• We present ALMA observations of the CO(6-5) and [CII] emission lines and the sub-millimetre continuum of the QSO SDSS J231038.88+185519.7. Our data have x10 better angular resolution and x10 better sensitivity in the CO(6-5) line, compared to previous studies, and enable us to resolve for the first time the molecular disk of a z~6 QSO. We find that the dense molecular gas emission is resolved in a rotating disk of size of 2.9+-0.5 kpc. The dust continuum has a size of 1.4+-0.2 kpc. We measure a molecular gas mass of $\rm M(H_2)=(3.2 \pm0.2) \times 10^{10}\rm M_{\odot}$, and a dynamical mass of $\rm M_{dyn} = (4.1\pm0.5) \times 10^{10}~ M_{\odot}$, which is a factor of 2 smaller than the previously reported [CII]-based estimate. We find a molecular gas fraction of $\mu=M(H_2)/M^*=3.5\pm0.6$. We derive a ratio $v_{rot}/\sigma \approx 1-2$ suggesting high gas turbulence and/or outflows/inflows. We estimate a global Toomre parameter Q= 0.2-0.5, indicating likely cloud fragmentation. We compare, at the same angular resolution, the CO(6-5) and [CII] distributions, finding that dense molecular gas is more centrally concentrated with respect to [CII], and that they show different line profiles. We provide a new estimate of the black hole mass using the CIV emission line detected in the X-SHOOTER/VLT spectrum, $\rm M_{BH}=(2.9\pm 0.3) \times 10^{9}~ M_{\odot}$. We find that all the high redshift QSOs, including J2310+1855, are in a regime where the QSO can drive massive outflows with loading factor $\eta>1$, if the scaling relations hold at these extreme regimes and at high redshift. We find that the current BH growth rate is similar to that of its host galaxy. We detect two line-emitting companions within 1000 km/s from the QSO redshift, located at projected distances of <30 kpc from the QSO. These galaxies trace an over-density around the QSO [...].
  • The recent discovery of dusty galaxies well into the Epoch of Reionization (redshift $z>6$) poses challenging questions about the properties of the interstellar medium in these pristine systems. By combining state-of-the-art hydrodynamic and dust radiative transfer simulations, we address these questions focusing on the recently discovered dusty galaxy A2744_YD4 ($z=8.38$, Laporte et al. 2017}). We show that we can reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) only using different physical values with respect to the inferred ones by Laporte et al(2017), i.e. a star formation rate of $\mathrm{SFR} = 78\;\rm M_\odot \rm yr^{-1}$, a factor $\approx 4$ higher than deduced from simple Spectral Energy Distribution fitting. In this case we find: (a) dust attenuation (corresponding to $\tau_V=1.4$) is consistent with a Milky Way extinction curve; (b) the dust-to-metal ratio is low, $f_\mathrm{d} \sim 0.08$, implying that early dust formation is rather inefficient; (c) the luminosity-weighted dust temperature is high, $T_d=91\pm 23\, \rm K$, as a result of the intense ($\approx 100\times$ MW) interstellar radiation field; (d) due to the high $T_d$, the ALMA Band 7 detection can be explained by a limited dust mass, $M_d=1.6\times 10^6 $M$_\odot$. Finally, the high dust temperatures might solve the puzzling low infrared excess recently deduced for high-$z$ galaxies from the IRX-$\beta$ relation.
  • We present the first attempt to detect outflows from galaxies approaching the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) using a sample of 9 star-forming ($\rm SFR=31\pm 20~M_{\odot}~yr^{-1}$) $z\sim 5.5$ galaxies for which the [CII]158$\mu$m line has been previously obtained with ALMA. We first fit each line with a Gaussian function and compute the residuals by subtracting the best fitting model from the data. We combine the residuals of all sample galaxies and find that the total signal is characterised by a flux excess of $\sim 0.5$ mJy extended over $\sim 1000$ km~s$^{-1}$. Although we cannot exclude that part of this signal is due to emission from faint satellite galaxies, we show that the most probable explanation for the detected flux excess is the presence of broad wings in the [CII] lines, signatures of starburst-driven outflows. We infer an average outflow rate of $\rm \dot{M}=54\pm23~ M_{\odot}~yr^{-1}$, providing a loading factor $\eta=\rm \dot{M}/SFR=1.7\pm1.3$ in agreement with observed local starbursts. Our interpretation is consistent with outcomes from zoomed hydro-simulations of {\it Dahlia}, a $z\sim 6$ galaxy ($\rm SFR\sim 100~\rm M_{\odot}~yr^{-1}$) whose feedback-regulated star formation results into an outflow rate $\rm \dot{M}\sim 30~ M_{\odot}~yr^{-1}$. The quality of the ALMA data is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of the [CII] line profile in individual galaxies. Nevertheless, our results suggest that starburst-driven outflows are in place in the EoR and provide useful indications for future ALMA campaigns. Deeper observations of the [CII] line in this sample are required to better characterise feedback at high-$z$ and to understand the role of outflows in shaping early galaxy formation.
