• We tested the validity of the three Larson relations in a sample of 213 massive clumps selected from the Herschel Hi-GAL survey and combined with data from the MALT90 survey of 3mm emission lines. The clumps have been divided in 5 evolutionary stages to discuss the Larson relations also as function of evolution. We show that this ensemble does not follow the three Larson relations, regardless of clump evolutionary phase. A consequence of this breakdown is that the virial parameter $\alpha_{vir}$ dependence with mass (and radius) is only a function of the gravitational energy, independent of the kinetic energy of the system, and $\alpha_{vir}$ is not a good descriptor of clump dynamics. Our results suggest that clumps with clear signatures of infall motions are statistically indistinguishable from clumps with no such signatures. The observed non-thermal motions are not necessarily ascribed to turbulence acting to sustain the gravity, but they may be due to the gravitational collapse at the clump scales. This seems particularly true for the most massive (M$\geq$1000 M$_{\odot}$) clumps in the sample, where also exceptionally high magnetic fields may not be enough to stabilize the collapse.
  • The origin of non-thermal motions in massive star forming regions can be ascribed to turbulence acting against the gravitational collapse, or to the self-gravity itself driving the rapid global collapse. The dependence between velocity dispersion, radius and clouds surface density found by Heyer et al. (2009), $\sigma/R^{1/2}\propto \Sigma^{1/2}$, has been interpreted in terms of global collapse of clouds. In this work we demonstrate that this relation is an expression of a more general relation between accelerations. We introduce the gravo-turbulent acceleration, a$_k$, which describe the non-thermal motions in each region, and the acceleration generated by the gravitational field a$_G$, which is proportional to $\Sigma$. We also introduce a new coefficient, the force partition coefficient $\alpha_{for}$ which is equivalent to the virial parameter but does not distinguish between collapsing and non-collapsing regions. In this work we use the a$_k$ - a$_G$ formalism in the analysis of a new sample of 16 massive starless clumps (MSCls) combined with data from the literature. We show that a$_k$ and a$_G$ are not independent. The non-thermal motions in each region can originate from both local turbulence and self-gravity but overall the data in the a$_k$ vs. a$_G$ diagram demonstrate that the majority of the non-thermal motions originate from self-gravity. We further show that all the MSCls with $\Sigma\geq 0.1$ g cm$^{-2}$ show signs of infall motions, a strong indication that the denser regions are the first to collapse. Finally, we include in the formalism the contribution of an external pressure and the magnetic fields.
  • The dynamic activity in massive star forming regions prior to the formation of bright protostars is still not fully investigated. In this work we present observations of HCO+ J=1-0 and N2H+ J=1-0 made with the IRAM 30m telescope towards a sample of 16 Herschel-identified massive 70 micron quiet clumps associated with infrared dark clouds. The clumps span a mass range from 300 M_sun to 2000 M_sun. The N2H+ data show that the regions have significant non-thermal motions with velocity dispersion between 0.28 km s^-1 and 1.5 km s^-1, corresponding to Mach numbers between 2.6 and 11.5. The majority of the 70 micron quiet clumps have asymmetric HCO+ line profiles, indicative of significant dynamical activity. We show that there is a correlation between the degree of line asymmetry and the surface density Sigma of the clumps, with clumps of Sigma>=0.1 g cm^-2 having more asymmetric line profiles, and so are more dynamically active, than clumps with lower Sigma. We explore the relationship between velocity dispersion, radius and Sigma and show how it can be interpreted as a relationship between an acceleration generated by the gravitational field a_G, and the measured kinetic acceleration, a_k, consistent with the majority of the non-thermal motions originating from self-gravity. Finally, we consider the role of external pressure and magnetic fields in the interplay of forces.
