• This paper describes the observations and the first data release (DR1) of the ESO public spectroscopic survey "VANDELS, a deep VIMOS survey of the CANDELS CDFS and UDS fields". VANDELS' main targets are star-forming galaxies at 2.4<z<5.5 and massive passive galaxies at 1<z<2.5. By adopting a strategy of ultra-long exposure times, from 20 to 80 hours per source, VANDELS is designed to be the deepest ever spectroscopic survey of the high-redshift Universe. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the VIMOS spectrograph, the survey has obtained ultra-deep spectra covering the wavelength 4800-10000 A with sufficient signal-to-noise to investigate the astrophysics of high-redshift galaxy evolution via detailed absorption line studies. The VANDELS-DR1 is the release of all spectra obtained during the first season of observations and includes data for galaxies for which the total (or half of the total) scheduled integration time was completed. The release contains 879 individual objects with a measured redshift and includes fully wavelength and flux-calibrated 1D spectra, the associated error spectra, sky spectra and wavelength-calibrated 2D spectra. We also provide a catalog with the essential galaxy parameters, including spectroscopic redshifts and redshift quality flags. In this paper we present the survey layout and observations, the data reduction and redshift measurement procedure and the general properties of the VANDELS-DR1 sample. We also discuss the spectroscopic redshift distribution, the accuracy of the photometric redshifts and we provide some examples of data products. All VANDELS-DR1 data are publicly available and can be retrieved from the ESO archive. Two further data releases are foreseen in the next 2 years with a final release scheduled for June 2020 which will include improved re-reduction of the entire spectroscopic data set. (abridged)
  • VANDELS is a uniquely-deep spectroscopic survey of high-redshift galaxies with the VIMOS spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The survey has obtained ultra-deep optical (0.48 < lambda < 1.0 micron) spectroscopy of ~2100 galaxies within the redshift interval 1.0 < z < 7.0, over a total area of ~0.2 sq. degrees centred on the CANDELS UDS and CDFS fields. Based on accurate photometric redshift pre-selection, 85% of the galaxies targeted by VANDELS were selected to be at z>=3. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the refurbished VIMOS spectrograph, the fundamental aim of the survey is to provide the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra necessary to measure key physical properties such as stellar population ages, masses, metallicities and outflow velocities from detailed absorption-line studies. Using integration times calculated to produce an approximately constant signal-to-noise ratio (20 < t_int < 80 hours), the VANDELS survey targeted: a) bright star-forming galaxies at 2.4 < z < 5.5, b) massive quiescent galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.5, c) fainter star-forming galaxies at 3.0 < z < 7.0 and d) X-ray/Spitzer-selected active galactic nuclei and Herschel-detected galaxies. By targeting two extragalactic survey fields with superb multi-wavelength imaging data, VANDELS will produce a unique legacy data set for exploring the physics underpinning high-redshift galaxy evolution. In this paper we provide an overview of the VANDELS survey designed to support the science exploitation of the first ESO public data release, focusing on the scientific motivation, survey design and target selection.
  • We present physical properties [redshifts (z), star-formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar)] of bright (S850>4mJy) submm galaxies in the ~2deg2 COSMOS and UDS fields selected with SCUBA-2/JCMT. We complete the galaxy identification process for all (~2000) S/N>3.5 850-um sources, but focus our scientific analysis on a high-quality sub-sample of 651 S/N>4 sources with complete multi-wavelength coverage including 1.1-mm imaging. We check the reliability of our identifications, and the robustness of the SCUBA-2 fluxes by revisiting the recent ALMA follow-up of 29 sources in our sample. Considering >4mJy ALMA sources, our identification method has a completeness of ~86 per cent with a reliability of ~92 per cent, and only ~15-20 per cent of sources are significantly affected by multiplicity (when a secondary component contributes >1/3 of the primary source flux). The impact of source blending on the 850-um source counts as determined with SCUBA-2 is modest; scaling the single-dish fluxes by ~0.9 reproduces the ALMA source counts. For our final SCUBA-2 sample we find median z=2.40+0.10-0.04, SFR=287+-6Moyr-1, and log(Mstar/Mo)=11.12+-0.02 (the latter for 349/651 sources with optical identifications). These properties clearly locate bright submm galaxies on the high-mass end of the 'main sequence' of star-forming galaxies out to z~6, suggesting that major mergers are not a dominant driver of the high-redshift submm-selected population. Their number densities are also consistent with the evolving galaxy stellar mass function. Hence, the submm galaxy population is as expected, albeit reproducing the evolution of the main sequence of star-forming galaxies remains a challenge for theoretical models/simulations.
