• The young planetary system {\beta} Pictoris is surrounded by a circumstellar disk of dust and gas. Because both dust and gas have a lifetime shorter than the system age, they need to be replenished continuously. The gas composition is partly known, but its location and its origin are still a puzzle. The gas source could be the exocomets (or so-called falling and evaporating bodies, FEBs), which are observed as transient features in absorption lines of refractory elements (Mg, Ca, and Fe) when they transit in front of the star at several tens of stellar radii. Nearly 1700 high-resolution spectra of {\beta} Pictoris have been obtained from 2003 to 2015 using the HARPS spectrograph. In these spectra, the circumstellar disk is always detected as a stable component among the numerous variable absorption signatures of transiting exocomets. Summing all the 1700 spectra allowed us to reach a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 1000, which is an unprecedentedly high number for a {\beta} Pictoris spectrum. It revealed many weak Fe I absorption lines of the circumstellar gas in more than ten excited states. These weak lines bring new information on the physical properties of the neutral iron gas in the circumstellar disk. The population of the first excited levels follows a Boltzmann distribution with a slope consistent with a gas temperature of about 1300 K; this temperature corresponds to a distance to the star of ~ 38 RStar and implies a turbulence of {\xi} ~ 0.8 km/s.
  • The M dwarf GJ 436 hosts a transiting warm Neptune known to experience atmospheric escape. Previous observations revealed the presence of a giant hydrogen exosphere transiting the star for more than 5 h, and absorbing up to 56% of the flux in the blue wing of the stellar Lyman-{\alpha} line of neutral hydrogen (H i Ly{\alpha}). The unexpected size of this comet-like exosphere prevented observing the full transit of its tail. In this Letter, we present new Ly{\alpha} observations of GJ 436 obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) instrument onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The stability of the Ly{\alpha} line over six years allowed us to combine these new observations with archival data sets, substantially expanding the coverage of the exospheric transit. Hydrogen atoms in the tail of the exospheric cloud keep occulting the star for 10-25 h after the transit of the planet, remarkably confirming a previous prediction based on 3D numerical simulations with the EVaporating Exoplanet code (EVE). This result strengthens the interpretation that the exosphere of GJ 436b is shaped by both radiative braking and charge exchanges with the stellar wind. We further report flux decreases of 15 +/- 2% and 47 +/- 10% in the red wing of the Ly{\alpha} line and in the line of ionised silicon (Si iii). Despite some temporal variability possibly linked with stellar activity, these two signals occur during the exospheric transit and could be of planetary origin. Follow-up observations will be required to assess the possibility that the redshifted Ly{\alpha} and Si iii absorption signatures arise from interactions between the exospheric flow and the magnetic field of the star.
  • The young and nearby star \beta\ Pictoris (\beta\ Pic) is surrounded by a debris disk composed of dust and gas known to host a myriad evaporating exocomets, planetesimals and at least one planet. At an edge-on inclination, as seen from Earth, this system is ideal for debris disk studies providing an excellent opportunity to use absorption spectroscopy to study the planet forming environment. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we observe the most abundant element in the disk, hydrogen, through the HI Lyman \alpha\ (Ly-\alpha\) line. We present a new technique to decrease the contamination of the Ly-\alpha\ line by geocoronal airglow in COS spectra. This Airglow Virtual Motion (AVM) technique allows us to shift the Ly-\alpha\ line of the astrophysical target away from the contaminating airglow emission revealing more of the astrophysical line profile. The column density of hydrogen in the \beta\ Pic stable gas disk at the stellar radial velocity is measured to be $\log(N_{\mathrm{H}}/1 \mathrm{cm}^2) \ll 18.5$. The Ly-\alpha\ emission line profile is found to be asymmetric and we propose that this is caused by HI falling in towards the star with a bulk radial velocity of $41\pm6$ km/s relative to \beta\ Pic and a column density of $\log(N_{\mathrm{H}}/1 \mathrm{cm}^2) = 18.6\pm0.1$. The high column density of hydrogen relative to the hydrogen content of CI chondrite meteorites indicates that the bulk of the hydrogen gas does not come from the dust in the disk. This column density reveals a hydrogen abundance much lower than solar, which excludes the possibility that the detected hydrogen could be a remnant of the protoplanetary disk or gas expelled by the star. We hypothesise that the hydrogen gas observed falling towards the star arises from the dissociation of water originating from evaporating exocomets.
