• We demonstrate that a weakly disordered metal with short-range interactions exhibits a transition in the quantum chaotic dynamics when changing the temperature or the interaction strength. For weak interactions, the system displays exponential growth of the out-of-time-ordered correlator (OTOC) of the current operator. The Lyapunov exponent of this growth is temperature-independent in the limit of vanishing interaction. With increasing the temperature or the interaction strength, the system undergoes a transition to a non-chaotic behaviour, for which the exponential growth of the OTOC is absent. We conjecture that the transition manifests itself in the quasiparticle energy-level statistics and also discuss ways of its explicit observation in cold-atom setups.
  • We study out-of-time order correlators (OTOCs) of the form $\langle\hat A(t)\hat B(0)\hat C(t)\hat D(0)\rangle$ for a quantum system weakly coupled to a dissipative environment. Such an open system may serve as a model of, e.g., a small region in a disordered interacting medium coupled to the rest of this medium considered as an environment. We demonstrate that for a system with discrete energy levels the OTOC saturates exponentially $\propto \sum a_i e^{-t/\tau_i}+const$ to a constant value at $t\rightarrow\infty$, in contrast with quantum-chaotic systems which exhibit exponential growth of OTOCs. Focussing on the case of a two-level system, we calculate microscopically the decay times $\tau_i$ and the value of the saturation constant. Because some OTOCs are immune to dephasing processes and some are not, such correlators may decay on two sets of parametrically different time scales related to inelastic transitions between the system levels and to pure dephasing processes, respectively. In the case of a classical environment, the evolution of the OTOC can be mapped onto the evolution of the density matrix of two systems coupled to the same dissipative environment.
  • Fragment separator ACCULINNA-2 has been built in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear reactions (JINR, Dubna). It is timely now to choose meaningful and challenging objectives for experiments dedicated to the study of light drip-line nuclei. Considerable interest makes the search for the minor $2p$-decay branch of the first excited state of $^{17}$Ne. The knowledge on the $\Gamma_{2p}/\Gamma_{\gamma}$ width ratio for this excited state is of considerable interest because the reverse process of simultaneous two-proton radiative capture could be a bypass for the $^{15}$O "waiting point" occurring in the rp-process of nucleosynthesis. Accumulation of high-statistics data for the $^{10}$He excitation spectrum populated in the $^2$H($^8$He,$p$)$^9$He and $^3$H($^8$He,$p$)$^{10}$He reactions, as well as the study of cross-check reactions made with the $^{11}$Li and $^{14}$Be beams, will make an effective way to clarify the succession of $^{10}$He excited states. A hot topic beyond the neutron drip line makes the observation of results capable to elucidate the low-energy resonance states anticipated for the $4n$ decay of $^{7}$H. The RIB beams provided by ACCULINNA-2 will allow one to perform experiments where luminosity coming to a level of more than $2 \times 10^{26}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ will be achievable in experiments aimed study of the $^2$H($^8$He,$^3$He)$^7$H and $^2$H($^{11}$Li,$^6$Li)$^7$H reactions.
  • Nuclear track emulsion is exposed to a beam of radioactive $^8$He nuclei with an energy of 60 MeV and enrichment of about 80% at the ACCULINNA separator. Measurements of 278 decays of the $^8$He nuclei stopped in the emulsion allow the potential of the $\alpha$ spectrometry to be estimated and the thermal drift of $^8$He atoms in matter to be observed for the first time.
  • We provide a theoretical framework describing slow-light polaritons interacting via atomic Rydberg states. We use a diagrammatic method to analytically derive the scattering properties of two polaritons. We identify parameter regimes where polariton-polariton interactions are repulsive. Furthermore, in the regime of attractive interactions, we identify multiple two-polariton bound states, calculate their dispersion, and study the resulting scattering resonances. Finally, the two-particle scattering properties allow us to derive the effective low-energy many-body Hamiltonian. This theoretical platform is applicable to ongoing experiments.
  • We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA 87Sr and NIST 171Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems.
  • Unknown isotope 26S, expected to decay by two-proton (2p) emission, was studied theoretically and was searched experimentally. The structure of this nucleus was examined within the relativistic mean field (RMF) approach. A method for taking into account the many-body structure in the three-body decay calculations was developed. The results of the RMF calculations were used as an input for the three-cluster decay model worked out to study a possible 2p decay branch of this nucleus. The experimental search for 26S was performed in fragmentation reactions of a 50.3 A MeV 32S beam. No events of 26S or 25P (a presumably proton-unstable subsystem of 26S) were observed. Based on the obtained production systematics an upper half-life limit of T_{1/2}<79 ns was established from the time-of-flight through the fragment separator. Together with the theoretical lifetime estimates for two-proton decay this gives a decay energy limit of Q_{2p}>640 keV for 26S. Analogous limits for 25P are found as T_{1/2}<38 ns and Q_{p}>110 keV. In the case that the one-proton emission is the main branch of the 26S decay a limit Q_{2p}>230 keV would follow for this nucleus. It is likely that 26S resides in the picosecond lifetime range and the further search for this isotope is prospective for the decay-in-flight technique.
  • We present a preliminary experimental study of the dependence on optical depth of slow and stored light pulses in Rb vapor. In particular, we characterize the efficiency of slow and stored light as a function of Rb density; pulse duration, delay and storage time; and control field intensity. Experimental results are in good qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations based on a simplified three-level model at moderate densities.
  • The spectrum of $^9$He was studied by means of the $^8$He($d$,$p$)$^9$He reaction at a lab energy of 25 MeV/n and small center of mass (c.m.) angles. Energy and angular correlations were obtained for the $^9$He decay products by complete kinematical reconstruction. The data do not show narrow states at $\sim $1.3 and $\sim $2.4 MeV reported before for $^9$He. The lowest resonant state of $^9$He is found at about 2 MeV with a width of $\sim $2 MeV and is identified as $1/2^-$. The observed angular correlation pattern is uniquely explained by the interference of the $1/2^-$ resonance with a virtual state $1/2^+$ (limit on the scattering length is obtained as $a > -20$ fm), and with the $5/2^+$ resonance at energy $\geq 4.2$ MeV.