  • We present a new exploration of the cosmic star-formation history and dust obscuration in massive galaxies at redshifts $0.5< z<6$. We utilize the deepest 450 and 850$\mu$m imaging from SCUBA-2 CLS, covering 230arcmin$^2$ in the AEGIS, COSMOS and UDS fields, together with 100-250$\mu$m imaging from Herschel. We demonstrate the capability of the T-PHOT deconfusion code to reach below the confusion limit, using multi-wavelength prior catalogues from CANDELS/3D-HST. By combining IR and UV data, we measure the relationship between total star-formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass up to $z\sim5$, indicating that UV-derived dust corrections underestimate the SFR in massive galaxies. We investigate the relationship between obscuration and the UV slope (the IRX-$\beta$ relation) in our sample, which is similar to that of low-redshift starburst galaxies, although it deviates at high stellar masses. Our data provide new measurements of the total SFR density (SFRD) in $M_\ast>10^{10}M_\odot$ galaxies at $0.5<z<6$. This is dominated by obscured star formation by a factor of $>10$. One third of this is accounted for by 450$\mu$m-detected sources, while one fifth is attributed to UV-luminous sources (brighter than $L^\ast_{UV}$), although even these are largely obscured. By extrapolating our results to include all stellar masses, we estimate a total SFRD that is in good agreement with previous results from IR and UV data at $z\lesssim3$, and from UV-only data at $z\sim5$. The cosmic star-formation history undergoes a transition at $z\sim3-4$, as predominantly unobscured growth in the early Universe is overtaken by obscured star formation, driven by the build-up of the most massive galaxies during the peak of cosmic assembly.
  • We investigate the contribution of major mergers (mass ratios $>1:5$) to stellar mass growth and morphological transformations around the epoch of peak cosmic star formation ($z\sim2$). We visually classify a complete sample of massive (M $>$ 10$^{10}$M$_{\odot}$) galaxies at this epoch, drawn from the CANDELS survey, into late-type galaxies, major mergers, spheroids and disturbed spheroids which show morphological disturbances. Given recent simulation work, which indicates that recent ($<$0.3-0.4 Gyr) major-merger remnants exhibit clear tidal features in such images, we use the fraction of disturbed spheroids to probe the role of major mergers in driving morphological transformations. The percentage of blue spheroids (i.e. with ongoing star formation) that show morphological disturbances is only 21 $\pm$ 4%, indicating that major mergers are not the dominant mechanism for spheroid creation at $z\sim2$ - other processes, such as minor mergers or cold accretion are likely to be the main drivers of this process. We also use the rest-frame U-band luminosity as a proxy for star formation to show that only a small fraction of the star formation budget ($\sim$3%) is triggered by major mergers. Taken together, our results show that major mergers are not significant drivers of galaxy evolution at $z\sim2$.
  • We exploit a sample of ultra-faint high-redshift galaxies (demagnified HST $H_{160}$ magnitude $>30$) in the Frontier Fields clusters A2744 and M0416 to constrain a theoretical model for the UV luminosity function (LF) in the presence of photoionization feedback. The objects have been selected on the basis of accurate photometric redshifts computed from multi-band photometry including 7 HST bands and deep $K_s$ and IRAC observations. Magnification is computed on an object-by-object basis from all available lensing models of the two clusters. We take into account source detection completeness as a function of luminosity and size, magnification effects and systematics in the lens modeling of the clusters under investigation. We find that our sample of high-$z$ galaxies constrain the cut-off halo circular velocity below which star-formation is suppressed by photo-ionization feedback to $v_c^{\rm cut} < 50$ km s$^{-1}$. This circular velocity corresponds to a halo mass of $\approx5.6\times10^9~M_\odot$ and $\approx2.3\times10^9~M_\odot$ at $z=5$ and 10 respectively: higher mass halos can thus sustain continuous star formation activity without being quenched by external ionizing flux. More stringent constraints are prevented by the uncertainty in the modeling of the cluster lens, as embodied by systematic differences among the lens models available.