  • In 1981, Beta Pictoris showed strong and rapid photometric variations possibly due to a transiting giant planet. Later, a planetary mass companion to the star, Beta Pic b, was identified using imagery. Observations at different epochs (2003 and 2009-2015) detected the planet at a projected distance of 6 to 9 AU from the star and showed that the planet is on an edge-on orbit. The observed motion is consistent with an inferior conjunction in 1981, and Beta Pic b can be the transiting planet proposed to explain the photometric event observed at that time. Assuming that the 1981 event is related to the transit or the inferior conjunction of Beta Pic b on an edge-on orbit, we search for the planetary orbit in agreement with all the measurements of the planet position published so far. We find two different orbits that are compatible with all these constraints: (i) an orbit with a period of 17.97$\pm$0.08 years along with an eccentricity of around 0.12 and (ii) an orbit with a period of 36.38$\pm$0.13 years and a larger eccentricity of about 0.32. In the near future, new imaging observations should allow us to discriminate between these two different orbits. We also estimate the possible dates for the next transits, which could take place as early as 2017 or 2018, even for a long-period orbit.
  • We present the detection of potassium in the atmosphere of HAT-P-1b using optical transit narrowband photometry. The results are obtained using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) together with the OSIRIS instrument in tunable filter imaging mode. We observed four transits, two at continuum wavelengths outside the potassium feature, at 6792 {\AA} and 8844 {\AA}, and two probing the potassium feature in the line wing at 7582.0 {\AA} and the line core at 7664.9 {\AA} using a 12 {\AA} filter width (R~650). The planet-to-star radius ratios in the continuum are found to be $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1176 $\pm$ 0.0013 at 6792 {\AA} and $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1168 $\pm$ 0.0022 at 8844 {\AA}, significantly lower than the two observations in the potassium line: $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1248 $\pm$ 0.0014 in the line wing at 7582.0 {\AA} and $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1268 $\pm$ 0.0012 in the line core at 7664.9 {\AA}. With a weighted mean of the observations outside the potassium feature $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1174 $\pm$ 0.0010, the potassium is detected as an increase in the radius ratio of {\Delta}$R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.0073 $\pm$ 0.0017 at 7582.0 {\AA} and {\Delta}$R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.0094 $\pm$ 0.0016 at 7664.9 {\AA} (a significance of 4.3 and 6.1 $\sigma$ respectively). We hypothesise that the strong detection of potassium is caused by a large scale height, which can be explained by a high-temperature at the base of the upper atmosphere. A lower mean molecular mass caused by the dissociation of molecular hydrogen into atomic hydrogen by the EUV flux from the host star may also partly explain the amplitude of our detection.