  • We present spectroscopic follow-up observations of CR7 with ALMA, targeted at constraining the infrared (IR) continuum and [CII]$_{158 \mu \rm m}$ line-emission at high spatial resolution matched to the HST/WFC3 imaging. CR7 is a luminous Ly$\alpha$ emitting galaxy at $z=6.6$ that consists of three separated UV-continuum components. Our observations reveal several well-separated components of [CII] emission. The two most luminous components in [CII] coincide with the brightest UV components (A and B), blue-shifted by $\approx 150$ km s$^{-1}$ with respect to the peak of Ly$\alpha$ emission. Other [CII] components are observed close to UV clumps B and C and are blue-shifted by $\approx300$ and $\approx80$ km s$^{-1}$ with respect to the systemic redshift. We do not detect FIR continuum emission due to dust with a 3$\sigma$ limiting luminosity L$_{\rm IR} (T_d = 35 \rm \, K) < 3.1\times10^{10}$ L$_{\odot}$. This allows us to mitigate uncertainties in the dust-corrected SFR and derive SFRs for the three UV clumps A, B and C of 28, 5 and 7 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. All clumps have [CII] luminosities consistent within the scatter observed in the local relation between SFR and L$_{\rm [CII]}$, implying that strong Ly$\alpha$ emission does not necessarily anti-correlate with [CII] luminosity. Combining our measurements with the literature, we show that galaxies with blue UV slopes have weaker [CII] emission at fixed SFR, potentially due to their lower metallicities and/or higher photoionisation. Comparison with hydrodynamical simulations suggests that CR7's clumps have metallicities of $0.1<\rm Z/Z_{\odot}<0.2$. The observed ISM structure of CR7 indicates that we are likely witnessing the build up of a central galaxy in the early Universe through complex accretion of satellites.
  • IR spectroscopy in the range 12-230 micron with the SPace IR telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will reveal the physical processes that govern the formation and evolution of galaxies and black holes through cosmic time, bridging the gap between the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the new generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) at shorter wavelengths and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at longer wavelengths. SPICA, with its 2.5-m telescope actively-cooled to below 8K, will obtain the first spectroscopic determination, in the mid-IR rest-frame, of both the star-formation rate and black hole accretion rate histories of galaxies, reaching lookback times of 12 Gyr, for large statistically significant samples. Densities, temperatures, radiation fields and gas-phase metallicities will be measured in dust-obscured galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN), sampling a large range in mass and luminosity, from faint local dwarf galaxies to luminous quasars in the distant Universe. AGN and starburst feedback and feeding mechanisms in distant galaxies will be uncovered through detailed measurements of molecular and atomic line profiles. SPICA's large-area deep spectrophotometric surveys will provide mid-IR spectra and continuum fluxes for unbiased samples of tens of thousands of galaxies, out to redshifts of z~6. Furthermore, SPICA spectroscopy will uncover the most luminous galaxies in the first few hundred million years of the Universe, through their characteristic dust and molecular hydrogen features.