  • We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest-frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. We exploit a multi-wavelength catalogue ranging from HST to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multi-band information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State of the art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. We show that photometric redshifts reach a remarkable ~3-5% accuracy. After accounting for magnification the H band number counts are found in agreement at bright magnitudes with number counts from the CANDELS fields, while extending the presently available samples to galaxies intrinsically as faint as H160~32-33 thanks to strong gravitational lensing. The Frontier Fields allow to probe the galaxy stellar mass distribution at 0.5-1.5 dex lower masses, depending on magnification, with respect to extragalactic wide fields, including sources at Mstar~ 10^7-10^8 Msun at z>5. Similarly, they allow the detection of objects with intrinsic SFRs>1dex lower than in the CANDELS fields reaching 0.1-1 Msun/yr at z~6-10. [abridged]
  • We present the results from a study of the morphologies of moderate luminosity X-ray selected AGN host galaxies in comparison to a carefully mass-matched control sample at 0.5 < z < 3 in the CANDELS GOODS-S field. We apply a multi-wavelength morphological decomposition analysis to these two samples and report on the differences between the morphologies as fitted from single Sersic and multiple Sersic models, and models which include an additional nuclear point-source component. Thus, we are able to compare the widely adopted single Sersic fits from previous studies to the results from a full morphological decomposition, and address the issue of how biased the inferred properties of AGN hosts are by a potential nuclear contribution from the AGN itself. We find that the AGN hosts are mixed systems which have higher bulge fractions than the control sample in our highest redshift bins at the >99.7% confidence level, according to all model fits even those which adopt a point-source component. This serves to alleviate concerns that previous, purely single Sersic, analyses of AGN hosts could have been spuriously biased towards higher bulge fractions. This dataset allows us to further probe the physical nature of these point-source components; we find no strong correlation between the point-source component and AGN activity, and that these point-source components are best modelled physically by nuclear starbursts. Our analysis of the bulge and disk fractions of these AGN hosts in comparison to a mass-matched control sample reveals a similar morphological evolutionary track for both the active and non-active populations, providing further evidence in favour of a model where AGN activity is triggered by secular processes.
  • We present the public release of the stellar mass catalogs for the GOODS-S and UDS fields obtained using some of the deepest near-IR images available, achieved as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) project. We combine the effort from ten different teams, who computed the stellar masses using the same photometry and the same redshifts. Each team adopted their preferred fitting code, assumptions, priors, and parameter grid. The combination of results using the same underlying stellar isochrones reduces the systematics associated with the fitting code and other choices. Thanks to the availability of different estimates, we can test the effect of some specific parameters and assumptions on the stellar mass estimate. The choice of the stellar isochrone library turns out to have the largest effect on the galaxy stellar mass estimates, resulting in the largest distributions around the median value (with a semi interquartile range larger than 0.1 dex). On the other hand, for most galaxies, the stellar mass estimates are relatively insensitive to the different parameterizations of the star formation history. The inclusion of nebular emission in the model spectra does not have a significant impact for the majority of galaxies (less than a factor of 2 for ~80% of the sample). Nevertheless, the stellar mass for the subsample of young galaxies (age < 100 Myr), especially in particular redshift ranges (e.g., 2.2 < z < 2.4, 3.2 < z < 3.6, and 5.5 < z < 6.5), can be seriously overestimated (by up to a factor of 10 for < 20 Myr sources) if nebular contribution is ignored.
  • We study the relationship between the structure and star-formation rate (SFR) of X-ray selected low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the two Chandra Deep Fields, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and deep far-infrared maps from the PEP+GOODS-Herschel survey. We derive detailed distributions of structural parameters and FIR luminosities from carefully constructed control samples of galaxies, which we then compare to those of the AGNs. At z~1, AGNs show slightly diskier light profiles than massive inactive (non-AGN) galaxies, as well as modestly higher levels of gross galaxy disturbance (as measured by visual signatures of interactions and clumpy structure). In contrast, at z~2, AGNs show similar levels of galaxy disturbance as inactive galaxies, but display a red central light enhancement, which may arise due to a more pronounced bulge in AGN hosts or due to extinguished nuclear light. We undertake a number of tests of these alternatives, but our results do not strongly favour one interpretation over the other. The mean SFR and its distribution among AGNs and inactive galaxies are similar at z>1.5. At z<1, however, clear and significant enhancements are seen in the SFRs of AGNs with bulge-dominated light profiles. These trends suggest an evolution in the relation between nuclear activity and host properties with redshift, towards a minor role for mergers and interactions at z>1.5.
