• We present Herschel/PACS observations of extended [CII]157.7{\mu}m line emission detected on ~ 1 - 10 kpc scales in 60 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We find that most of the extra-nuclear emission show [CII]/FIR ratios >~ 4 x 10^-3, larger than the mean ratio seen in the nuclei, and similar to those found in the extended disks of normal star-forming galaxies and the diffuse inter-stellar medium (ISM) of our Galaxy. The [CII] "deficits" found in the most luminous local LIRGs are therefore restricted to their nuclei. There is a trend for LIRGs with warmer nuclei to show larger differences between their nuclear and extra-nuclear [CII]/FIR ratios. We find an anti-correlation between [CII]/FIR and the luminosity surface density, {\Sigma}_IR, for the extended emission in the spatially-resolved galaxies. However, there is an offset between this trend and that found for the LIRG nuclei. We use this offset to derive a beam filling-factor for the star-forming regions within the LIRG disks of ~ 6 % relative to their nuclei. We confront the observed trend to photo-dissociation region (PDR) models and find that the slope of the correlation is much shallower than the model predictions. Finally, we compare the correlation found between [CII]/FIR and {\Sigma}_IR with measurements of high-redshift starbursting IR-luminous galaxies.
  • We present our initial results on the CO rotational spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of the $J$ to $J$$-$1 transitions from $J=4$ up to $13$ from Herschel SPIRE spectroscopic observations of 65 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The observed SLEDs change on average from one peaking at $J \le 4$ to a broad distribution peaking around $J \sim\,$6$-$7 as the IRAS 60-to-100 um color, $C(60/100)$, increases. However, the ratios of a CO line luminosity to the total infrared luminosity, $L_{\rm IR}$, show the smallest variation for $J$ around 6 or 7. This suggests that, for most LIRGs, ongoing star formation (SF) is also responsible for a warm gas component that emits CO lines primarily in the mid-$J$ regime ($5 \lesssim J \lesssim 10$). As a result, the logarithmic ratios of the CO line luminosity summed over CO (5$-$4), (6$-$5), (7$-$6), (8$-$7) and (10$-$9) transitions to $L_{\rm IR}$, $\log R_{\rm midCO}$, remain largely independent of $C(60/100)$, and show a mean value of $-4.13$ ($\equiv \log R^{\rm SF}_{\rm midCO}$) and a sample standard deviation of only 0.10 for the SF-dominated galaxies. Including additional galaxies from the literature, we show, albeit with small number of cases, the possibility that galaxies, which bear powerful interstellar shocks unrelated to the current SF, and galaxies, in which an energetic active galactic nucleus contributes significantly to the bolometric luminosity, have their $R_{\rm midCO}$ higher and lower than $R^{\rm SF}_{\rm midCO}$, respectively.
  • We present, for the first time, a statistical study of [N II] 205 mciron line emission for a large sample of local luminous infrared galaxies using Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE FTS) data. For our sample of galaxies, we investigate the correlation between the [N II] luminosity (LNII) and the total infrared luminosity (LIR), as well as the dependence of LNII/LIR ratio on LIR, far infrared colors (IRAS $f_{60}/f_{100}$) and the [O III] 88 micron to [N II] luminosity ratio. We find that LNII correlates almost linearly with LIR for non AGN galaxies (all having $L_{IR} < 10^{12} L_solar$) in our sample, which implies that LNII can serve as a SFR tracer which is particularly useful for high redshift galaxies which will be observed with forthcoming submm spectroscopic facilities such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Our analysis shows that the deviation from the mean LNII-LIR relation correlates with tracers of the ionization parameter, which suggests the scatter in this relation is mainly due to the variations in the hardness, and/or ionization parameter, of the ambient galactic UV field among the sources in our sample.
  • We present the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS), an 18 square degrees medium-deep survey at 3.6 and 4.5 microns with the post-cryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope to ~2 microJy (AB=23.1) depth of five highly observed astronomical fields (ELAIS-N1, ELAIS-S1, Lockman Hole, Chandra Deep Field South and XMM-LSS). SERVS is designed to enable the study of galaxy evolution as a function of environment from z~5 to the present day, and is the first extragalactic survey both large enough and deep enough to put rare objects such as luminous quasars and galaxy clusters at z>1 into their cosmological context. SERVS is designed to overlap with several key surveys at optical, near- through far-infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths to provide an unprecedented view of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies. In this paper, we discuss the SERVS survey design, the data processing flow from image reduction and mosaicing to catalogs, as well as coverage of ancillary data from other surveys in the SERVS fields. We also highlight a variety of early science results from the survey.