  • Transit observations of HD209458b in the UV revealed signatures of neutral magnesium escaping the planet's upper atmosphere. The absorption detected in the MgI line provides unprecedented information on the physical conditions at the altitude where the atmospheric blow-off takes place. Here we use a 3D model of atmospheric escape to estimate the transit absorption signatures in the MgI line of their host stars. The detectability of these signatures depends on the brightness of the star and the escape rate of neutral magnesium. We identify a sample of potentially evaporating exoplanets that covers a wide range of stellar and planetary properties, and whose extended exospheres might be detected through MgI line observations with current UV facilities, allowing further steps in comparative exoplanetology.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope optical and near-IR transmission spectra of the transiting hot-Jupiter WASP-31b. The spectrum covers 0.3-1.7 $\mu$m at a resolution $R\sim$70, which we combine with Spitzer photometry to cover the full-optical to IR. The spectrum is dominated by a cloud-deck with a flat transmission spectrum which is apparent at wavelengths $>0.52\mu$m. The cloud deck is present at high altitudes and low pressures, as it covers the majority of the expected optical Na line and near-IR H$_2$O features. While Na I absorption is not clearly identified, the resulting spectrum does show a very strong potassium feature detected at the 4.2-$\sigma$ confidence level. Broadened alkali wings are not detected, indicating pressures below $\sim$10 mbar. The lack of Na and strong K is the first indication of a sub-solar Na/K abundance ratio in a planetary atmosphere (ln[Na/K]$=-3.3\pm2.8$), which could potentially be explained by Na condensation on the planet's night side, or primordial abundance variations. A strong Rayleigh scattering signature is detected at short wavelengths, with a 4-$\sigma$ significant slope. Two distinct aerosol size populations can explain the spectra, with a smaller sub-micron size grain population reaching high altitudes producing a blue Rayleigh scattering signature on top of a larger, lower-lying population responsible for the flat cloud deck at longer wavelengths. We estimate that the atmospheric circulation is sufficiently strong to mix micron size particles upward to the required 1-10 mbar pressures, necessary to explain the cloud deck. These results further confirm the importance of clouds in hot-Jupiters, which can potentially dominate the overall spectra and may alter the abundances of key gaseous species.
  • Transit observations in the MgI line of HD209458b revealed signatures of neutral magnesium escaping the upper atmosphere of the planet, while no atmospheric absorption was found in the MgII doublet. Here we present a 3D particle model of the dynamics of neutral and ionized magnesium populations, coupled with an analytical modeling of the atmosphere below the exobase. Theoretical MgI absorption line profiles are directly compared with the absorption observed in the blue wing of the line during the planet transit. Observations are well-fitted with an escape rate of neutral magnesium in the range 2x10^7-3.4x10^7 g/s, an exobase close to the Roche lobe (Rexo in the range 2.1-4.3 Rp, where Rp is the planet radius) and a planetary wind velocity at the exobase vpl=25km/s. The observed velocities of the planet-escaping magnesium up to -60km/s are well explained by radiation pressure acceleration, provided that UV-photoionization is compensated for by electron recombination up to about 13Rp. If the exobase properties are constrained to values given by theoretical models of the deeper atmosphere (Rexo=2Rp and vpl=10km/s), the best fit to the observations is found at a similar electron density and escape rate within 2 sigma. In all cases, the mean temperature of the atmosphere below the exobase must be higher than about 6100 K. Simulations predict a redward expansion of the absorption profile from the beginning to the end of the transit. The spatial and spectral structure of the extended atmosphere is the result of complex interactions between radiation pressure, planetary gravity, and self-shielding, and can be probed through the analysis of transit absorption profiles in the MgI line.
  • We present narrow-band photometric measurements of the exoplanet GJ 1214b using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and the OSIRIS instrument. Using tuneable filters we observed a total of five transits, three of which were observed at two wavelengths nearly simultaneously, producing a total of eight individual light curves, six of these probed the possible existence of a methane absorption feature in the 8770 - 8850 {\AA} region at high resolution. We detect no increase in the planet-to-star radius ratio across the methane feature with a change in radius ratio of $\Delta$R = -0.0007 $\pm$ 0.0017 corresponding to a scale height (H) change of -0.5 $\pm$ 1.2 H across the methane feature, assuming a hydrogen dominated atmosphere. We find a variety of water and cloudy atmospheric models fit the data well, but find that cloud-free models provide poor fits. These observations support a flat transmission spectrum resulting from the presence of a high-altitude haze or a water-rich atmosphere, in agreement with previous studies. In this study the observations are predominantly limited by the photometric quality and the limited number of data points (resulting from a long observing cadence), which make the determination of the systematic noise challenging. With tuneable filters capable of high resolution measurements (R ~ 600 - 750) of narrow absorption features, the interpretation of our results are also limited by the absence of high resolution methane models below 1 $\mu$m.