  • Hi-GAL is a large-scale survey of the Galactic plane, performed with Herschel in five infrared continuum bands between 70 and 500 $\mu$m. We present a band-merged catalogue of spatially matched sources and their properties derived from fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and heliocentric distances, based on the photometric catalogs presented in Molinari et al. (2016a), covering the portion of Galactic plane $-71.0^{\circ}< \ell < 67.0^{\circ}$. The band-merged catalogue contains 100922 sources with a regular SED, 24584 of which show a 70 $\mu$m counterpart and are thus considered proto-stellar, while the remainder are considered starless. Thanks to this huge number of sources, we are able to carry out a preliminary analysis of early stages of star formation, identifying the conditions that characterise different evolutionary phases on a statistically significant basis. We calculate surface densities to investigate the gravitational stability of clumps and their potential to form massive stars. We also explore evolutionary status metrics such as the dust temperature, luminosity and bolometric temperature, finding that these are higher in proto-stellar sources compared to pre-stellar ones. The surface density of sources follows an increasing trend as they evolve from pre-stellar to proto-stellar, but then it is found to decrease again in the majority of the most evolved clumps. Finally, we study the physical parameters of sources with respect to Galactic longitude and the association with spiral arms, finding only minor or no differences between the average evolutionary status of sources in the fourth and first Galactic quadrants, or between "on-arm" and "inter-arm" positions.
  • Massive clumps, prior to the formation of any visible protostars, are the best candidates to search for the elusive massive starless cores. In this work we investigate the dust and gas properties of massive clumps selected to be 70 micron quiet, therefore good starless candidates. Our sample of 18 clumps has masses 300 < M < 3000 M_sun, radius 0.54 < R < 1.00 pc, surface densities Sigma > 0.05 g cm^-2 and luminosity/mass ratio L/M < 0.3. We show that half of these 70 micron quiet clumps embed faint 24 micron sources. Comparison with GLIMPSE counterparts shows that 5 clumps embed young stars of intermediate stellar mass up to ~5.5 M_sun. We study the clump dynamics with observations of N2H+ (1-0), HNC (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) made with the IRAM 30m telescope. Seven clumps have blue-shifted spectra compatible with infall signatures, for which we estimate a mass accretion rate 0.04 < M_dot < 2.0 x 10^-3 M_sun yr^-1, comparable with values found in high-mass protostellar regions, and free-fall time of the order of t_ff = 3 x 10^5 yr. The only appreciable difference we find between objects with and without embedded 24 micron sources is that the infall rate appears to increase from 24 micron dark to 24 micron bright objects. We conclude that all 70 micron quiet objects have similar properties on clump scales, independently of the presence of an embedded protostar. Based on our data we speculate that the majority, if not all of these clumps may already embed faint, low-mass protostellar cores. If these clumps are to form massive stars, this must occur after the formation of these lower mass stars.
  • We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of star-forming objects located in the vicinities of 1 360 bubble structures throughout the Galactic Plane and their local environments. The compilation of ~70 000 star-forming sources, found in the proximity of the ionized (Hii) regions and detected in both Hi-GAL and GLIMPSE surveys, provided a broad overview of the different evolutionary stages of star-formation in bubbles, from prestellar objects to more evolved young stellar objects (YSOs). Surface density maps of star-forming objects clearly reveal an evolutionary trend where more evolved star-forming objects are found spatially located near the center, while younger star-forming objects are found at the edge of the bubbles. We derived dynamic ages for a subsample of 182 Hii regions for which kinematic distances and radio continuum flux measurements were available. We detect ~80% more star-forming sources per unit area in the direction of bubbles than in the surrounding fields. We estimate ~10% clump formation efficiency (CFE) of Hi-GAL clumps in bubbles, twice the CFE in fields not affected by feedback. We find higher CFE of protostellar clumps in younger bubbles, whose density of the bubble shells is higher. We argue that the formation rate from prestellar to protostellar phase is probably higher during the early stages of the bubble expansion. Evaluation of the fragmentation time inside the shell of bubbles advocates the preexistence of clumps in the medium before the bubble, as supported by numerical simulations. Approximately 23% of the Hi-GAL clumps are found located in the direction of a bubble, with 15% for prestellar clumps and 41% for protostellar clumps. We argue that the high fraction of protostellar clumps may be due to the acceleration of the star-formation process cause by the feedback of the (Hii) bubbles.