  • We present a statistical analysis of the mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of 248 luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) which comprise the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) observed with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The GOALS sample enables a direct measurement of the relative contributions of star-formation and active galactic nuclei (AGN) to the total IR emission from a large sample of local LIRGs. The AGN contribution to the MIR emission (f-AGN) is estimated by employing several diagnostics based on the properties of the [NeV], [OIV] and [NeII] fine structure gas emission lines, the 6.2 microns PAH and the shape of the MIR continuum. We find that 18% of all LIRGs contain an AGN and that in 10% of all sources the AGN contributes more than 50% of the total IR luminosity. Summing up the total IR luminosity contributed by AGN in all our sources suggests that AGN supply ~12% of the total energy emitted by LIRGs. The average spectrum of sources with an AGN looks similar to the average spectrum of sources without an AGN, but it has lower PAH emission and a flatter MIR continuum. AGN dominated LIRGs have higher IR luminosities, warmer MIR colors and are found in interacting systems more often than pure starbursts LIRGs. However we find no linear correlations between these properties and f-AGN. We used the IRAC colors of LIRGs to confirm that finding AGN on the basis of their MIR colors may miss ~40% of AGN dominated (U)LIRGs
  • We present an analysis of the extended mid-infrared (MIR) emission of the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample based on 5-15um low resolution spectra obtained with the IRS on Spitzer. We calculate the fraction of extended emission as a function of wavelength for the galaxies in the sample, FEE_lambda. We can identify 3 general types of FEE_lambda: one where it is constant, one where features due to emission lines and PAHs appear more extended than the continuum, and a third which is characteristic of sources with deep silicate absorption at 9.7um. More than 30% of the galaxies have a median FEE_lambda larger than 0.5 implying that at least half of their MIR emission is extended. Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) display a wide range of FEE in their warm dust continuum (0<=FEE_13.2um<=0.85). The large values of FEE_13.2um that we find in many LIRGs suggest that their extended MIR continuum emission originates in scales up to 10kpc. The mean size of the LIRG cores at 13.2um is 2.6kpc. However, once the LIR of the systems reaches the threshold of ~10^11.8Lsun, all sources become clearly more compact, with FEE_13.2um<=0.2, and their cores are unresolved. Our estimated upper limit for the core size of ULIRGs is less than 1.5kpc. The analysis indicates that the compactness of systems with LIR>~10^11.25Lsun strongly increases in those classified as mergers in their final stage of interaction. The FEE_13.2um is also related to the contribution of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to the MIR. Galaxies which are more AGN-dominated are less extended, independently of their LIR. We finally find that the extent of the MIR continuum emission is correlated with the far-IR IRAS log(f_60um/f_100um) color. This enables us to place a lower limit to the area in a galaxy from where the cold dust emission may originate, a prediction which can be tested soon with the Herschel Space Telescope.
  • We present excellent resolution and high sensitivity Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the 21cm HI line emission from the face-on galaxy NGC 1058, providing the first reliable study of the HI profile shapes throughout the entire disk of an external galaxy. Our observations show an intriguing picture of the interstellar medium; throughout this galaxy velocity-- dispersions range between 4 to 15 km/sec but are not correlated with star formation, stars or the gaseous spiral arms. The velocity dispersions decrease with radius, but this global trend has a large scatter as there are several isolated, resolved regions of high dispersion. The decline of star light with radius is much steeper than that of the velocity dispersions or that of the energy in the gas motions.