  • We report new near ultraviolet HST/STIS observations of atmospheric absorptions during the planetary transit of HD209458b. We detect absorption in atomic magnesium (MgI), while no signal has been detected in the lines of singly ionized magnesium (MgII). We measure the MgI atmospheric absorption to be 6.2+/-2.9% in the velocity range from -62 to -19 km/s. The detection of atomic magnesium in the planetary upper atmosphere at a distance of several planetary radii gives a first view into the transition region between the thermosphere and the exobase, where atmospheric escape takes place. We estimate the electronic densities needed to compensate for the photo-ionization by dielectronic recombination of Mg+ to be in the range of 10^8-10^9 cm^{-3}. Our finding is in excellent agreement with model predictions at altitudes of several planetary radii. We observe MgI atoms escaping the planet, with a maximum radial velocity (in the stellar rest frame) of -60 km/s. Because magnesium is much heavier than hydrogen, the escape of this species confirms previous studies that the planet's atmosphere is undergoing hydrodynamic escape. We compare our observations to a numerical model that takes the stellar radiation pressure on the MgI atoms into account. We find that the MgI atoms must be present at up to ~7.5 planetari radii altitude and estimate an MgI escape rate of ~3x10^7 g/s. Compared to previous evaluations of the escape rate of HI atoms, this evaluation is compatible with a magnesium abundance roughly solar. A hint of absorption, detected at low level of significance, during the post-transit observations, could be interpreted as a MgI cometary-like tail. If true, the estimate of the absorption by MgI would be increased to a higher value of about 8.8+/-2.1%.
  • We present an optical to near-infrared transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-1b, based on HST observations, covering the spectral regime from 0.29 to 1.027{\mu}m with STIS, which is coupled with a recent WFC3 transit (1.087 to 1.687{\mu}m). We derive refined physical parameters of the HAT-P-1 system, including an improved orbital ephemeris. The transmission spectrum shows a strong absorption signature shortward of 0.55{\mu}m, with a strong blueward slope into the near-ultraviolet. We detect atmospheric sodium absorption at a 3.3{\sigma} significance level, but find no evidence for the potassium feature. The red data implies a marginally flat spectrum with a tentative absorption enhancement at wavelength longer than ~0.85{\mu}m. The STIS and WFC3 spectra differ significantly in absolute radius level (4.3 +/- 1.6 pressure scale heights), implying strong optical absorption in the atmosphere of HAT-P-1b. The optical to near-infrared difference cannot be explained by stellar activity, as simulta- neous stellar activity monitoring of the G0V HAT-P-1b host star and its identical companion show no significant activity that could explain the result. We compare the complete STIS and WFC3 transmission spectrum with theoretical atmospheric mod- els which include haze, sodium and an extra optical absorber. We find that both an optical absorber and a super-solar sodium to water abundance ratio might be a sce- nario explaining the HAT-P-1b observations. Our results suggest that strong optical absorbers may be a dominant atmospheric feature in some hot Jupiter exoplanets.