  • We present the first data release of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Plane Survey (JPS), the JPS Public Release 1 (JPSPR1). JPS is an 850-um continuum survey of six fields in the northern inner Galactic Plane in a longitude range of l=7-63, made with the Sub-millimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2). This first data release consists of emission maps of the six JPS regions with an average pixel-to-pixel noise of 7.19 mJy beam^-1, when smoothed over the beam, and a compact-source catalogue containing 7,813 sources. The 95 per cent completeness limits of the catalogue are estimated at 0.04 Jy beam^-1 and 0.3 Jy for the peak and integrated flux densities, respectively. The emission contained in the compact-source catalogue is 42 +- 5 per cent of the total and, apart from the large-scale (greater than 8') emission, there is excellent correspondence with features in the 500-um Herschel maps. We find that, with two-dimensional matching, 98 +- 2 per cent of sources within the fields centred at l=20, 30, 40 and 50 are associated with molecular clouds, with 91 +- 3 per cent of the l=30 and 40 sources associated with dense molecular clumps. Matching the JPS catalogue to Herschel 70-um sources, we find that 38 +- 1 per cent of sources show evidence of ongoing star formation. The images and catalogue will be a valuable resource for studies of star formation in the Galaxy and the role of environment and spiral arms in the star formation process.
  • The early evolution of massive cluster progenitors is poorly understood. We investigate the fragmentation properties from 0.3 pc to 0.06 pc scales of a homogenous sample of infrared-quiet massive clumps within 4.5 kpc selected from the ATLASGAL survey. Using the ALMA 7m array we detect compact dust continuum emission towards all targets, and find that fragmentation, at these scales, is limited. The mass distribution of the fragments uncovers a large fraction of cores above 40 $M_\odot$, corresponding to massive dense cores (MDCs) with masses up to ~400 $M_\odot$. 77 % of the clumps contain at most 3 MDCs per clump, and we also reveal single clumps/MDCs. The most massive cores are formed within the more massive clumps, and a high concentration of mass on small scales reveals a high core formation efficiency. The mass of MDCs highly exceeds the local thermal Jeans-mass, and observational evidence is lacking for a sufficiently high level of turbulence or strong enough magnetic fields to keep the most massive MDCs in equilibrium. If already collapsing, the observed fragmentation properties with a high core formation efficiency are consistent with the collapse setting in at parsec scales.
  • The expansion of HII regions can trigger the formation of stars. An overdensity of young stellar objects (YSOs) is observed at the edges of HII regions but the mechanisms that give rise to this phenomenon are not clearly identified. Moreover, it is difficult to establish a causal link between HII-region expansion and the star formation observed at the edges of these regions. A clear age gradient observed in the spatial distribution of young sources in the surrounding might be a strong argument in favor of triggering. We have observed the Galactic HII region RCW120 with herschel PACS and SPIRE photometers at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500$\mu$m. We produced temperature and H$_2$ column density maps and use the getsources algorithm to detect compact sources and measure their fluxes at herschel wavelengths. We have complemented these fluxes with existing infrared data. Fitting their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with a modified blackbody model, we derived their envelope dust temperature and envelope mass. We computed their bolometric luminosities and discuss their evolutionary stages. The herschel data, with their unique sampling of the far infrared domain, have allowed us to characterize the properties of compact sources observed towards RCW120 for the first time. We have also been able to determine the envelope temperature, envelope mass and evolutionary stage of these sources. Using these properties we have shown that the density of the condensations that host star formation is a key parameter of the star-formation history, irrespective of their projected distance to the ionizing stars.
  • (Abridged) We present the first public release of high-quality data products (DR1) from Hi-GAL, the {\em Herschel} infrared Galactic Plane Survey. Hi-GAL is the keystone of a suite of continuum Galactic Plane surveys from the near-IR to the radio, and covers five wavebands at 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron, encompassing the peak of the spectral energy distribution of cold dust for 8 < T < 50K. This first Hi-GAL data release covers the inner Milky Way in the longitude range 68{\deg} > l > -70{\deg} in a |b|<1{\deg} latitude strip. Photometric maps have been produced with the ROMAGAL pipeline, that optimally capitalizes on the excellent sensitivity and stability of the bolometer arrays of the {\em Herschel} PACS and SPIRE photometric cameras, to deliver images of exquisite quality and dynamical range, absolutely calibrated with {\em Planck} and {\em IRAS}, and recovering extended emission at all wavelengths and all spatial scales. The compact source catalogues have been generated with the CuTEx algorithm, specifically developed to optimize source detection and extraction in the extreme conditions of intense and spatially varying background that are found in the Galactic Plane in the thermal infrared. Hi-GAL DR1 images will be accessible via a dedicated web-based image cutout service. The DR1 Compact Source Catalogues are delivered as single-band photometric lists containing, in addition to source position, peak and integrated flux and source sizes, a variety of parameters useful to assess the quality and reliability of the extracted sources, caveats and hints to help this assessment are provided. Flux completeness limits in all bands are determined from extensive synthetic source experiments and depend on the specific line of sight along the Galactic Plane. Hi-GAL DR1 catalogues contain 123210, 308509, 280685, 160972 and 85460 compact sources in the five bands, respectively.