  • We study the CO line luminosity ($L_{\rm CO}$), the shape of the CO Spectral Line Energy Distribution (SLED), and the value of the CO-to-$\rm H_2$ conversion factor in galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). To this aim, we construct a model that simultaneously takes into account the radiative transfer and the clumpy structure of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) where the CO lines are excited. We then use it to post-process state-of-the-art zoomed, high resolution ($30\, \rm{pc}$), cosmological simulation of a main-sequence ($M_{*}\approx10^{10}\, \rm{M_{\odot}}$, $SFR\approx 100\,\rm{M_{\odot}\, yr^{-1}}$) galaxy, "Alth{\ae}a", at $z\approx6$. We find that the CO emission traces the inner molecular disk ($r\approx 0.5 \,\rm{kpc}$) of Alth{\ae}a with the peak of the CO surface brightness co-located with that of the [CII] 158$\rm \mu m$ emission. Its $L_{\rm CO(1-0)}=10^{4.85}\, \rm{L_{\odot}}$ is comparable to that observed in local galaxies with similar stellar mass. The high ($\Sigma_{gas} \approx 220\, \rm M_{\odot}\, pc^{-2}$) gas surface density in Alth{\ae}a, its large Mach number (\mach$\approx 30$), and the warm kinetic temperature ($T_{k}\approx 45 \, \rm K$) of GMCs yield a CO SLED peaked at the CO(7-6) transition, i.e. at relatively high-$J$, and a CO-to-$\rm H_2$ conversion factor $\alpha_{\rm CO}\approx 1.5 \, \rm M_{\odot} \rm (K\, km\, s^{-1}\, pc^2)^{-1} $ lower than that of the Milky Way. The ALMA observing time required to detect (resolve) at 5$\sigma$ the CO(7-6) line from galaxies similar to Alth{\ae}a is $\approx13$ h ($\approx 38$ h).
  • To improve our understanding of high-z galaxies we study the impact of H$_{2}$ chemistry on their evolution, morphology and observed properties. We compare two zoom-in high-resolution (30 pc) simulations of prototypical $M_{\star}\sim 10^{10} {\rm M}_{\odot}$ galaxies at $z=6$. The first, "Dahlia", adopts an equilibrium model for H$_{2}$ formation, while the second, "Alth{\ae}a", features an improved non-equilibrium chemistry network. The star formation rate (SFR) of the two galaxies is similar (within 50\%), and increases with time reaching values close to 100 ${\rm M}_{\odot}/\rm yr$ at $z=6$. They both have SFR-stellar mass relation consistent with observations, and a specific SFR of $\simeq 5\, {\rm Gyr}^{-1}$. The main differences arise in the gas properties. The non-equilibrium chemistry determines the H$\rightarrow$ H$_{2}$~transition to occur at densities $> 300\,{cm}^{-3}$, i.e. about 10 times larger than predicted by the equilibrium model used for Dahlia. As a result, Alth{\ae}a features a more clumpy and fragmented morphology, in turn making SN feedback more effective. Also, because of the lower density and weaker feedback, Dahlia sits $3\sigma$ away from the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation; Alth{\ae}a, instead nicely agrees with observations. The different gas properties result in widely different observables. Alth{\ae}a outshines Dahlia by a factor of 7 (15) in [CII]~$157.74\,\mu{\rm m}$ (H$_{2}$~$17.03\,\mu{\rm m}$) line emission. Yet, Alth{\ae}a is under-luminous with respect to the locally observed [CII]-SFR relation. Whether this relation does not apply at high-z or the line luminosity is reduced by CMB and metallicity effects remains as an open question.
  • We present new ALMA observations of the [OIII]88$\mu$m line and high angular resolution observations of the [CII]158$\mu$m line in a normal star forming galaxy at z$=$7.1. Previous [CII] observations of this galaxy had detected [CII] emission consistent with the Ly$\alpha$ redshift but spatially slightly offset relative to the optical (UV-rest frame) emission. The new [CII] observations reveal that the [CII] emission is partly clumpy and partly diffuse on scales larger than about 1kpc. [OIII] emission is also detected at high significance, offset relative to the optical counterpart in the same direction as the [CII] clumps, but mostly not overlapping with the bulk of the [CII] emission. The offset between different emission components (optical/UV and different far-IR tracers) is similar to what observed in much more powerful starbursts at high redshift. We show that the [OIII] emitting clump cannot be explained in terms of diffuse gas excited by the UV radiation emitted by the optical galaxy, but it requires excitation by in-situ (slightly dust obscured) star formation, at a rate of about 7 M$_{\odot}$/yr. Within 20 kpc from the optical galaxy the ALMA data reveal two additional [OIII] emitting systems, which must be star forming companions. We discuss that the complex properties revealed by ALMA in the z$\sim$7.1 galaxy are consistent with expectations by recent models and cosmological simulations, in which differential dust extinction, differential excitation and different metal enrichment levels, associated with different subsystems assembling a galaxy, are responsible for the different appearance of the system when observed with different tracers.