  • We present HST optical transmission spectra of the transiting hot Jupiter WASP-12b, taken with the STIS instrument. From the transmission spectra, we are able to decisively rule out prominent absorption by TiO in the exoplanet's atmosphere. Strong pressure-broadened Na and K absorption signatures are also excluded, as are significant metal-hydride features. We compare our combined broadband spectrum to a wide variety of existing aerosol-free atmospheric models, though none are satisfactory fits. However, we do find that the full transmission spectrum can be described by models which include significant opacity from aerosols: including Rayleigh scattering, Mie scattering, tholin haze, and settling dust profiles. The transmission spectrum follows an effective extinction cross section with a power-law of index alpha, with the slope of the transmission spectrum constraining the quantity alphaT = -3528+/-660 K, where T is the atmospheric temperature. Rayleigh scattering (alpha=-4) is among the best fitting models, though requires low terminator temperatures near 900 K. Sub-micron size aerosol particles can provide equally good fits to the entire transmission spectrum for a wide range of temperatures, and we explore corundum as a plausible dust aerosol. The presence of atmospheric aerosols also helps to explain the modestly bright albedo implied by Spitzer observations, as well as the near black body nature of the emission spectrum. Ti-bearing condensates on the cooler night-side is the most natural explanation for the overall lack of TiO signatures in WASP-12b, indicating the day/night cold-trap is an important effect for very hot Jupiters. These finding indicate that aerosols can play a significant atmospheric role for the entire wide range of hot-Jupiter atmospheres, potentially affecting their overall spectrum and energy balance.(abridged)
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared transmission spectroscopy of the transiting hot-Jupiter HAT-P-1b. We observed one transit with Wide Field Camera 3 using the G141 low-resolution grism to cover the wavelength range 1.087- 1.678 {\mu}m. These time series observations were taken with the newly available spatial scan mode that increases the duty cycle by nearly a factor of two, thus improving the resulting photometric precision of the data. We measure a planet-to-star radius ratio of Rp/R*=0.11709+/-0.00038 in the white light curve with the centre of transit occurring at 2456114.345+/-0.000133 (JD). We achieve S/N levels per exposure of 1840 (0.061%) at a resolution of {\Delta\lambda}=19.2nm (R~70) in the 1.1173 - 1.6549{\mu}m spectral region, providing the precision necessary to probe the transmission spectrum of the planet at close to the resolution limit of the instrument. We compute the transmission spectrum using both single target and differential photometry with similar results. The resultant transmission spectrum shows a significant absorption above the 5-{\sigma} level matching the 1.4{\mu}m water absorption band. In solar composition models, the water absorption is sensitive to the ~1 mbar pressure levels at the terminator. The detected absorption agrees with that predicted by an 1000 K isothermal model, as well as with that predicted by a planetary-averaged temperature model.
  • We measure the transmission spectrum of WASP-19b from 3 transits using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the HST Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The STIS spectra cover a wavelength range of 0.29-1.03 microns with resolving power R=500. The optical data are combined with archival near-IR data from the HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) G141 grism, covering the wavelength range 1.087-1.687 micron, with resolving power R=130. We obtain the transmission spectrum from 0.53-1.687 microns with S/N levels between 3000 and 11,000 in 0.1 micron bins. WASP-19 is a very active star, with optical stellar flux varying by a few per cent over time. We correct the transit light curves for the effects of stellar activity using ground-based activity monitoring with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). While we were not able to construct a transmission spectrum using the blue optical data due to the presence of large occulted star spots, we were able to use the spot crossings to help constrain the mean stellar spot temperature. To search for predicted features in the hot-Jupiter atmosphere, we also define spectral indices for differential radius measurements to specifically search for the presence of TiO and alkali line features. Our measurements rule out TiO features predicted for a planet of WASP-19b's equilibrium temperature (2050 K) in the transmission spectrum at the 2.7-2.9 sigma confidence level, depending on atmospheric model formalism. The WFC3 transmission spectrum shows strong absorption features due to the presence of H2O, which is detected at the 4 sigma confidence level between 1.1 and 1.4 microns. The results indicate that WASP-19b is a planet with no or low levels of TiO and without a high C/O ratio. The lack of observable TiO features are possibly due to rainout, breakdown from stellar activity or the presence of other absorbers in the optical.