  • Galactic plane surveys of pristine molecular clouds are key for establishing a Galactic-scale view of the earliest stages of star formation. For this reason Peretto & Fuller (2009) built an unbiased sample of IRDCs in the 10 deg < |l| < 65 deg, |b|<1 deg region of the Galactic plane using Spitzer 8micron extinction. However, in absorption studies, intrinsic fluctuations in the mid-infrared background can be mis-interpreted as foreground clouds. The main goal of the study presented here is to disentangle real clouds in the Spitzer Dark Cloud (SDC) catalogue from artefacts due to fluctuations in the mid-infrared background. We constructed H_2 column density maps at ~18" resolution using the 160micron and 250micron data from the Herschel Galactic plane survey Hi-GAL. We also developed an automated detection scheme that confirms the existence of a SDC through its association with a peak on these Herschel column density maps. Detection simulations, along with visual inspection of a small sub-sample of SDCs, have been performed to get better insight into the limitations of our automated identification scheme. Our analysis shows that 76(+/-19)% of the catalogued SDCs are real. This fraction drops to 55(+/-12)% for clouds with angular diameters larger than ~1 arcminute. The contamination of the PF09 catalogue by large spurious sources reflect the large uncertainties associated to the construction of the 8micron background emission, a key stage towards the identification of SDCs. A comparison of the Herschel confirmed SDC sample with the BGPS and ATLASGAL samples shows that SDCs probe a unique range of cloud properties, reaching down to more compact and lower column density clouds than any of these two (sub-)millimetre Galactic plane surveys.
  • The origin of massive stars is a fundamental open issue in modern astrophysics. Pre-ALMA interferometric studies reveal precursors to early B to late O type stars with collapsing envelopes of 15-20 M$_\odot$ on 1000-3000 AU size-scales. To search for more massive envelopes we selected the most massive nearby young clumps from the ATLASGAL survey to study their protostellar content with ALMA. Our first results using the intermediate scales revealed by the ALMA ACA array providing 3-5" angular resolution, corresponding to $\sim$0.05-0.1 pc size-scales, reveals a sample of compact objects. These massive dense cores are on average two-times more massive than previous studies of similar types of objects. We expect that once the full survey is completed, it will provide a comprehensive view on the origin of the most massive stars.
  • We present early results from the JCMT Plane Survey (JPS), which has surveyed the northern inner Galactic plane between longitudes l=7 and l=63 degrees in the 850-{\mu}m continuum with SCUBA-2, as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Legacy Survey programme. Data from the l=30 degree survey region, which contains the massive star-forming regions W43 and G29.96, are analysed after approximately 40% of the observations had been completed. The pixel-to-pixel noise is found to be 19 mJy/beam, after a smooth over the beam area, and the projected equivalent noise levels in the final survey are expected to be around 10 mJy/beam. An initial extraction of compact sources was performed using the FellWalker method resulting in the detection of 1029 sources above a 5-{\sigma} surface-brightness threshold. The completeness limits in these data are estimated to be around 0.2 Jy/beam (peak flux density) and 0.8 Jy (integrated flux density) and are therefore probably already dominated by source confusion in this relatively crowded section of the survey. The flux densities of extracted compact sources are consistent with those of matching detections in the shallower ATLASGAL survey. We analyse the virial and evolutionary state of the detected clumps in the W43 star-forming complex and find that they appear younger than the Galactic-plane average.
