large curvature, the resulting expressions differ considerably from their Cartesian counterparts and that the lack of such corrections can severely degrade the accuracy of the solution close to the coordinate origin. Limiting techniques and monotonicity constraints are revised for conventional reconstruction schemes, namely, the piecewise linear method (PLM), third-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme and the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). The performance of the improved reconstruction schemes is investigated in a number of selected numerical benchmarks involving the solution of both scalar and systems of nonlinear equations (such as the equations of gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics) in cylindrical and spherical geometries in one and two dimensions. Results confirm that the proposed approach yields considerably smaller errors, higher convergence rates and it avoid spurious numerical effects at a symmetry axis.
  • The expansion of coronal loops in the transition region may considerably influence the diagnostics of the plasma emission measure. The cross sectional area of the loops is expected to depend on the temperature and pressure, and might be sensitive to the heating rate. The approach here is to study the area response to slow changes in the coronal heating rate, and check the current interpretation in terms of steady heating models. We study the area response with a time-dependent 2D MHD loop model, including the description of the expanding magnetic field, coronal heating and losses by thermal conduction and radiation from optically thin plasma. We run a simulation for a loop 50 Mm long and quasi-statically heated to about 4 MK. We find that the area can change substantially with the quasi-steady heating rate, e.g. by ~40% at 0.5 MK as the loop temperature varies between 1 and 4 MK, and, therefore, affects the interpretation of DEM(T) curves.
  • According to the magnetospheric accretion scenario, young low-mass stars are surrounded by circumstellar disks which they interact with through accretion of mass. The accretion builds up the star to its final mass and is also believed to power the mass outflows, which may in turn have a significant role in removing the excess angular momentum from the star-disk system. Although the process of mass accretion is a critical aspect of star formation, some of its mechanisms are still to be fully understood. On the other hand, strong flaring activity is a common feature of young stellar objects (YSOs). In the Sun, such events give rise to perturbations of the interplanetary medium. Similar but more energetic phenomena occur in YSOs and may influence the circumstellar environment. In fact, a recent study has shown that an intense flaring activity close to the disk may strongly perturb the stability of circumstellar disks, thus inducing mass accretion episodes (Orlando et al. 2011). Here we review the main results obtained in the field and the future perspectives.
  • Astronomical observations, analytical solutions and numerical simulations have provided the building blocks to formulate the current theory of young stellar object jets. Although each approach has made great progress independently, it is only during the last decade that significant efforts are being made to bring the separate pieces together. Building on previous work that combined analytical solutions and numerical simulations, we apply a sophisticated cooling function to incorporate optically thin energy losses in the dynamics. On the one hand, this allows a self-consistent treatment of the jet evolution and on the other, it provides the necessary data to generate synthetic emission maps. Firstly, analytical disk and stellar outflow solutions are properly combined to initialize numerical two-component jet models inside the computational box. Secondly, magneto-hydrodynamical simulations are performed in 2.5D, following properly the ionization and recombination of a maximum of $29$ ions. Finally, the outputs are post-processed to produce artificial observational data. The first two-component jet simulations, based on analytical models, that include ionization and optically thin radiation losses demonstrate promising results for modeling specific young stellar object outflows. The generation of synthetic emission maps provides the link to observations, as well as the necessary feedback for the further improvement of the available models.
  • We investigate the dynamical propagation of the South-East jet from the Crab pulsar interacting with supernova ejecta by means of three-dimensional relativistic MHD numerical simulations with the PLUTO code. The initial jet structure is set up from the inner regions of the Crab Nebula. We study the evolution of hot, relativistic hollow outflows initially carrying a purely azimuthal magnetic field. Our jet models are characterized by different choices of the outflow magnetization ($\sigma$ parameter) and the bulk Lorentz factor ($\gamma_{j}$). We show that the jet is heavily affected by the growth of current-driven kink instabilities causing considerable deflection throughout its propagation length. This behavior is partially stabilized by the combined action of larger flow velocities and/or reduced magnetic field strengths. We find that our best jet models are characterized by relatively large values of $\sigma$ ($\gtrsim 1$) and small values of $\gamma_{j}\simeq 2$. Our results are in good agreement with the recent X-ray (\textit{Chandra}) data of the Crab Nebula South-East jet indicating that the jet changes direction of propagation on a time scale of the order of few years. The 3D models presented here may have important implications in the investigation of particle acceleration in relativistic outflows.
  • We perform a linear analysis of the stability of a magnetized relativistic non-rotating cylindrical flow in the aproximation of zero thermal pressure, considering only the m = 1 mode. We find that there are two modes of instability: Kelvin-Helmholtz and current driven. The Kelvin-Helmholtz mode is found at low magnetizations and its growth rate depends very weakly on the pitch parameter. The current driven modes are found at high magnetizations and the value of the growth rate and the wavenumber of the maximum increase as we decrease the pitch parameter. In the relativistic regime the current driven mode is splitted in two branches, the branch at high wavenumbers is characterized by the eigenfunction concentrated in the jet core, the branch at low wavenumbers is instead characterized by the eigenfunction that extends outside the jet velocity shear region.