  • We present two transits of the hot-Jupiter exoplanet XO-2b using the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The time series observations were performed using long-slit spectroscopy of XO-2 and a nearby reference star with the OSIRIS instrument, enabling differential specrophotometric transit lightcurves capable of measuring the exoplanet's transmission spectrum. Two optical low-resolution grisms were used to cover the optical wavelength range from 3800 to 9300{\AA}. We find that sub-mmag level slit losses between the target and reference star prevent full optical transmission spectra from being constructed, limiting our analysis to differential absorption depths over ~1000{\AA} regions. Wider long slits or multi-object grism spectroscopy with wide masks will likely prove effective in minimising the observed slit-loss trends. During both transits, we detect significant absorption in the planetary atmosphere of XO-2b using a 50{\AA} bandpass centred on the Na I doublet, with absorption depths of Delta(R_pl/R_star)^2=0.049+/-0.017 % using the R500R grism and 0.047+/-0.011 % using the R500B grism (combined 5.2-sigma significance from both transits). The sodium feature is unresolved in our low-resolution spectra, with detailed modelling also likely ruling out significant line-wing absorption over an ~800{\AA} region surrounding the doublet. Combined with narrowband photometric measurements, XO-2b is the first hot Jupiter with evidence for both sodium and potassium present in the planet's atmosphere.
  • Atmospheric escape has been detected from the exoplanet HD 209458b through transit observations of the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line. Here we present spectrally resolved Lyman-alpha transit observations of the exoplanet HD 189733b at two different epochs. These HST/STIS observations show for the first time, that there are significant temporal variations in the physical conditions of an evaporating planetary atmosphere. While atmospheric hydrogen is not detected in the first epoch observations, it is observed at the second epoch, producing a transit absorption depth of 14.4+/-3.6% between velocities of -230 to -140 km/s. Contrary to HD 209458b, these high velocities cannot arise from radiation pressure alone and require an additional acceleration mechanism, such as interactions with stellar wind protons. The observed absorption can be explained by an atmospheric escape rate of neutral hydrogen atoms of about 10^9 g/s, a stellar wind with a velocity of 190 km/s and a temperature of ~10^5K. An X-ray flare from the active star seen with Swift/XRT 8 hours before the second-epoch observation supports the idea that the observed changes within the upper atmosphere of the planet can be caused by variations in the stellar wind properties, or by variations in the stellar energy input to the planetary escaping gas (or a mix of the two effects). These observations provide the first indication of interaction between the exoplanet's atmosphere and stellar variations.
  • An error was detected in the code used for the analysis of the HD209458b sodium profile (Vidal-Madjar et al. 2011). Here we present an updated T-P profile and briefly discuss the consequences.
  • We observed with the SOPHIE spectrograph (OHP, France) the transit of the HAT-P-6b exoplanet across its host star. The resulting stellar radial velocities display the Rossiter-McLaughlin anomaly and reveal a retrograde orbit: the planetary orbital spin and the stellar rotational spin point towards approximately opposite directions. A fit to the anomaly measures a sky-projected angle lambda = 166 +/- 10 degrees between these two spin axes. All seven known retrograde planets are hot jupiters with masses M_p < 3 M_Jup. About two thirds of the planets in this mass range however are prograde and aligned (lambda ~ 0). By contrast, most of the more massive planets (M_p > 4 M_Jup) are prograde but misaligned. Different mechanisms may therefore be responsible for planetary obliquities above and below ~3.5 M_Jup.
  • A complete reassessment of the HST observations of the transits of the extrasolar planet HD209458b has provided a transmission spectrum of the atmosphere over a wide range of wavelengths. Analysis of the NaI absorption line profile has already shown that the sodium abundance has to drop by at least a factor of ten above a critical altitude. Here we analyze the profile in the deep core of the NaI doublet line from HST and high-resolution ground-based spectra to further constrain the vertical structure of the HD209458b atmosphere. With a wavelength-dependent cross section that spans more than 5 orders of magnitude, we use the absorption signature of the NaI doublet as an atmospheric probe. The NaI transmission features are shown to sample the atmosphere of HD209458b over an altitude range of more than 6500km, corresponding to a pressure range of 14 scale heights spanning 1 millibar to 1e-9 bar pressures. By comparing the observations with a multi-layer model in which temperature is a free parameter at the resolution of the atmospheric scale height, we constrain the temperature vertical profile and variations in the Na abundance in the upper part of the atmosphere of HD209458b. We find a rise in temperature above the drop in sodium abundance at the 3mbar level. We also identify an isothermal atmospheric layer at 1500+/-100K spanning almost 6 scale heights in altitude, from 1e-5 to 1e-7 bar. Above this layer, the temperature rises again to 2500(+1500/-1000)K at 1e-9 bar, indicating the presence of a thermosphere. The resulting temperature-pressure (T-P) profile agrees with the Na condensation scenario at the 3 mbar level, with a possible signature of sodium ionization at higher altitudes, near the 3e-5 bar level. Our T-P profile is found to be in good agreement with the profiles obtained with aeronomical models including hydrodynamic escape.