  • Distant powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGN) tend to reside in dense environments and are commonly found in proto-clusters at z > 1.3. We examine whether this occurs because RLAGN are hosted by massive galaxies, which preferentially reside in rich environments. We compare the environments of powerful RLAGN at 1.3 < z < 3.2 from the CARLA survey to a sample of radio-quiet galaxies matched in mass and redshift. We find the environments of RLAGN are significantly denser than those of radio-quiet galaxies, implying that not more than 50% of massive galaxies in this epoch can host powerful radio-loud jets. This is not an observational selection effect as we find no evidence to suggest it is easier to observe the radio emission when the galaxy resides in a dense environment. We therefore suggest that the dense Mpc-scale environment fosters the formation of a radio-jet from an AGN. We show that the number density of potential RLAGN host galaxies is consistent with every > 10^14 solar mass cluster having experienced powerful radio-loud feedback of duration ~60 Myr during 1.3 < z < 3.2. This feedback could heat the intracluster medium to the extent of 0.5-1 keV per gas particle, which could limit the amount of gas available for further star formation in the proto-cluster galaxies.
  • We analyse new SCUBA-2 submillimeter and archival SPIRE far-infrared imaging of a z=1.62 cluster, Cl0218.3-0510, which lies in the UKIDSS/UDS field of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. Combining these tracers of obscured star formation activity with the extensive photometric and spectroscopic information available for this field, we identify 31 far-infrared/submillimeter-detected probable cluster members with bolometric luminosities >1e12 Lo and show that by virtue of their dust content and activity, these represent some of the reddest and brightest galaxies in this structure. We exploit Cycle-1 ALMA submillimeter continuum imaging which covers one of these sources to confirm the identification of a SCUBA-2-detected ultraluminous star-forming galaxy in this structure. Integrating the total star-formation activity in the central region of the structure, we estimate that it is an order of magnitude higher (in a mass-normalised sense) than clusters at z~0.5-1. However, we also find that the most active cluster members do not reside in the densest regions of the structure, which instead host a population of passive and massive, red galaxies. We suggest that while the passive and active populations have comparable near-infrared luminosities at z=1.6, M(H)~-23, the subsequent stronger fading of the more active galaxies means that they will evolve into passive systems at the present-day which are less luminous than the descendants of those galaxies which were already passive at z~1.6 (M(H)~-20.5 and M(H)~-21.5 respectively at z~0). We conclude that the massive galaxy population in the dense cores of present-day clusters were already in place at z=1.6 and that in Cl0218.3-0510 we are seeing continuing infall of less extreme, but still ultraluminous, star-forming galaxies onto a pre-existing structure.
  • We investigate galactic-scale outflows in the redshift range 0.71 < z < 1.63, using 413 K-band selected galaxies observed in the spectroscopic follow-up of the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey (UDSz). The galaxies have an average stellar mass of ~10^9.5 solar masses and span a wide range in rest-frame colours, representing typical star-forming galaxies at this epoch. We stack the spectra by various galaxy properties, including stellar mass, [OII] equivalent width, star-formation rate, specific star-formation rate and rest-frame spectral indices. We find that outflows are present in virtually all spectral stacks, with velocities ranging from 100-1000 km s^-1, indicating that large-scale outflowing winds are a common property at these redshifts. The highest velocity outflows (>500 km s^-1) are found in galaxies with the highest stellar masses and the youngest stellar populations. Our findings suggest that high velocity galactic outflows are mostly driven by star-forming processes rather than AGN, with implied mass outflow rates comparable to the rates of star formation. Such behaviour is consistent with models required to reproduce the high-redshift mass-metallicity relation.