  • We present a catalogue of starless and protostellar clumps associated with infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) in a 40 degrees wide region of the inner Galactic Plane (b<1). We have extracted the far-infrared (FIR) counterparts of 3493 IRDCs with known distance in the Galactic longitude range 15<l<55 and searched for the young clumps using Hi-GAL, the survey of the Galactic Plane carried out with the Herschel satellite. Each clump is identified as a compact source detected at 160, 250 and 350 mum. The clumps have been classified as protostellar or starless, based on their emission (or lack of emission) at 70 mum. We identify 1723 clumps, 1056 (61%) of which are protostellar and 667 (39%) starless. These clumps are found within 764 different IRDCs, 375 (49%) of which are only associated with protostellar clumps, 178 (23%) only with starless clumps, and 211 (28%) with both categories of clumps. The clumps have a median mass of 250 M_sun and range up to >10^4$ M_sun in mass and up to 10^5 L_sun in luminosity. The mass-radius distribution shows that almost 30% of the starless clumps identified in this survey could form high-mass stars, however these massive clumps are confined in only ~4% of the IRDCs. Assuming a minimum mass surface density threshold for the formation of high-mass stars, the comparison of the numbers of massive starless clumps and those already containing embedded sources suggests an upper limit lifetime for the starless phase of 10^5 years for clumps with a mass M>500 M_sun.
  • Recent ALMA observations identified one of the most massive star-forming cores yet observed in the Milky Way; SDC335-MM1, within the infrared dark cloud SDC335.579-0.292. Along with an accompanying core MM2, SDC335 appears to be in the early stages of its star formation process. In this paper we aim to constrain the properties of the stars forming within these two massive millimetre sources. Observations of SDC335 at 6, 8, 23 and 25GHz were made with the ATCA. We report the results of these continuum measurements, which combined with archival data, allow us to build and analyse the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the compact sources in SDC335. Three HCHII regions within SDC335 are identified, two within the MM1 core. For each HCHII region, a free-free emission curve is fit to the data allowing the derivation of the sources' emission measure, ionising photon flux and electron density. Using these physical properties we assign each HCHII region a ZAMS spectral type, finding two protostars with characteristics of spectral type B1.5 and one with a lower limit of B1-B1.5. Ancillary data from infrared to mm wavelength are used to construct free-free component subtracted SEDs for the mm-cores, allowing calculation of the bolometric luminosities and revision of the previous gas mass estimates. The measured luminosities for the two mm-cores are lower than expected from accreting sources displaying characteristics of the ZAMS spectral type assigned to them. The protostars are still actively accreting, suggesting that a mechanism is limiting the accretion luminosity, we present the case for two different mechanisms capable of causing this. Finally, using the ZAMS mass values as lower limit constraints, a final stellar population for SDC335 was synthesised finding SDC335 is likely to be in the process of forming a stellar cluster comparable to the Trapezium Cluster and NGC6334 I(N).
  • We present a new Hybrid Photometry and Extraction Routine: Hyper. It is designed to do compact source photometry allowing for varying spatial resolution and sensitivity in multi-wavelength surveys. Hyper combines multi-Gaussian fitting with aperture photometry to provide reliable photometry in regions with variable backgrounds and in crowded fields. The background is evaluated and removed locally for each source using polynomial fits of various orders. Source de-blending is done through simultaneous multi-Gaussian fitting of the main source and its companion(s), followed by the subtraction of the companion(s). Hyper allows also simultaneous multi-wavelength photometry by setting a fixed aperture size independent of the map resolution and evaluating the source flux within the same region of the sky at multiple wavelengths at the same time. This new code has been initially designed for precise aperture photometry in complex fields such as the Galactic plane observed in the far infrared (FIR) by the Herschel infrared survey of the Galactic plane (Hi-GAL). Hyper has been tested on both simulated and real Herschel fields to quantify the quality of the source identification and photometry. The code is highly modular and fully parameterisable, therefore it can be easily adapted to different experiments. Comparison of the Hyper photometry with the catalogued sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane survey (BGPS), the 1.1 mm survey of the Galactic Plane carried out with the Caltech Sub-millimeter observatory, demonstrates the versatility of Hyper on different datasets. It is fast and light in its memory usage, and it is freely available to the scientific community.