  • We present Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) optical transit narrow-band photometry of the hot-Jupiter exoplanet XO-2b using the OSIRIS instrument. This unique instrument has the capabilities to deliver high cadence narrow-band photometric lightcurves, allowing us to probe the atmospheric composition of hot Jupiters from the ground. The observations were taken during three transit events which cover four wavelengths at spectral resolutions near 500, necessary for observing atmospheric features, and have near-photon limited sub-mmag precisions. Precision narrow-band photometry on a large aperture telescope allows for atmospheric transmission spectral features to be observed for exoplanets around much fainter stars than those of the well studied targets HD209458b and HD189733b, providing access to the majority of known transiting planets. For XO-2b, we measure planet-to-star radius contrasts of R_pl/R_star=0.10508+/-0.00052 at 6792 Ang, 0.10640+/-0.00058 at 7582 Ang, and 0.10686+/-0.00060 at 7664.9 Ang, and 0.10362+/-0.00051 at 8839 Ang. These measurements reveal significant spectral features at two wavelengths, with an absorption level of 0.067+/-0.016% at 7664.9 Ang due to atmospheric potassium in the line core (a 4.1-sigma significance level), and an absorption level of 0.058+/-0.016% at 7582 Ang, (a 3.6-sigma significance level). When comparing our measurements to hot-Jupiter atmospheric models, we find good agreement with models which are dominated in the optical by alkali metals. This is the first evidence for potassium in an extrasolar planet, an element that has long been theorized along with sodium to be a dominant source of opacity at optical wavelengths for hot Jupiters.
  • We present a new primary transit observation of the hot-jupiter HD189733b, obtained at 3.6 microns with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. Previous measurements at 3.6 microns suffered from strong systematics and conclusions could hardly be obtained with confidence on the water detection by comparison of the 3.6 and 5.8 microns observations. We use a high S/N Spitzer photometric transit light curve to improve the precision of the near infrared radius of the planet at 3.6 microns. The observation has been performed using high-cadence time series integrated in the subarray mode. We are able to derive accurate system parameters, including planet-to-star radius ratio, impact parameter, scale of the system, and central time of the transit from the fits of the transit light curve. We compare the results with transmission spectroscopic models and with results from previous observations at the same wavelength. We obtained the following system parameters: R_p/R_\star=0.15566+0.00011-0.00024, b=0.661+0.0053-0.0050, and a/R_\star=8.925+0.0490-0.0523 at 3.6 microns. These measurements are three times more accurate than previous studies at this wavelength because they benefit from greater observational efficiency and less statistic and systematic errors. Nonetheless, we find that the radius ratio has to be corrected for stellar activity and present a method to do so using ground-based long-duration photometric follow-up in the V-band. The resulting planet-to-star radius ratio corrected for the stellar variability is in agreement with the previous measurement obtained in the same bandpass (Desert et al. 2009). We also discuss that water vapour could not be evidenced by comparison of the planetary radius measured at 3.6 and 5.8 microns, because the radius measured at 3.6 microns is affected by absorption by other species, possibly Rayleigh scattering by haze.