  • With the aim of improving predictions on far infrared (FIR) line emission from Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC), we study the effects of photoevaporation (PE) produced by external far-ultraviolet (FUV) and ionizing (extreme-ultraviolet, EUV) radiation on GMC structure. We consider three different GMCs with mass in the range $M_{\rm GMC} = 10^{3-6}\,\rm{M_{\odot}}$. Our model includes: (i) an observationally-based inhomogeneous GMC density field, and (ii) its time evolution during the PE process. In the fiducial case ($M_{\rm GMC}\approx10^5 M_{\odot}$), the photoevaporation time ($t_{pe}$) increases from 1 Myr to 30 Myr for gas metallicity $Z=0.05-1\,\rm Z_{\odot}$, respectively. Next, we compute the time-dependent luminosity of key FIR lines tracing the neutral and ionized gas layers of the GMCs, ([CII] at $158\,\rm{\mu m}$, [OIII] at $88\,\rm \mu m$) as a function of $G_0$, and $Z$ until complete photoevaporation at $t_{pe}$. We find that the specific [CII] luminosity is almost independent on the GMC model within the survival time of the cloud. Stronger FUV fluxes produce higher [CII] and [OIII] luminosities, however lasting for progressively shorter times. At $Z=Z_{\odot}$ the [CII] emission is maximized ($L_{\rm CII}\approx 10^4\,\rm{L_{\odot}}$ for the fiducial model) for $t<1\,\rm{Myr}$ and $\log G_0\geq 3$. Noticeably, and consistently with the recent detection by Inoue et al. (2016) of a galaxy at redshift $z\approx 7.2$, for $Z\leq 0.2\,\rm{Z_{\odot}}$ the [OIII] line might outshine [CII] emission by up to $\approx 1000$ times. We conclude that the [OIII] line is a key diagnostic of low metallicity ISM, especially in galaxies with very young stellar populations.
  • We present zoom-in, AMR, high-resolution ($\simeq 30$ pc) simulations of high-redshift ($z \simeq 6$) galaxies with the aim of characterizing their internal properties and interstellar medium. Among other features, we adopt a star formation model based on a physically-sound molecular hydrogen prescription, and introduce a novel scheme for supernova feedback, stellar winds and dust-mediated radiation pressure. In the zoom-in simulation the target halo hosts "Dahlia", a galaxy with a stellar mass $M_*=1.6\times 10^{10}$M$_\odot$, representative of a typical $z\sim 6$ Lyman Break Galaxy. Dahlia has a total H2 mass of $10^{8.5}$M$_\odot$, that is mainly concentrated in a disk-like structure of effective radius $\simeq 0.6$ kpc and scale height $\simeq 200$ pc. Frequent mergers drive fresh gas towards the center of the disk, sustaining a star formation rate per unit area of $\simeq 15 $M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$. The disk is composed by dense ($n \gtrsim 25$ cm$^{-3}$), metal-rich ($Z \simeq 0.5 $ Z$_\odot$) gas, that is pressure-supported by radiation. We compute the $158\mu$m [CII] emission arising from {Dahlia}, and find that $\simeq 95\%$ of the total [CII] luminosity ($L_{[CII]}\simeq10^{7.5}$ L$_\odot$) arises from the H2 disk. Although $30\%$ of the CII mass is transported out of the disk by outflows, such gas negligibly contributes to [CII] emission, due to its low density ($n \lesssim 10$ cm$^{-3}$) and metallicity ($Z\lesssim 10^{-1}$Z$_\odot$). Dahlia is under-luminous with respect to the local [CII]-SFR relation; however, its luminosity is consistent with upper limits derived for most $z\sim6$ galaxies.