  • We present a study of the structure of the Galactic interstellar medium through the Delta-variance technique, related to the power spectrum and the fractal properties of infrared/sub-mm maps. Through this method, it is possible to provide quantitative parameters which are useful to characterize different morphological and physical conditions, and to better constrain the theoretical models. In this respect, the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey carried out at five photometric bands from 70 to 500 \mu m constitutes an unique database for applying statistical tools to a variety of regions across the Milky Way. In this paper, we derive a robust estimate of the power-law portion of the power spectrum of four contiguous 2{\deg}x2{\deg} Hi-GAL tiles located in the third Galactic quadrant (217{\deg} < l < 225{\deg}, -2{\deg} < b < 0{\deg}). The low level of confusion along the line of sight testified by CO observations makes this region an ideal case. We find very different values of the power spectrum slope from tile to tile but also from wavelength to wavelength (2 < \beta < 3), with similarities between fields attributable to components located at the same distance. Thanks to the comparison with models of turbulence, an explanation of the determined slopes in terms of the fractal geometry is also provided, and possible relations with the underlying physics are investigated. In particular, an anti-correlation between ISM fractal dimension and star formation efficiency is found for the two main distance components observed in these fields. A possible link between the fractal properties of the diffuse emission and the resulting clump mass function is discussed.
  • We present the data reduction pipeline for the Hi-GAL survey. Hi-GAL is a key project of the Herschel satellite which is mapping the inner part of the Galactic plane (|l| <= 70\cdot and |b| <= 1\cdot), using 2 PACS and 3 SPIRE frequency bands, from 70{\mu}m to 500{\mu}m. Our pipeline relies only partially on the Herschel Interactive Standard Environment (HIPE) and features several newly developed routines to perform data reduction, including accurate data culling, noise estimation and minimum variance map-making, the latter performed with the ROMAGAL algorithm, a deep modification of the ROMA code already tested on cosmological surveys. We discuss in depth the properties of the Hi-GAL Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) data.
  • Thermal images of cold dust in the Central Molecular Zone of the Milky Way, obtained with the far-infrared cameras on-board the Herschel satellite, reveal a 3x10^7 solar masses ring of dense and cold clouds orbiting the Galactic Center. Using a simple toy-model, an elliptical shape having semi-major axes of 100 and 60 parsecs is deduced. The major axis of this 100-pc ring is inclined by about 40 degrees with respect to the plane-of-the-sky and is oriented perpendicular to the major axes of the Galactic Bar. The 100-pc ring appears to trace the system of stable x_2 orbits predicted for the barred Galactic potential. Sgr A* is displaced with respect to the geometrical center of symmetry of the ring. The ring is twisted and its morphology suggests a flattening-ratio of 2 for the Galactic potential, which is in good agreement with the bulge flattening ratio derived from the 2MASS data.
  • Variations in the dust emissivity are critical for gas mass determinations derived from far-infrared observations, but also for separating dust foreground emission from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Hi-GAL observations allow us for the first time to study the dust emissivity variations in the inner regions of the Galactic plane at resolution below 1 degree. We present maps of the emissivity spectral index derived from the combined Herschel PACS 160 \mu m, SPIRE 250 \mu m, 350 \mu m, and 500 \mu m data, and the IRIS 100 \mu m data, and we analyze the spatial variations of the spectral index as a function of dust temperature and wavelength in the two Science Demonstration Phase Hi-GAL fields, centered at l=30{\deg} and l=59{\deg}. Applying two different methods, we determine both dust temperature and emissivity spectral index between 100 and 500 \mu m, at an angular resolution of 4'. Combining both fields, the results show variations of the emissivity spectral index in the range 1.8-2.6 for temperatures between 14 and 23 K. The median values of the spectral index are similar in both fields, i.e. 2.3 in the range 100-500 \mu m, while the median dust temperatures are equal to 19.1 K and 16.0 K in the l=30{\deg} and l=59{\deg} field, respectively. Statistically, we do not see any significant deviations in the spectra from a power law emissivity between 100 and 500 \mu m. We confirm the existence of an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, found in previous analyses.
  • Aims: To explore the infrared and radio properties of one of the closest Galactic starburst regions. Methods: Images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory at wavelengths of 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using the PACS and SPIRE arrays are analyzed and compared with radio continuum VLA data and 8 micron images from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The morphology of the far-infrared emission is combined with radial velocity measurements of millimeter and centimeter wavelength transitions to identify features likely to be associated with the W43 complex. Results: The W43 star-forming complex is resolved into a dense cluster of protostars, infrared dark clouds, and ridges of warm dust heated by massive stars. The 4 brightest compact sources with L > 1.5 x 10^4 Lsun embedded within the Z-shaped ridge of bright dust emission in W43 remain single at 4" (0.1 pc) resolution. These objects, likely to be massive protostars or compact clusters in early stages of evolution are embedded in clumps with masses of 10^3 to 10^4 Msun, but contribute only 2% to the 3.6 x 10^6 Lsun far-IR luminosity of W43 measured in a 16 by 16 pc box. The total mass of gas derived from the far-IR dust emission inside this region is ~10^6 Msun. Cometary dust clouds, compact 6 cm radio sources, and warm dust mark the locations of older populations of massive stars. Energy release has created a cavity blowing-out below the Galactic plane. Compression of molecular gas in the plane by the older HII region near G30.684-0.260 and the bipolar structure of the resulting younger W43 HII region may have triggered the current mini-star burst.
