• We demonstrate an all-optical method for magnetic sensing of individual molecules in ambient conditions at room temperature. Our approach is based on shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers near the surface of a diamond crystal, which we use to detect single paramagnetic molecules covalently attached to the diamond surface. The manipulation and readout of the NV centers is all-optical and provides a sensitive probe of the magnetic field fluctuations stemming from the dynamics of the electronic spins of the attached molecules. As a specific example, we demonstrate detection of a single paramagnetic molecule containing a gadolinium (Gd$^{3+}$) ion. We confirm single-molecule resolution using optical fluorescence and atomic force microscopy to co-localize one NV center and one Gd$^{3+}$-containing molecule. Possible applications include nanoscale and in vivo magnetic spectroscopy and imaging of individual molecules.
  • We report on the results of a search for the electron electric dipole moment $d_e$ using paramagnetic ferroelectric Eu$_{0.5}$Ba$_{0.5}$TiO$_3$. The electric polarization creates an effective electric field that makes it energetically favorable for the spins of the seven unpaired $4f$ electrons of the Eu$^{2+}$ to orient along the polarization, provided that $d_e\neq 0$. This interaction gives rise to sample magnetization, correlated with its electric polarization, and is therefore equivalent to a linear magnetoelectric effect. A SQUID magnetometer is used to search for the resulting magnetization. We obtain $d_e = (-1.07\pm3.06_\text{stat}\pm 1.74_\text{sys})\times10^{-25}\ecm$, implying an upper limit of $|d_e|<6.05\times10^{-25}\ecm$ (90% confidence).
  • We have studied experimentally pressure broadening and shift of Ag D1 line caused by He, Ar and N2 buffer gases. The measurements were done in a heat-pipe type absorption cell at a temperature of ~1000 K and gas pressures up to 1000 torr. The measured values for pressure broadening and shift (in MHz/Torr) are as follows: Ag-He 5.8(1), +1.16(2); Ag-Ar 5.2(2), -2.28(4); Ag-N2 5.2(1), -2.52(7). The "+" and "-" signs indicate the direction for the shifts to the blue and red side of the spectrum, respectively.
  • We demonstrate a magnetometric technique based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation using amplitude modulated light. The magnetometers can be operated in either open-loop (typical nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with amplitude-modulated light) or closed-loop (self-oscillating) modes. The latter mode is particularly well suited for conditions where the magnetic field is changing by large amounts over a relatively short timescale.
  • We report measurements of the short-range forces between two macroscopic gold-coated plates using a torsion pendulum. The force is measured for separations between 0.7 $\mu$m and 7 $\mu$m, and is well described by a combination of the Casimir force, including the finite-temperature correction, and an electrostatic force due to patch potentials on the plate surfaces. We use our data to place constraints on the Yukawa-type "new" forces predicted by theories with extra dimensions. We establish a new best bound for force ranges 0.4 $\mu$m to 4 $\mu$m, and, for forces mediated by gauge bosons propagating in $(4+n)$ dimensions and coupling to the baryon number, extract a $(4+n)$-dimensional Planck scale lower limit of $M_*>70$ TeV.
  • Quantum theory predicts the existence of the Casimir force between macroscopic bodies, due to the zero-point energy of electromagnetic field modes around them. This quantum fluctuation-induced force has been experimentally observed for metallic and semiconducting bodies, although the measurements to date have been unable to clearly settle the question of the correct low-frequency form of the dielectric constant dispersion (the Drude model or the plasma model) to be used for calculating the Casimir forces. At finite temperature a thermal Casimir force, due to thermal, rather than quantum, fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, has been theoretically predicted long ago. Here we report the experimental observation of the thermal Casimir force between two gold plates. We measured the attractive force between a flat and a spherical plate for separations between 0.7 $\mu$m and 7 $\mu$m. An electrostatic force caused by potential patches on the plates' surfaces is included in the analysis. The experimental results are in excellent agreement (reduced $\chi^2$ of 1.04) with the Casimir force calculated using the Drude model, including the T=300 K thermal force, which dominates over the quantum fluctuation-induced force at separations greater than 3 $\mu$m. The plasma model result is excluded in the measured separation range.
  • Optical-window birefringence is frequently a major obstacle in experiments measuring changes in the polarization state of light traversing a sample under investigation. It can contribute a signal indistinguishable from that due to the sample and complicate the analysis. Here, we explore a method to measure and compensate for the birefringence of an optical window using the reflection from the last optical surface before the sample. We demonstrate that this arrangement can cancel out false signals due to the optical-window birefringence-induced ellipticity drift to about 1%, for the values of total ellipticity less than 0.25 rad.