  • We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with zero magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite (constant) thermal diffusivity. We choose radiative boundary conditions at the vertical boundaries in which the heat flux is propor- tional to the fourth power of the temperature. We compare the results with the corresponding cases in which fixed temperature boundary conditions are applied. The most notable result is that the formation of a fully convective state in which the density is nearly constant as a function of height and the heat is transported to the upper and lower boundaries by overturning motions is robust and persists even in cases with radiative boundary conditions. Interestingly, in the convective regime, although the diffusive transport is negligible the mean stratification does not relax to an adiabatic state.
  • We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with zero mean magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite (constant) thermal diffusivity. The calculations begin from an isothermal state spanning three scale heights above and below the mid-plane. After a long transient the layers settle to a stationary state in which thermal losses out of the boundaries are balanced by dissipative heating. We identify two regimes. A conductive regime in which the heat is transported mostly by conduction and the density decreases with height. In the limit of large thermal diffusivity this regime resembles the more familiar isothermal case. Another, the convective regime, observed at smaller values of the thermal diffusivity, in which the layer becomes unstable to overturning motions, the heat is carried mostly by advection and the density becomes nearly constant throughout the layer. In this latter constant-density regime we observe evidence for large-scale dynamo action leading to a substantial increase in transport efficiency relative to the conductive cases.
  • It is a well established fact that some YSO jets (e.g. RW Aur) display different propagation speeds between their blue and red shifted parts, a feature possibly associated with the central engine or the environment in which the jet propagates. In order to understand the origin of asymmetric YSO jet velocities, we investigate the efficiency of two candidate mechanisms, one based on the intrinsic properties of the system and one based on the role of the external medium. In particular, a parallel or anti-parallel configuration between the protostellar magnetosphere and the disk magnetic field is considered and the resulting dynamics are examined both in an ideal and a resistive magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) regime. Moreover, we explore the effects of a potential difference in the pressure of the environment, as a consequence of the non-uniform density distribution of molecular clouds. Ideal and resistive axisymmetric numerical simulations are carried out for a variety of models, all of which are based on a combination of two analytical solutions, a disk wind and a stellar outflow. We find that jet velocity asymmetries can indeed occur both when multipolar magnetic moments are present in the star-disk system as well as when non-uniform environments are considered. The latter case is an external mechanism that can easily explain the large time scale of the phenomenon, whereas the former one naturally relates it to the YSO intrinsic properties. [abridged]
  • Explicit numerical computations of super-fast differentially rotating disks are subject to the time-step constraint imposed by the Courant condition. When the bulk orbital velocity largely exceeds any other wave speed the time step is considerably reduced and a large number of steps may be necessary to complete the computation. We present a robust numerical scheme to overcome the Courant limitation by extending the algorithm previously known as FARGO (Fast Advection in Rotating Gaseous Objects) to the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The proposed scheme conserves total angular momentum and energy to machine precision and works in Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. The algorithm is implemented in the PLUTO code for astrophysical gasdynamics and is suitable for local or global simulations of accretion or proto-planetary disk models. By decomposing the total velocity into an average azimuthal contribution and a residual term, the algorithm solves the MHD equations through a linear transport step in the orbital direction and a standard nonlinear solver applied to the MHD equations written in terms of the residual velocity. Since the former step is not subject to any stability restriction, the Courant condition is computed only in terms of the residual velocity, leading to substantially larger time steps. The magnetic field is advanced in time using the constrained transport method in order to preserve the divergence-free condition. Conservation of total energy and angular momentum is enforced at the discrete level by properly expressing the source terms in terms of upwind fluxes available during the standard solver. Our results show that applications of the proposed orbital-advection scheme to problems of astrophysical relevance provides, at reduced numerical cost, equally accurate and less dissipative results than standard time-marching schemes.
  • We present a description of the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) implementation of the PLUTO code for solving the equations of classical and special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD and RMHD). The current release exploits, in addition to the static grid version of the code, the distributed infrastructure of the CHOMBO library for multidimensional parallel computations over block-structured, adaptively refined grids. We employ a conservative finite-volume approach where primary flow quantities are discretized at the cell-center in a dimensionally unsplit fashion using the Corner Transport Upwind (CTU) method. Time stepping relies on a characteristic tracing step where piecewise parabolic method (PPM), weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) or slope-limited linear interpolation schemes can be handily adopted. A characteristic decomposition-free version of the scheme is also illustrated. The solenoidal condition of the magnetic field is enforced by augmenting the equations with a generalized Lagrange multiplier (GLM) providing propagation and damping of divergence errors through a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic explicit cleaning step. Among the novel features, we describe an extension of the scheme to include non-ideal dissipative processes such as viscosity, resistivity and anisotropic thermal conduction without operator splitting. Finally, we illustrate an efficient treatment of point-local, potentially stiff source terms over hierarchical nested grids by taking advantage of the adaptivity in time. Several multidimensional benchmarks and applications to problems of astrophysical relevance assess the potentiality of the AMR version of PLUTO in resolving flow features separated by large spatial and temporal disparities.