  • S. Molinari, B. Swinyard, J. Bally, M. Barlow, J. P. Bernard, P. Martin, T. Moore, A. Noriega-Crespo, R. Plume, L. Testi, A. Zavagno, A. Abergel, B. Ali, L. Anderson, P. André, J. P. Baluteau, C. Battersby, M. T. Beltrán, M. Benedettini, N. Billot, J. Blommaert, S. Bontemps, F. Boulanger, J. Brand, C. Brunt, M. Burton, L. Calzoletti, S. Carey, P. Caselli, R. Cesaroni, J. Cernicharo, S. Chakrabarti, A. Chrysostomou, M. Cohen, M. Compiegne, P. de Bernardis, G. de Gasperis, A. M. di Giorgio, D. Elia, F. Faustini, N. Flagey, Y. Fukui, G. A. Fuller, K. Ganga, P. Garcia-Lario, J. Glenn, P. F. Goldsmith, M. J. Griffin, M. Hoare, M. Huang, D. Ikhenaode, C. Joblin, G. Joncas, M. Juvela, J. M. Kirk, G. Lagache, J. Z. Li, T. L. Lim, S. D. Lord, M. Marengo, D. J. Marshall, S. Masi, F. Massi, M. Matsuura, V. Minier, M. A. Miville-Deschenes, L. A. Montier, L. Morgan, F. Motte, J. C. Mottram, T. G. Mueller, P. Natoli, J. Neves, L. Olmi, R. Paladini, D. Paradis, H. Parsons, N. Peretto, M. Pestalozzi, S. Pezzuto, F. Piacentini, L. Piazzo, D. Polychroni, M. Pomarès, C. C. Popescu, W. T. Reach, I. Ristorcelli, J. F. Robitaille, T. Robitaille, J. A. Rodón, A. Roy, P. Royer, D. Russeil, P. Saraceno, M. Sauvage, P. Schilke, E. Schisano, N. Schneider, F. Schuller, B. Schulz, B. Sibthorpe, H. A. Smith, M. D. Smith, L. Spinoglio, D. Stamatellos, F. Strafella, G. S. Stringfellow, E. Sturm, R. Taylor, M. A. Thompson, A. Traficante, R. J. Tuffs, G. Umana, L. Valenziano, R. Vavrek, M. Veneziani, S. Viti, C. Waelkens, D. Ward-Thompson, G. White, L. A. Wilcock, F. Wyrowski, H. W. Yorke, Q. Zhang
    May 18, 2010 astro-ph.GA
    We present the first results from the science demonstration phase for the Hi-GAL survey, the Herschel key-project that will map the inner Galactic Plane of the Milky Way in 5 bands. We outline our data reduction strategy and present some science highlights on the two observed 2{\deg} x 2{\deg} tiles approximately centered at l=30{\deg} and l=59{\deg}. The two regions are extremely rich in intense and highly structured extended emission which shows a widespread organization in filaments. Source SEDs can be built for hundreds of objects in the two fields, and physical parameters can be extracted, for a good fraction of them where the distance could be estimated. The compact sources (which we will call 'cores' in the following) are found for the most part to be associated with the filaments, and the relationship to the local beam-averaged column density of the filament itself shows that a core seems to appear when a threshold around A_V of about 1 is exceeded for the regions in the l=59{\deg} field; a A_V value between 5 and 10 is found for the l=30{\deg} field, likely due to the relatively larger distances of the sources. This outlines an exciting scenario where diffuse clouds first collapse into filaments, which later fragment to cores where the column density has reached a critical level. In spite of core L/M ratios being well in excess of a few for many sources, we find core surface densities between 0.03 and 0.5 g cm-2. Our results are in good agreement with recent MHD numerical simulations of filaments forming from large-scale converging flows.