  • After two ALMA observing cycles, only a handful of [CII] $158\,\mu m$ emission line searches in z>6 galaxies have reported a positive detection, questioning the applicability of the local [CII]-SFR relation to high-z systems. To investigate this issue we use the Vallini et al. 2013 (V13) model, based on high-resolution, radiative transfer cosmological simulations to predict the [CII] emission from the interstellar medium of a z~7 (halo mass $M_h=1.17\times10^{11}M_{\odot}$) galaxy. We improve the V13 model by including (a) a physically-motivated metallicity (Z) distribution of the gas, (b) the contribution of Photo-Dissociation Regions (PDRs), (c) the effects of Cosmic Microwave Background on the [CII] line luminosity. We study the relative contribution of diffuse neutral gas to the total [CII] emission ($F _{diff}/F_{tot}$) for different SFR and Z values. We find that the [CII] emission arises predominantly from PDRs: regardless of the galaxy properties, $F _{diff}/F_{tot}\leq 10$% since, at these early epochs, the CMB temperature approaches the spin temperature of the [CII] transition in the cold neutral medium ($T_{CMB}\sim T_s^{CNM}\sim 20$ K). Our model predicts a high-z [CII]-SFR relation consistent with observations of local dwarf galaxies ($0.02<Z/Z_{\odot}<0.5$). The [CII] deficit suggested by actual data ($L_{CII}<2.0\times 10^7 L_{\odot}$ in BDF3299 at z~7.1) if confirmed by deeper ALMA observations, can be ascribed to negative stellar feedback disrupting molecular clouds around star formation sites. The deviation from the local [CII]-SFR would then imply a modified Kennicutt-Schmidt relation in z>6 galaxies. Alternatively/in addition, the deficit might be explained by low gas metallicities ($Z<0.1 Z_{\odot}$).
  • CR7 is the brightest $z=6.6 \, {\rm Ly}\alpha$ emitter (LAE) known to date, and spectroscopic follow-up by Sobral et al. (2015) suggests that CR7 might host Population (Pop) III stars. We examine this interpretation using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Several simulated galaxies show the same "Pop III wave" pattern observed in CR7. However, to reproduce the extreme CR7 ${\rm Ly}\alpha$/HeII1640 line luminosities ($L_{\rm \alpha/He II}$) a top-heavy IMF and a massive ($>10^{7}{\rm M}_{\odot}$) PopIII burst with age $<2$ Myr are required. Assuming that the observed properties of ${\rm Ly}\alpha$ and HeII emission are typical for Pop III, we predict that in the COSMOS/UDS/SA22 fields, 14 out of the 30 LAEs at $z=6.6$ with $L_{\alpha} >10^{43.3}{\rm erg}\,{\rm s}^{-1}$ should also host Pop III stars producing an observable $L_{\rm He II}>10^{42.7}{\rm erg}\,{\rm s}^{-1}$. As an alternate explanation, we explore the possibility that CR7 is instead powered by accretion onto a Direct Collapse Black Hole (DCBH). Our model predicts $L_{\alpha}$, $L_{\rm He II}$, and X-ray luminosities that are in agreement with the observations. In any case, the observed properties of CR7 indicate that this galaxy is most likely powered by sources formed from pristine gas. We propose that further X-ray observations can distinguish between the two above scenarios.
  • Cosmic metal enrichment is one of the key physical processes regulating galaxy formation and the evolution of the intergalactic medium (IGM). However, determining the metal content of the most distant galaxies has proven so far almost impossible; also, absorption line experiments at $z\sim6$ become increasingly difficult because of instrumental limitations and the paucity of background quasars. With the advent of ALMA, far-infrared emission lines provide a novel tool to study early metal enrichment. Among these, the [CII] line at 157.74 $\mu$m is the most luminous line emitted by the interstellar medium of galaxies. It can also resonant scatter CMB photons inducing characteristic intensity fluctuations ($\Delta I/I_{CMB}$) near the peak of the CMB spectrum, thus allowing to probe the low-density IGM. We compute both [CII] galaxy emission and metal-induced CMB fluctuations at $z\sim 6$ by using Adaptive Mesh Refinement cosmological hydrodynamical simulations and produce mock observations to be directly compared with ALMA BAND6 data ($\nu_{obs}\sim 272$ GHz). The [CII] line flux is correlated with $M_{UV}$ as $\log(F_{peak}/\mu{\rm Jy})=-27.205-2.253\,M_{UV}-0.038\,M_{UV}^2$. Such relation is in very good agreement with recent ALMA observations (e.g. Maiolino et al. 2015; Capak et al. 2015) of $M_{UV}<-20$ galaxies. We predict that a $M_{UV}=-19$ ($M_{UV}=-18$) galaxy can be detected at $4\sigma$ in $\simeq40$ (2000) hours, respectively. CMB resonant scattering can produce $\simeq\pm 0.1\,\mu$Jy/beam emission/absorptions features that are very challenging to be detected with current facilities. The best strategy to detect these signals consists in the stacking of deep ALMA observations pointing fields with known $M_{UV}\simeq-19$ galaxies. This would allow to simultaneously detect both [CII] emission from galactic reionization sources and CMB fluctuations produced by $z\sim6$ metals.
