• We describe a technique for probing the statistical properties of cosmic magnetic fields based on radio polarimetry data. Second-order magnetic field statistics like the power spectrum cannot always distinguish between magnetic fields with essentially different spatial structure. Synchrotron polarimetry naturally allows certain 4th-order magnetic field statistics to be inferred from observational data, which lifts this degeneracy and can thereby help us gain a better picture of the structure of the cosmic fields and test theoretical scenarios describing magnetic turbulence. In this work we show that a 4th-order correlator of physical interest, the tension-force spectrum, can be recovered from the polarized synchrotron emission data. We develop an estimator for this quantity based on polarized-emission observations in the Faraday-rotation-free frequency regime. We consider two cases: a statistically isotropic field distribution, and a statistically isotropic field superimposed on a weak mean field. In both cases the tension force power spectrum is measurable; in the latter case, the magnetic power spectrum may also be obtainable. The method is exact in the idealized case of a homogeneous relativistic-electron distribution that has a power-law energy spectrum with a spectral index p=3, and assumes statistical isotropy of the turbulent field. We carry out tests of our method using synthetic data generated from numerically simulated magnetic fields. We show that the method is valid, that it is not prohibitively sensitive to the value of the electron spectral index, and that the observed tension-force spectrum allows one to distinguish between, e.g., a randomly tangled magnetic field (a default assumption in many studies) and a field organized in folded flux sheets or filaments.
  • We report on our knowledge of Galactic foregrounds, as well as on how a CMB satellite mission aiming at detecting a primordial B-mode signal (CMBPol) will contribute to improving it. We review the observational and analysis techniques used to constrain the structure of the Galactic magnetic field, whose presence is responsible for the polarization of Galactic emissions. Although our current understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium is somewhat limited, dramatic improvements in our knowledge of its properties are expected by the time CMBPol flies. Thanks to high resolution and high sensitivity instruments observing the whole sky at frequencies between 30 GHz and 850 GHz, CMBPol will not only improve this picture by observing the synchrotron emission from our galaxy, but also help constrain dust models. Polarized emission from interstellar dust indeed dominates over any other signal in CMBPol's highest frequency channels. Observations at these wavelengths, combined with ground-based studies of starlight polarization, will therefore enable us to improve our understanding of dust properties and of the mechanism(s) responsible for the alignment of dust grains with the Galactic magnetic field. CMBPol will also shed new light on observations that are presently not well understood. Morphological studies of anomalous dust and synchrotron emissions will indeed constrain their natures and properties, while searching for fluctuations in the emission from heliospheric dust will test our understanding of the circumheliospheric interstellar medium. Finally, acquiring more information on the properties of extra-Galactic sources will be necessary in order to maximize the cosmological constraints extracted from CMBPol's observations of CMB lensing. (abridged)
  • We present a publicly available code called Hammurabi for generating mock polarized observations of Galactic synchrotron emission for telescopes like LOFAR, SKA, Planck and WMAP, based on model inputs for the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), the cosmic-ray density distribution and the thermal electron density. We also present mock UHECR deflection measure (UDM) maps based on model inputs for the GMF. In future, when UHECR sources are identified, this will allow us to define UDM as a GMF probe in a similar way as polarized radio sources permit us to define rotation measures. To demonstrate the code's abilities mock observations are compared to real data as a means to constrain the input parameters of our simulations with a focus on large-scale magnetic field properties. As expected, attempts at trying to model the synchrotron, UHECR deflection and RM input parameters, show that any additional observational data set greatly increases the constraints on the models. The hammurabi code addresses this by allowing to perform simulations of several different data sets simultaneously, providing the means for a more reliable constraint of the magnetized inter-stellar-medium.
  • (Abridged) We constrain simulated all-sky maps in total intensity, linear polarization, and rotation measure (RM) by observations. We test a number of large-scale magnetic field configurations and take the properties of the warm interstellar medium into account. From a comparison of simulated and observed maps we are able to constrain the regular large-scale Galactic magnetic field in the disk and the halo of the Galaxy. The local regular field is 2 microG and the average random field is about 3 microG. The known local excess of synchrotron emission originating either from enhanced CR electrons or random magnetic fields is able to explain the observed high-latitude synchrotron emission. The thermal electron model (NE2001) in conjunction with a proper filling factor accounts for the observed optically thin thermal emission and low frequency absorption by optically thick emission. A coupling factor between thermal electrons and the random magnetic field component is proposed, which in addition to the small filling factor of thermal electrons increases small-scale RM fluctuations and thus accounts for the observed depolarization at 1.4 GHz. We conclude that an axisymmetric magnetic disk field configuration with reversals inside the solar circle fits available observations best. Out of the plane a strong toroidal magnetic field with different signs above and below the plane is needed to account for the observed high-latitude RMs. Our preferred 3D-model fits the observations better than other models over a wide frequency range.