  • We describe the first-principles design and subsequent synthesis of a new material with the specific functionalities required for a solid-state-based search for the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron. We show computationally that perovskite-structure europium barium titanate should exhibit the required large and pressure-dependent ferroelectric polarization, local magnetic moments, and absence of magnetic ordering even at liquid helium temperature. Subsequent synthesis and characterization of Eu$_{0.5}$Ba$_{0.5}$TiO$_3$ ceramics confirm the predicted desirable properties.
  • In a recent paper, Wicht, L\"ammerzahl, Lorek, and Dittus [Phys. Rev. {\bf A 78}, 013610 (2008)] come to the conclusion that a molecular rotational-vibrational quantum interferometer may possess the sensitivity necessary to detect gravitational waves. We do not agree with their results and demonstrate here that the true sensitivity of such interferometer is many orders of magnitude worse than that claimed in the mentioned paper. In the present comment we estimate the expected energy shifts and derive equations of motion for a quantum symmetric top (diatomic molecule or deformed nucleus) in the field of gravitational wave, and then estimate the sensitivity of possible experiments.
  • We propose to use ferroelectric (Eu,Ba)TiO$_3$ ceramics just above their magnetic ordering temperature for a sensitive electron electric dipole moment search. We have synthesized a number of such ceramics with various Eu concentrations and measured their properties relevant for such a search: permeability, magnetization noise, and ferroelectric hysteresis loops. The results of our measurements indicate that a search for the electron electric dipole moment with Eu$_{0.5}$Ba$_{0.5}$TiO$_3$ should lead to an order of magnitude improvement on the current best limit.
  • We have measured the short-range attractive force between crystalline Ge plates, and found contributions from both the Casimir force and an electrical force possibly generated by surface patch potentials. Using a model of surface patch effects that generates an additional force due to a distance dependence of the apparent contact potential, the electrical force was parameterized using data at distances where the Casimir force is relatively small. Extrapolating this model, to provide a correction to the measured force at distances less than 5 $\mu$m, shows a residual force that is in agreement, within experimental uncertainty, with five models that have been used to calculate the Casimir force.
  • We address a number of issues regarding solid state electron electric dipole moment (EDM) experiments, focusing on gadolinium iron garnet (abbreviated GdIG, chemical formula Gd$_3$Fe$_5$O$_{12}$) as a possible sample material. GdIG maintains its high magnetic susceptibility down to 4.2 K, which enhances the EDM-induced magnetization of a sample placed in an electric field. We estimate that lattice polarizability gives rise to an EDM enhancement factor of approximately 20. We also calculate the effect of the demagnetizing field for various sample geometries and permeabilities. Measurements of intrinsic GdIG magnetization noise are presented, and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is used to compare our data with the measurements of the imaginary part of GdIG permeability at 4.2 K, showing good agreement above frequencies of a few hertz. We also observe how the demagnetizing field suppresses the noise-induced magnetic flux, confirming our calculations. The statistical sensitivity of an EDM search based on a solid GdIG sample is estimated to be on the same level as the present experimental limit. Such a measurement would be valuable, given the completely different methods and systematics involved. The most significant systematics in such an experiment are the magnetic hysteresis and the magneto-electric effect. Our analysis shows that it should be possible to control these at the level of statistical sensitivity.
  • We study the magnetic properties of Gadolinium-Yttrium Iron Garnet ($\text{Gd}_{x}\text{Y}_{3-x}\text{Fe}_5\text{0}_{12}$, $x=3,1.8$) ferrite ceramics. The complex initial permeability is measured in the temperature range 2 K to 295 K at frequency of 1 kHz, and in the frequency range 100 Hz to 200 MHz at temperatures 4 K, 77 K, and 295 K. The magnetic viscosity-induced imaginary part of the permeability is observed at low frequencies. Measurements of the magnetization noise are made at 4 K. Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we find that the observed magnetization fluctuations are consistent with our measurements of the low-frequency imaginary part of permeability. We discuss some implications for proposed precision measurements as well as other possible applications.
  • Atomic vapor of four different paramagnetic species: gold, silver, lithium, and rubidium, is produced and studied inside several buffer gases: helium, nitrogen, neon, and argon. The paramagnetic atoms are injected into the buffer gas using laser ablation. Wires with diameters 25 $\mu$m, 50 $\mu$m, and 100 $\mu$m are used as ablation targets for gold and silver, bulk targets are used for lithium and rubidium. The buffer gas cools and confines the ablated atoms, slowing down their transport to the cell walls. Buffer gas temperatures between 20 K and 295 K, and densities between $10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$ and $2\times10^{19}$ cm$^{-3}$ are explored. Peak paramagnetic atom densities of $10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$ are routinely achieved. The longest observed paramagnetic vapor density decay times are 110 ms for silver at 20 K and 4 ms for lithium at 32 K. The candidates for the principal paramagnetic-atom loss mechanism are impurities in the buffer gas, dimer formation and atom loss on sputtered clusters.