  • In Herschel images of the Galactic plane and many star forming regions, a major factor limiting our ability to extract faint compact sources is cirrus confusion noise, operationally defined as the "statistical error to be expected in photometric measurements due to confusion in a background of fluctuating surface brightness". The histogram of the flux densities of extracted sources shows a distinctive faint-end cutoff below which the catalog suffers from incompleteness and the flux densities become unreliable. This empirical cutoff should be closely related to the estimated cirrus noise and we show that this is the case. We compute the cirrus noise directly, both on Herschel images from which the bright sources have been removed and on simulated images of cirrus with statistically similar fluctuations. We connect these direct estimates with those from power spectrum analysis, which has been used extensively to predict the cirrus noise and provides insight into how it depends on various statistical properties and photometric operational parameters. We report multi-wavelength power spectra of diffuse Galactic dust emission from Hi-GAL observations at 70 to 500 microns within Galactic plane fields at l= 30 degrees and l= 59 degrees. We find that the exponent of the power spectrum is about -3. At 250 microns, the amplitude of the power spectrum increases roughly as the square of the median brightness of the map and so the expected cirrus noise scales linearly with the median brightness. Generally, the confusion noise will be a worse problem at longer wavelengths, because of the combination of lower angular resolution and the rising power spectrum of cirrus toward lower spatial frequencies, but the photometric signal to noise will also depend on the relative spectral energy distribution of the source compared to the cirrus.
  • We present a first study of the star-forming compact dust condensations revealed by Herschel in the two 2 \times 2 \degr Galactic Plane fields centered at [l;b] = [30\degr; 0 \degr] and [l;b] = [59\degr; 0 \degr], respectively, and observed during the Science Demonstration Phase for the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane survey (Hi-GAL) Key-Project. Compact source catalogs extracted for the two fields in the five Hi-GAL bands (70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 $\mu$m) were merged based on simple criteria of positional association and spectral energy distribution (SED) consistency into a final catalog which contains only coherent SEDs with counterparts in at least three adjacent Herschel bands. These final source lists contain 528 entries for the l = 30\degr field, and 444 entries for the l = 59\degr field. The SED coverage has been augmented with ancillary data at 24 $\mu$m and 1.1 mm. SED modeling for the subset of 318 and 101 sources (in the two fields, respectively) for which the distance is known was carried out using both a structured star/disk/envelope radiative transfer model and a simple isothermal grey-body. Global parameters like mass, luminosity, temperature and dust properties have been estimated. The Lbol/Menv ratio spans four orders of magnitudes from values compatible with the pre-protostellar phase to embedded massive zero-age main sequence stars. Sources in the l = 59\degr field have on average lower L/M, possibly outlining an overall earlier evolutionary stage with respect to the sources in the l = 30\degr field. Many of these cores are actively forming high-mass stars, although the estimated core surface densities appear to be an order of magnitude below the 1 g cm$^{-2}$ critical threshold for high-mass star formation.
  • Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are cold and dense reservoirs of gas potentially available to form stars. Many of these clouds are likely to be pristine structures representing the initial conditions for star formation. The study presented here aims to construct and analyze accurate column density and dust temperature maps of IRDCs by using the first Herschel data from the Hi-GAL galactic plane survey. These fundamental quantities, are essential for understanding processes such as fragmentation in the early stages of the formation of stars in molecular clouds. We have developed a simple pixel-by-pixel SED fitting method, which accounts for the background emission. By fitting a grey-body function at each position, we recover the spatial variations in both the dust column density and temperature within the IRDCs. This method is applied to a sample of 22 IRDCs exhibiting a range of angular sizes and peak column densities. Our analysis shows that the dust temperature decreases significantly within IRDCs, from background temperatures of 20-30 K to minimum temperatures of 8-15 K within the clouds, showing that dense molecular clouds are not isothermal. Temperature gradients have most likely an important impact on the fragmentation of IRDCs. Local temperature minima are strongly correlated with column density peaks, which in a few cases reach NH2 = 1 x 10^{23} cm^{-2}, identifying these clouds as candidate massive prestellar cores. Applying this technique to the full Hi-GAL data set will provide important constraints on the fragmentation and thermal properties of IRDCs, and help identify hundreds of massive prestellar core candidates.