  • We investigate the relation between star formation rates and local galaxy environment for a stellar mass selected galaxy sample in the redshift range 1.5 < z < 3. We use near-infra-red imaging from an extremely deep Hubble Space Telescope survey, the GOODS-NICMOS Survey (GNS) to measure local galaxy densities based on the nearest neighbour approach, while star-formation rates are estimated from rest-frame UV-fluxes. Due to our imaging depth we can examine galaxies down to a colour-independent stellar mass completeness limit of log M\ast = 9.5 M\odot at z ~ 3. We find a strong dependence of star formation activity on galaxy stellar mass over the whole redshift range, which does not depend on local environment. The average star formation rates are largely independent of local environment apart from in the highest relative over-densities. Galaxies in over-densities of a factor of > 5 have on average lower star formation rates by a factor of 2 - 3, but only up to redshifts of z ~ 2. We do not see any evidence for AGN activity influencing these relations. We also investigate the influence of the very local environment on star-formation activity by counting neighbours within 30 kpc radius. This shows that galaxies with two or more close neighbours have on average significantly lower star formation rates as well as lower specific star formation rates up to z ~ 2.5. We suggest that this might be due to star formation quenching induced by galaxy merging processes.
  • We examine in this paper a stellar mass selected sample of galaxies at 1 < z < 3 within the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, utilising WFC3 imaging to study the rest-frame optical morphological distribution of galaxies at this epoch. We measure how apparent morphologies (disk, elliptical, peculiar) correlate with physical properties, such as quantitative structure and spectral-types. One primary result is that apparent morphology does not correlate strongly with stellar populations, nor with galaxy structure at this epoch, suggesting a chaotic formation history for Hubble types at z > 1. By using a locally defined definition of disk and elliptical galaxies based on structure and spectral-type, we find no true ellipticals at z > 2, and a fraction of 3.2+/-2.3% at 1.5 < z < 2. Local counterparts of disk galaxies are at a similar level of 7-10%, much lower than the 75% fraction at lower redshifts. We further compare WFC3 images with the rest-frame UV view of galaxies from ACS imaging, showing that galaxies imaged with ACS that appear peculiar often contain an `elliptical' like morphology in WFC3. We show through several simulations that this larger fraction of elliptical-like galaxies is partially due to the courser PSF of WFC3, and that the `elliptical' class very likely includes early-type disks. We also measure the merger history for our sample using CAS parameters, finding a redshift evolution increasing with redshift, and a peak merger fraction of ~30% at z~2 for the most massive galaxies with M_*> 10^{10} M_sol, consistent with previous results from ACS and NICMOS. We compare our results to semi-analytical model results and find a relatively good agreement between our morphological break-down and the predictions. Finally, we argue that the peculiars, ellipticals and peculiar ellipticals have similar properties, suggesting similar formation modes, likely driven by major mergers.
  • We present the details and early results from a deep near-infrared survey utilising the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope centred around massive M_* > 10^11 M_0 galaxies at 1.7 < z < 2.9 found within the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. The GOODS NICMOS Survey (GNS) was designed to obtain deep F160W (H-band) imaging of 80 of these massive galaxies, as well as other colour selected objects such as Lyman-break drop-outs, BzK objects, Distant Red Galaxies, EROs, Spitzer Selected EROs, BX/BM galaxies, as well as sub-mm galaxies. We present in this paper details of the observations, our sample selection, as well as a description of features of the massive galaxies found within our survey fields. This includes: photometric redshifts, rest-frame colours, and stellar masses. We furthermore provide an analysis of the selection methods for finding massive galaxies at high redshifts, including colour selection, and how galaxy populations selected through different methods overlap. We find that a single colour selection method cannot locate all of the massive galaxies, with no one method finding more than 70 percent. We however find that the combination of these colour methods finds nearly all the massive galaxies, as selected by photometric redshifts with the exception of apparently rare blue massive galaxies. By investigating the rest-frame (U-B) vs. M_B diagram for these galaxies we furthermore show that there exists a bimodality in colour-magnitude space at z < 2, driven by stellar mass, such that the most massive galaxies are systematically red up to z~2.5, while lower mass galaxies tend to be blue. We also discuss the number densities for galaxies with stellar masses M_* > 10^11 M_0, whereby we find an increase of a factor of eight between z = 3 and z = 1.5, demonstrating that this is an epoch when massive galaxies establish most of their mass.