• We present a study of the dust, stars and atomic gas (HI) in an HI-selected sample of local galaxies (z<0.035) in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) fields. This HI-selected sample reveals a population of very high gas fraction (>80 per cent), low stellar mass sources that appear to be in the earliest stages of their evolution. We compare this sample with dust and stellar mass selected samples to study the dust and gas scaling relations over a wide range of gas fraction (proxy for evolutionary state of a galaxy). The most robust scaling relations for gas and dust are those linked to NUV-r (SSFR) and gas fraction, these do not depend on sample selection or environment. At the highest gas fractions, our additional sample shows the dust content is well below expectations from extrapolating scaling relations for more evolved sources, and dust is not a good tracer of the gas content. The specific dust mass for local galaxies peaks at a gas fraction of ~75 per cent. The atomic gas depletion time is also longer for high gas fraction galaxies, opposite to the trend found for molecular gas depletion timescale. We link this trend to the changing efficiency of conversion of HI to H2 as galaxies increase in stellar mass surface density as they evolve. Finally, we show that galaxies start out barely obscured and increase in obscuration as they evolve, yet there is no clear and simple link between obscuration and global galaxy properties.
  • We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalisation, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric dataset from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the datasets. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR dataset. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey furnishes a deep redshift catalog that, when combined with the Wide-field Infrared Explorer ($WISE$), allows us to explore for the first time the mid-infrared properties of $> 110, 000$ galaxies over 120 deg$^2$ to $z\simeq 0.5$. In this paper we detail the procedure for producing the matched GAMA-$WISE$ catalog for the G12 and G15 fields, in particular characterising and measuring resolved sources; the complete catalogs for all three GAMA equatorial fields will be made available through the GAMA public releases. The wealth of multiwavelength photometry and optical spectroscopy allows us to explore empirical relations between optically determined stellar mass (derived from synthetic stellar population models) and 3.4micron and 4.6micron WISE measurements. Similarly dust-corrected Halpha-derived star formation rates can be compared to 12micron and 22micron luminosities to quantify correlations that can be applied to large samples to $z<0.5$. To illustrate the applications of these relations, we use the 12micron star formation prescription to investigate the behavior of specific star formation within the GAMA-WISE sample and underscore the ability of WISE to detect star-forming systems at $z\sim0.5$. Within galaxy groups (determined by a sophisticated friends-of-friends scheme), results suggest that galaxies with a neighbor within 100$\,h^{-1} $kpc have, on average, lower specific star formation rates than typical GAMA galaxies with the same stellar mass.
  • In this work we investigate in detail the effects local environment (groups and pairs) has on galaxies with stellar mass similar to the Milky-Way (L* galaxies). A volume limited sample of 6,150 galaxies is classified to determine emission features, morphological type and presence of a disk. This sample allows for characteristics of galaxies to be isolated (e.g. stellar mass and group halo mass), and their codependencies determined. We observe that galaxy-galaxy interactions play the most important role in shaping the evolution within a group halo, the main role of halo mass is in gathering the galaxies together to encourage such interactions. Dominant pair galaxies find their overall star formation enhanced when the pair's mass ratio is close to 1, otherwise we observe the same galaxies as we would in an unpaired system. The minor galaxy in a pair is greatly affected by its companion galaxy, and whilst the star forming fraction is always suppressed relative to equivalent stellar mass unpaired galaxies, it becomes lower still when the mass ratio of a pair system increases. We find that, in general, the close galaxy-galaxy interaction rate drops as a function of halo mass for a given amount of stellar mass. We find evidence of a local peak of interactions for Milky-Way stellar mass galaxies in Milky-Way halo mass groups. Low mass halos, and in particular Local Group mass halos, are an important environment for understanding the typical evolutionary path of a unit of stellar mass. We find compelling evidence for galaxy conformity in both groups and pairs, where morphological type conformity is dominant in groups, and emission class conformity is dominant in pairs. This suggests that group scale conformity is the result of many galaxy encounters over an extended period of time, whilst pair conformity is a fairly instantaneous response to a transitory interaction.
  • Analysing all Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) galaxies within a factor two (+/- 0.3 dex) of the stellar mass of the Milky Way (MW), there is a 11.9% chance that one of these galaxies will have a close companion (within a projected separation of 70 kpc and radial separation of 400 km/s) that is at least as massive as the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Two close companions at least as massive as the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are rare at the 3.4% level. Two full analogues to the MW- LMC-SMC system were found in GAMA (all galaxies late-type and star forming), suggesting such a combination of close together, late-type, star-forming galaxies is rare: only 0.4% of MW mass galaxies (in the range where we could observe both the LMC and SMC) have such a system. In summary, the MW-LMC-SMC system is a 2.7? event (when recast into Gaussian statistics). Using cross-correlation comparisons we find that there is a preference for SMC- LMC binary pair analogues to be located within 2 Mpc of a range of different lumi- nosity groups. There is a particular preference is for such binaries to be located near LG luminosity systems. When these groups are subdivided into small magnitude gap and large magnitude gap subsets, the binaries prefer to be spatially associated with the small magnitude gap systems. These systems will be dynamically less evolved, but still offer the same amount of gravitational dark matter. This suggests that binaries such as the SMC-LMC might be transient systems, usually destroyed during vigorous merger events. Details of a particularly striking analogue to the MW-SMC-LMC and M31 complex are included.
  • We present the details and early results from a deep near-infrared survey utilising the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope centred around massive M_* > 10^11 M_0 galaxies at 1.7 < z < 2.9 found within the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. The GOODS NICMOS Survey (GNS) was designed to obtain deep F160W (H-band) imaging of 80 of these massive galaxies, as well as other colour selected objects such as Lyman-break drop-outs, BzK objects, Distant Red Galaxies, EROs, Spitzer Selected EROs, BX/BM galaxies, as well as sub-mm galaxies. We present in this paper details of the observations, our sample selection, as well as a description of features of the massive galaxies found within our survey fields. This includes: photometric redshifts, rest-frame colours, and stellar masses. We furthermore provide an analysis of the selection methods for finding massive galaxies at high redshifts, including colour selection, and how galaxy populations selected through different methods overlap. We find that a single colour selection method cannot locate all of the massive galaxies, with no one method finding more than 70 percent. We however find that the combination of these colour methods finds nearly all the massive galaxies, as selected by photometric redshifts with the exception of apparently rare blue massive galaxies. By investigating the rest-frame (U-B) vs. M_B diagram for these galaxies we furthermore show that there exists a bimodality in colour-magnitude space at z < 2, driven by stellar mass, such that the most massive galaxies are systematically red up to z~2.5, while lower mass galaxies tend to be blue. We also discuss the number densities for galaxies with stellar masses M_* > 10^11 M_0, whereby we find an increase of a factor of eight between z = 3 and z = 1.5, demonstrating that this is an epoch when massive galaxies establish most of their mass.