  • Motivated by a recent proposal by O. P. Sushkov and co-workers to search for a P,T-violating Schiff moment of the $^{207}$Pb nucleus in a ferroelectric solid, we have carried out a high-field nuclear magnetic resonance study of the longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation of the lead nuclei from room temperature down to 10 K for powder samples of lead titanate (PT), lead zirconium titanate (PZT), and a PT monocrystal. For all powder samples and independently of temperature, transverse relaxation times were found to be $T_2\approx 1.5 $ms, while the longitudinal relaxation times exhibited a temperature dependence, with $T_1$ of over an hour at the lowest temperatures, decreasing to $T_1\approx 7 $s at room temperature. At high temperatures, the observed behavior is consistent with a two-phonon Raman process, while in the low temperature limit, the relaxation appears to be dominated by a single-phonon (direct) process involving magnetic impurities. This is the first study of temperature-dependent nuclear-spin relaxation in PT and PZT ferroelectrics at such low temperatures. We discuss the implications of the results for the Schiff-moment search.
  • Crystals of metallic rubidium are observed ``growing'' from paraffin coating of buffer-gas-free glass vapor cells. The crystals have uniform square cross-section, $\approx 30 \mu$m on the side, and reach several mm in length.
  • Experiments searching for parity- and time-reversal-invariance-violating effects that rely on measuring magnetization of a condensed-matter sample induced by application of an electric field are considered. A limit on statistical sensitivity arises due to random fluctuations of the spins in the sample. The scaling of this limit with the number of spins and their relaxation time is derived. Application to an experiment searching for nuclear Schiff moment in a ferroelectric is discussed.
  • The transmission characteristics of commercial interference filters are not quite what we expected from the specifications provided by manufacturers. The unexpectedly sharp dependences of the transmission coefficient on the incidence angle, wavelength, and on the position where the light beam falls on the filter may be important in the analysis of systematic effects in experiments incorporating interference filters.
  • In a recent letter [Auzinsh {\it{et. al.}} (physics/0403097)] we have analyzed the noise properties of an idealized atomic magnetometer that utilizes spin squeezing induced by a continuous quantum nondemolition measurement. Such a magnetometer measures spin precession of $N$ atomic spins by detecting optical rotation of far-detuned probe light. Here we consider maximally squeezed probe light, and carry out a detailed derivation of the contribution to the noise in a magnetometric measurement due to the differential AC Stark shift between Zeeman sublevels arising from quantum fluctuations of the probe polarization.
  • Noise properties of an idealized atomic magnetometer that utilizes spin squeezing induced by a continuous quantum nondemolition measurement are considered. Such a magnetometer measures spin precession of $N$ atomic spins by detecting optical rotation of far-detuned light. Fundamental noise sources include the quantum projection noise and the photon shot-noise. For measurement times much shorter than the spin-relaxation time observed in the absence of light ($\tau_{\rm rel}$) divided by $\sqrt{N}$, the optimal sensitivity of the magnetometer scales as $N^{-3/4}$, so an advantage over the usual sensitivity scaling as $N^{-1/2}$ can be achieved. However, at longer measurement times, the optimized sensitivity scales as $N^{-1/2}$, as for a usual shot-noise limited magnetometer. If strongly squeezed probe light is used, the Heisenberg uncertainty limit may, in principle, be reached for very short measurement times. However, if the measurement time exceeds $\tau_{\rm rel}/N$, the $N^{-1/2}$ scaling is again restored.
  • The electro-optical Kerr effect induced by a slowly-varying applied electric field in liquid helium at temperatures below the $\lambda$-point is investigated. The Kerr constant of liquid helium is measured to be $(1.43\pm 0.02^{(stat)} \pm 0.04^{(sys)})\times 10^{-20}$ (cm/V)$^2$ at $T=1.5$ K. Within the experimental uncertainty, the Kerr constant is independent of temperature in the range $T=1.5$ K to 2.17 K, which implies that the Kerr constant of the superfluid component of liquid helium is the same as that of normal liquid helium. Our result also indicates that pair and higher correlations of He atoms in the liquid phase account for about 23% of the measured Kerr constant. Liquid nitrogen was used to test the experimental set-up, the result for the liquid nitrogen Kerr constant is $(4.38\pm 0.15)\times 10^{-18} $(cm/V)$^2$. The knowledge of the Kerr constant in these media allows the Kerr effect to be used as a non-contact technique for measuring the magnitude and mapping out the distribution of electric fields inside these cryogenic insulants.