  • We report the detection of a Jupiter-mass planet discovered with the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.93-m telescope at the Haute-Provence Observatory. The new planet orbits HD109246, a G0V star slightly more metallic than the Sun. HD109246b has a minimum mass of 0.77 MJup, an orbital period of 68 days, and an eccentricity of 0.12. It is placed in a sparsely populated region of the period distribution of extrasolar planets. We also present a correction method for the so-called seeing effect that affects the SOPHIE radial velocities. We complement this discovery announcement with a description of some calibrations that are implemented in the SOPHIE automatic reduction pipeline. These calibrations allow the derivation of the photon-noise radial velocity uncertainty and some useful stellar properties (vsini, [Fe/H], logR'HK) directly from the SOPHIE data.
  • We present new observations of a transit of the 111-day-period exoplanet HD80606b. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope and its IRAC camera on the post-cryogenic mission, we performed a 19-hour-long photometric observation of HD80606 that covers the full transit of 13-14 January 2010. We complement this photometric data by new spectroscopic observations that we simultaneously performed with SOPHIE at Haute-Provence Observatory. This provides radial velocity measurements of the first half of the transit that was previously uncovered with spectroscopy. This new data set allows the parameters of this singular planetary system to be significantly refined. We obtained a planet-to-star radius ratio R_p/R_* = 0.1001 +/- 0.0006 that is slightly lower than the one measured from previous ground observations. We detected a feature in the Spitzer light curve that could be due to a stellar spot. We also found a transit timing about 20 minutes earlier than the ephemeris prediction; this could be caused by actual TTVs due to an additional body in the system or by underestimated systematic uncertainties. The sky-projected angle between the spin-axis of HD80606 and the normal to the planetary orbital plane is found to be lambda = 42 +/- 8 degrees thanks to the fit of the Rossiter-McLaughlin anomaly. This allows scenarios with aligned spin-orbit to be definitively rejected. Over the twenty planetary systems with measured spin-orbit angles, a few of them are misaligned; this is probably the signature of two different evolution scenarios for misaligned and aligned systems, depending if they experienced or not gravitational interaction with a third body. As in the case of HD80606b, most of the planetary systems including a massive planet are tilted; this could be the signature of a separate evolution scenario for massive planets in comparison with Jupiter-mass planets.
  • We observed three transits of the extrasolar planet HD189733b in HI Lyman-alpha and in a few other lines in the ultraviolet with HST/ACS, in the search for atmospheric signatures. We detect a transit signature in the Lyman-alpha light curve with a transit depth of 5.05 +/- 0.75 %. This depth exceeds the occultation depth produced by the planetary disk alone at the 3.5-sigma level (statistical). Other stellar emission lines are less bright, and, taken individually, they do not show the transit signature, while the whole spectra redward of the Lyman-alpha line has enough photons to show a transit signature consistent with the absorption by the planetary disk alone. The transit depth's upper limits in the emission lines are 11.1% for OI at 1305A and 5.5% for CII at 1335A. The presence of an extended exosphere of atomic hydrogen around HD189733b producing 5% absorption of the full unresolved Lyman-alpha line flux shows that the planet is losing gas. The Lyman-alpha light curve is well-fitted by a numerical simulation of escaping hydrogen in which the planetary atoms are pushed by the stellar radiation pressure. We constrain the escape rate of atomic hydrogen to be between 10^9 and 10^{11} g/s and the ionizing extreme UV flux between 2 and 40 times the solar value (1-sigma), with larger escape rates corresponding to larger EUV flux. The best fit is obtained for dM/dt=10^{10} g/s and an EUV flux F_{EUV}=20 times the solar value. HD189733b is the second extrasolar planet for which atmospheric evaporation has been detected.
  • We report the discovery of a planetary system around HD9446, performed from radial velocity measurements secured with the spectrograph SOPHIE at the 193-cm telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory during more than two years. At least two planets orbit this G5V, active star: HD9446b has a minimum mass of 0.7 M_Jup and a slightly eccentric orbit with a period of 30 days, whereas HD9446c has a minimum mass of 1.8 M_Jup and a circular orbit with a period of 193 days. As for most of the known multi-planet systems, the HD9446-system presents a hierarchical disposition, with a massive outer planet and a lighter inner planet.