• We develop a class of nonlocal delay Reaction-Diffusion (RD) models in a circular domain. Previous modeling efforts include RD population models with respect to one-dimensional unbounded domain, unbounded strip and rectangular spatial domain. However, the importance of an RD model in a symmetrical domain lies in the increasing number of empirical studies conducted with respect to symmetrical natural habitats of single species. Assuming that the single species has no directional preference to spread in the symmetrical domain, the RD model is reduced to an equation with no angular dependance. The model can be further reduced by considering the birth function in the form of the Bessel function of the first kind. We numerically simulate the reduced forms of the nonlocal delay RD model to study the dispersal and growth of behaviors of the single species in a circular domain. Although spatial patterns of population densities are gradually developed, it is numerically shown that the single species population goes extinct in the absence of the birth function or it may converge to a positive equilibrium in the presence of the birth function.
  • The axion is a light pseudoscalar particle which suppresses CP-violating effects in strong interactions and also happens to be an excellent dark matter candidate. Axions constituting the dark matter halo of our galaxy may be detected by their resonant conversion to photons in a microwave cavity permeated by a magnetic field. The current generation of the microwave cavity experiment has demonstrated sensitivity to plausible axion models, and upgrades in progress should achieve the sensitivity required for a definitive search, at least for low mass axions. However, a comprehensive strategy for scanning the entire mass range, from 1-1000 $\mu$eV, will require significant technological advances to maintain the needed sensitivity at higher frequencies. Such advances could include sub-quantum-limited amplifiers based on squeezed vacuum states, bolometers, and/or superconducting microwave cavities. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment at High Frequencies (ADMX-HF) represents both a pathfinder for first data in the 20-100 $\mu$eV range ($\sim$5-25 GHz), and an innovation test-bed for these concepts.
  • We have used the narrow $2S_{1/2} \rightarrow 3P_{3/2}$ transition in the ultraviolet (uv) to laser cool and magneto-optically trap (MOT) $^6$Li atoms. Laser cooling of lithium is usually performed on the $2S_{1/2} \rightarrow 2P_{3/2}$ (D2) transition, and temperatures of $\sim$300 $\mu$K are typically achieved. The linewidth of the uv transition is seven times narrower than the D2 line, resulting in lower laser cooling temperatures. We demonstrate that a MOT operating on the uv transition reaches temperatures as low as 59 $\mu$K. Furthermore, we find that the light shift of the uv transition in an optical dipole trap at 1070 nm is small and blue-shifted, facilitating efficient loading from the uv MOT. Evaporative cooling of a two spin-state mixture of $^6$Li in the optical trap produces a quantum degenerate Fermi gas with $3 \times 10^{6}$ atoms a total cycle time of only 11 s.
  • We have characterized a new Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) probe based on an iron filled carbon nanotube (FeCNT) using MFM imaging on permalloy (Py) disks saturated in a high magnetic field perpendicular to the disk plane. The experimental data are accurately modeled by describing the FeCNT probe as having a single magnetic monopole at its tip whose effective magnetic charge is determined by the diameter of the iron wire enclosed in the carbon nanotube and its saturation magnetization 4 \pi M_s ~ 2.2 x 10^4 G. A magnetic monopole probe enables quantitative measurements of the magnetic field gradient close to the sample surface. The lateral resolution is defined by the diameter of the iron wire ~15 nm and the probe-sample separation. As a demonstration, the magnetic field gradients close to the surface of a Py dot in domain and vortex states were imaged.