  • The nucleus of the nearby galaxy, NGC 1097, is known to host a young, compact (r < 9 parsec) nuclear star cluster as well as a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been suggested both that the nuclear stellar cluster is associated with a dusty torus, and that low-luminosity AGN like NGC 1097 do not have the torus predicted by the unified model of AGN. To investigate these contradictory possibilities we have acquired Gemini/T-ReCS 11.7 micron and 18.3 micron images of the central few hundred parsecs of this galaxy at < 45 parsec angular resolution, in which the nucleus and spectacular, kiloparsec-scale star-forming ring are detected in both bands. The small-scale mid-infrared (mid-IR) luminosity implies thermal emission from warm dust close to the central engine of this galaxy. Fitting of torus models shows that the observed mid-IR emission cannot be accounted for by dust heated by the central engine. Rather, the principal source heating the dust in this object is the nuclear star cluster itself, suggesting that the dust that we detect is not the torus of AGN unified schemes (although it is also possible that the dusty starburst itself could provide the obscuration invoked by the unified model). Comparison of Spitzer/IRS and Gemini/GNIRS spectra shows that, although polyaromatic hydrocarbon emission (PAH) bands are strong in the immediate circumnuclear region of the galaxy, PAH emission is weak or absent in the central 19 parsecs. The lack of PAH emission can probably be explained largely by destruction/ionization of PAH molecules by hard photons from the nuclear star cluster. If NGC 1097 is typical, PAH emission bands may not be a useful tool with which to find very compact nuclear starbursts even in low-luminosity AGN.
  • We report on the results of a search for an intergalactic X-ray dust scattering halo in a deep observation of the bright, high-redshift quasar QSO 1508+5714 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We do not detect such a halo. Our result implies an upper limit on the density of diffuse, large-grained intergalactic dust of Omega_ dust < 2 x 10^-6, assuming a characteristic grain size of 1micron. The result demonstrates the sensitivity of this technique for detecting very small amounts of intergalactic dust which are very hard to detect otherwise. This will allow us to put important constraints on systematic effects induced by extinction on the interpretation of the SN Ia Hubble Diagram, as well as on the amount and properties of cosmological dust being expelled into the intergalactic medium at early z~2 times.
  • We present sensitive phase-referenced VLBI results on the radio continuum emission from the z=4.7 double source BRI 1202-0725. The observations were carried out at 1425 MHz using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), the phased Very Large Array (VLA), and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Our sensitive VLBI images of BRI 1202-0725 at 0.25 x 0.14 arcsec resolution show a continuum structure in each of its two components. Fitting Gaussian models to these continuum structures yield total flux densities of 315 +/- 38 and 250 +/- 39 microJy, for the northern and the southern components, respectively. The estimated intrinsic brightness temperatures of these continuum structures are about 2 x 10^4 K. Neither component is detected at the full VLBI resolution (29 mas x 7 mas), with a 4 sigma point source upper limit of 40 microJy/beam, or an upper limit to the intrinsic brightness temperature of 6.7 x 10^5 K. The highest angular resolution with at least a 4sigma detection is about 85 mas. At this resolution, the images reveal a single continuum feature in the northern component of BRI 1202-0725, and two continuum features in the southern component, separated by 320 mas. This is similar to the structures seen in the high resolution images of the CO emission. The extent of the observed continuum sources at 1.4 GHz and the derived brightness temperatures are consistent with nuclear starbursts. Moreover, the absence of any compact high-brightness temperature source suggests that thereis no radio-loud AGN in BRI 1202-0725.
  • We present 1.4 and 5 GHz observations taken with the Very Large Array (VLA), and observations at 250 GHz obtained with the Max-Planck millimeter bolometer (MAMBO) at the IRAM 30~m telescope, of ten optically selected Quasi-stellar Objects (QSOs) at 5.0 < z < 6.28. Four sources are detected at 1.4 GHz two of which are radio loud and are also detected at 5 GHz. These results are roughly consistent with there being no evolution of the radio-loud QSO fraction out to z~6. Three sources have been detected at 250 GHz or 350 GHz at much higher levels than their 1.4 GHz flux densities suggesting that the observed mm emission is likely thermal emission from warm dust, although more exotic possibilities cannot be precluded. The highest redshift source in our sample (J1030+0524 at z=6.28) is not detected at 1.4 or 250 GHz, but four fairly bright radio sources (flux density at 1.4GHz > 0.2 mJy) are detected in a 2' field centered on the QSO, including an edge-brightened ('FRII') double radio source with an extent of about 1'. A similar over-density of radio sources is seen in the field of the highest redshift QSO J1148+5251. We speculate that these over-densities of radio sources may indicate clusters along the lines-of-sight, in which case gravitational lensing by the cluster could magnify the QSO emission by a factor 2 or so without giving rise to arcsecond-scale distortions in the optical images of the QSOs.