  • We study cosmic metal enrichment via AMR hydrodynamical simulations in a (10 Mpc/h)$^3$ volume following the Pop III-Pop II transition and for different Pop III IMFs. We have analyzed the joint evolution of metal enrichment on galactic and intergalactic scales at z=6 and z=4. Galaxies account for <9% of the baryonic mass; the remaining gas resides in the diffuse phases: (a) voids, i.e. regions with extremely low density ($\Delta$<1), (b) the true intergalactic medium (IGM, 1<$\Delta$<10) and (c) the circumgalactic medium (CGM, 10<$\Delta<10^{2.5}$), the interface between the IGM and galaxies. By z=6 a galactic mass-metallicity relation is established. At z=4, galaxies with a stellar mass $M_*=10^{8.5}M_\odot$ show log(O/H)+12=8.19, consistent with observations. The total amount of heavy elements rises from $\Omega^{SFH}_Z=1.52\, 10^{-6}$ at z=6 to 8.05 $10^{-6}$ at z=4. Metals in galaxies make up to ~0.89 of such budget at z=6; this fraction increases to ~0.95 at z=4. At z=6 (z=4) the remaining metals are distributed in CGM/IGM/voids with the following mass fractions: 0.06/0.04/0.01 (0.03/0.02/0.01). Analogously to galaxies, at z=4 a density-metallicity ($\Delta$-Z) relation is in place for the diffuse phases: the IGM/voids have a spatially uniform metallicity, Z~$10^{-3.5}$Zsun; in the CGM Z steeply rises with density up to ~$10^{-2}$Zsun. In all diffuse phases a considerable fraction of metals is in a warm/hot (T>$10^{4.5}$K) state. Due to these physical conditions, CIV absorption line experiments can probe only ~2% of the total carbon present in the IGM/CGM; however, metal absorption line spectra are very effective tools to study reionization. Finally, the Pop III star formation history is almost insensitive to the chosen Pop III IMF. Pop III stars are preferentially formed in truly pristine (Z=0) gas pockets, well outside polluted regions created by previous star formation episodes.
  • Intergalactic scintillation of distant quasars is sensitive to free electrons and therefore complements Ly$\alpha$ absorption line experiments probing the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM). We present a new scheme to compute IGM refractive scintillation effects on distant sources in combination with Adaptive Mesh Refinement cosmological simulations. First we validate our model by reproducing the well-known interstellar scintillation (ISS) of Galactic sources. The simulated cosmic density field is then used to infer the statistical properties of intergalactic scintillation. Contrary to previous claims, we find that the scattering measure of the simulated IGM at $z<2$ is $\langle \mbox{SM}_{\equ}\rangle=3.879$, i.e. almost 40 times larger than for the usually assumed smooth IGM. This yield an average modulation index ranging from 0.01 ($\nu_s=5$ GHz) up to 0.2 ($\nu_s=50$ GHz); above $\nu_{s}\gsim30$ GHz the IGM contribution dominates over ISS modulation. We compare our model with data from a $0.3\leq z\leq 2$ quasar sample observed at $\nu_{\obs}=8.4$ GHz. For this high frequency ($10.92\leq \nu_s \leq 25.2$), high galactic latitude sample ISS is negligible, and IGM scintillation can reproduce the observed modulation with a 4% accuracy, without invoking intrinsic source variability. We conclude by discussing the possibility of using IGM scintillation as a tool to pinpoint the presence of intervening high-$z$ groups/clusters along the line of sight, thus making it a probe suitably complementing Sunyaev-Zeldovich data recently obtained by \textit{Planck}.