• We obtain constraints on cosmological parameters from the spherically averaged redshift-space correlation function of the CMASS Data Release 9 (DR9) sample of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We combine this information with additional data from recent CMB, SN and BAO measurements. Our results show no significant evidence of deviations from the standard flat-Lambda CDM model, whose basic parameters can be specified by Omega_m = 0.285 +- 0.009, 100 Omega_b = 4.59 +- 0.09, n_s = 0.96 +- 0.009, H_0 = 69.4 +- 0.8 km/s/Mpc and sigma_8 = 0.80 +- 0.02. The CMB+CMASS combination sets tight constraints on the curvature of the Universe, with Omega_k = -0.0043 +- 0.0049, and the tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio, for which we find r < 0.16 at the 95 per cent confidence level (CL). These data show a clear signature of a deviation from scale-invariance also in the presence of tensor modes, with n_s <1 at the 99.7 per cent CL. We derive constraints on the fraction of massive neutrinos of f_nu < 0.049 (95 per cent CL), implying a limit of sum m_nu < 0.51 eV. We find no signature of a deviation from a cosmological constant from the combination of all datasets, with a constraint of w_DE = -1.033 +- 0.073 when this parameter is assumed time-independent, and no evidence of a departure from this value when it is allowed to evolve as w_DE(a) = w_0 + w_a (1 - a). The achieved accuracy on our cosmological constraints is a clear demonstration of the constraining power of current cosmological observations.
  • The degeneracy among the disk, bulge and halo contributions to galaxy rotation curves prevents an understanding of the distribution of baryons and dark matter in disk galaxies. In an attempt to break this degeneracy, we present an analysis of the spiral galaxy strong gravitational lens SDSS J2141-0001, discovered as part of the SLACS survey. We present new Hubble Space Telescope multicolor imaging, gas and stellar kinematics data derived from long-slit spectroscopy, and K-band LGS adaptive optics imaging, both from the Keck telescopes. We model the galaxy as a sum of concentric axisymmetric bulge, disk and halo components and infer the contribution of each component, using information from gravitational lensing and gas kinematics. This analysis yields a best-fitting total (disk plus bulge) stellar mass of log_{10}(Mstar/Msun) = 10.99(+0.11,-0.25). The photometric data combined with stellar population synthesis models yield log_{10}(Mstar/Msun) = 10.97\pm0.07, and 11.21\pm0.07 for the Chabrier and Salpeter IMFs, respectively. Accounting for the expected gas fraction of \simeq 20% reduces the lensing plus kinematics stellar mass by 0.10\pm0.05 dex, resulting in a Bayes factor of 11.9 in favor of a Chabrier IMF. The dark matter halo is roughly spherical, with minor to major axis ratio q_{halo}=0.91(+0.15,-0.13). The dark matter halo has a maximum circular velocity of V_{max}=276(+17,-18) km/s, and a central density parameter of log_{10}\Delta_{V/2}=5.9(+0.9,-0.5). This is higher than predicted for uncontracted dark matter haloes in LCDM cosmologies, log_{10}\Delta_{V/2}=5.2, suggesting that either the halo has contracted in response to galaxy formation, or that the halo has a higher than average concentration. At 2.2 disk scale lengths the dark matter fraction is f_{DM}=0.55(+0.20,-0.15), suggesting that SDSS J2141-0001 is sub-maximal.
  • We use stellar masses, photometry, lensing, and velocity dispersions to investigate empirical correlations for the final sample of 73 early-type lens galaxies (ETGs) from the SLACS survey. The traditional correlations (Fundamental Plane [FP] and its projections) are consistent with those found for non-lens galaxies, supporting the thesis that SLACS lens galaxies are representative of massive ETGs. The addition of strong lensing estimates of the total mass allows us to gain further insights into their internal structure: i) the mean slope of the total mass density profile is <gamma'> = 2.078+/-0.027 with an intrinsic scatter of 0.16+/-0.02; ii) gamma' correlates with effective radius and central mass density, in the sense that denser galaxies have steeper profiles; iii) the dark matter fraction within reff/2 is a monotonically increasing function of galaxy mass and size; iv) the dimensional mass M_dim is proportional to the total mass, and both increase more rapidly than stellar mass M*; v) the Mass Plane (MP), obtained by replacing surface brightness with surface mass density in the FP, is found to be tighter and closer to the virial relation than the FP and the M*P, indicating that the scatter of those relations is dominated by stellar population effects; vi) we construct the Fundamental Hyper-Plane by adding stellar masses to the MP and find the M* coefficient to be consistent with zero and no residual intrinsic scatter. Our results demonstrate that the dynamical structure of ETGs is not scale invariant and that it is fully specified by the total mass, r_eff, and sigma. Although the basic trends can be explained qualitatively in terms of varying star formation efficiency as a function of halo mass and as the result of dry and wet mergers, reproducing quantitatively the observed correlations and their tightness may be a significant challenge for galaxy formation models.
  • We present the current photometric dataset for the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey, including HST photometry from ACS, WFPC2, and NICMOS. These data have enabled the confirmation of an additional 15 grade `A' (certain) lens systems, bringing the number of SLACS grade `A' lenses to 85; including 13 grade `B' (likely) systems, SLACS has identified nearly 100 lenses and lens candidates. Approximately 80% of the grade `A' systems have elliptical morphologies while ~10% show spiral structure; the remaining lenses have lenticular morphologies. Spectroscopic redshifts for the lens and source are available for every system, making SLACS the largest homogeneous dataset of galaxy-scale lenses to date. We have developed a novel Bayesian stellar population analysis code to determine robust stellar masses with accurate error estimates. We apply this code to deep, high-resolution HST imaging and determine stellar masses with typical statistical errors of 0.1 dex; we find that these stellar masses are unbiased compared to estimates obtained using SDSS photometry, provided that informative priors are used. The stellar masses range from 10^10.5 to 10^11.8 M$_\odot$ and the typical stellar mass fraction within the Einstein radius is 0.4, assuming a Chabrier IMF. The ensemble properties of the SLACS lens galaxies, e.g. stellar masses and projected ellipticities, appear to be indistinguishable from other SDSS galaxies with similar stellar velocity dispersions. This further supports that SLACS lenses are representative of the overall population of massive early-type galaxies with M* >~ 10^11 M$_\odot$, and are therefore an ideal dataset to investigate the kpc-scale distribution of luminous and dark matter in galaxies out to z ~ 0.5.
  • (Abridged) We present a joint gravitational lensing and stellar dynamical analysis of fifteen massive field early-type galaxies, selected from the Sloan Lens (SLACS) Survey. The following numerical results are found: (i) A joint-likelihood gives an average logarithmic density slope for the total mass density of 2.01 (+0.02/-0.03) (68 perecnt C.L). inside the Einstein radius. (ii) The average position-angle difference between the light distribution and the total mass distribution is found to be 0+-3 degrees, setting an upper limit of <= 0.035 on the average external shear. (iii) The average projected dark-matter mass fraction is inferred to be 0.25+-0.06 inside R_E, using the stellar mass-to-light ratios derived from the Fundamental Plane as priors. (iv) Combined with results from the LSD Survey, we find no significant evolution of the total density slope inside one effective radius: a linear fit gives d\gamma'/dz = 0.23+-0.16 (1-sigma) for the range z=0.08-1.01. The small scatter and absence of significant evolution in the inner density slopes suggest a collisional scenario where gas and dark matter strongly couple during galaxy formation, leading to a total mass distribution that rapidly converge to dynamical isothermality.