• We develop a helioseismic inversion algorithm that can be used to recover sub-surface vertical profiles of 2-dimensional supergranular flows from surface measurements of synthetic wave travel times. We carry out seismic wave-propagation simulations through a 2-dimensional section of a flow profile that resembles an averaged supergranule, and a starting model that has flows only at the surface. We assume that the wave measurements are entirely without realization noise for the purpose of our test. We expand the vertical profile of the supergranule stream function on a basis of B-splines. We iteratively update the B-spline coefficients of the supergranule model to reduce the travel-times differences observed between the two simulations. We carry out the exercise for four different vertical profiles peaking at different depths below the solar surface. We are able to accurately recover depth profiles of four supergranule models at depths up to $8-10\,\text{Mm}$ below the solar surface using $f-p_4$ modes, under the assumption that there is no realization noise. We are able to obtain the peak depth and the depth of the return flow for each model. A basis-resolved inversion performs significantly better than one where the flow field is inverted for at each point in the radial grid. This is an encouraging result and might act as a guide in developing more realistic inversion strategies that can be applied to supergranular flows in the Sun.
  • Context. In time-distance helioseismology, wave travel times are measured from the two-point cross-covariance function of solar oscillations and are used to image the solar convection zone in three dimensions. There is, however, also information in the amplitude of the cross-covariance function, for example about seismic wave attenuation. Aims. Here we develop a convenient procedure to measure the amplitude of the cross-covariance function of solar oscillations. Methods. In this procedure, the amplitude of the cross-covariance function is linearly related to the cross-covariance function and can be measured even for high levels of noise. Results. As an example application, we measure the amplitude perturbations of the seismic waves that propagate through the sunspot in active region NOAA 9787. We can recover the amplitude variations due to the scattering and attenuation of the waves by the sunspot and associated finite-wavelength effects. Conclusions. The proposed definition of cross-covariance amplitude is robust to noise, can be used to relate measured amplitudes to 3D perturbations in the solar interior under the Born approximation, and will provide independent information from the travel times.
  • Stars are not perfectly spherically symmetric. They are deformed by rotation and magnetic fields. Until now, the study of stellar shapes has only been possible with optical interferometry for a few of the fastest-rotating nearby stars. We report an asteroseismic measurement, with much better precision than interferometry, of the asphericity of an A-type star with a rotation period of 100 days. Using the fact that different modes of oscillation probe different stellar latitudes, we infer a tiny but significant flattening of the star's shape of $\Delta R/R = (1.8 \pm 0.6) \times 10^{-6}$. For a stellar radius $R$ that is $2.24$ times the solar radius, the difference in radius between the equator and the poles is $\Delta R = 3 \pm 1$ km. Because the observed $\Delta R/R$ is only one-third of the expected rotational oblateness, we conjecture the presence of a weak magnetic field on a star that does not have an extended convective envelope. This calls to question the origin of the magnetic field.
  • Local helioseismology has so far relied on semi-analytical methods to compute the spatial sensitivity of wave travel times to perturbations in the solar interior. These methods are cumbersome and lack flexibility. Here we propose a convenient framework for numerically solving the forward problem of time-distance helioseismology in the frequency domain. The fundamental quantity to be computed is the cross-covariance of the seismic wavefield. We choose sources of wave excitation that enable us to relate the cross-covariance of the oscillations to the Green's function in a straightforward manner. We illustrate the method by considering the 3D acoustic wave equation in an axisymmetric reference solar model, ignoring the effects of gravity on the waves. The symmetry of the background model around the rotation axis implies that the Green's function can be written as a sum of longitudinal Fourier modes, leading to a set of independent 2D problems. We use a high-order finite-element method to solve the 2D wave equation in frequency space. The computation is `embarrassingly parallel', with each frequency and each azimuthal order solved independently on a computer cluster. We compute travel-time sensitivity kernels in spherical geometry for flows, sound speed, and density perturbations under the first Born approximation. Convergence tests show that travel times can be computed with a numerical precision better than one millisecond, as required by the most precise travel-time measurements. The method presented here is computationally efficient and will be used to interpret travel-time measurements in order to infer, e.g., the large-scale meridional flow in the solar convection zone. It allows the implementation of (full-waveform) iterative inversions, whereby the axisymmetric background model is updated at each iteration.
  • Magnetic field emerges at the surface of the Sun as sunspots and active regions. This process generates a poloidal magnetic field from a rising toroidal flux tube, it is a crucial but poorly understood aspect of the solar dynamo. The emergence of magnetic field is also important because it is a key driver of solar activity. We show that measurements of horizontal flows at the solar surface around emerging active regions, in combination with numerical simulations of solar magnetoconvection, can constrain the subsurface rise speed of emerging magnetic flux. The observed flows imply that the rise speed of the magnetic field is no larger than 150 m/s at a depth of 20 Mm, that is, well below the prediction of the (standard) thin flux tube model but in the range expected for convective velocities at this depth. We conclude that convective flows control the dynamics of rising flux tubes in the upper layers of the Sun and cannot be neglected in models of flux emergence.
  • Context: The cross-covariance of solar oscillations observed at pairs of points on the solar surface is a fundamental ingredient in time-distance helioseismology. Wave travel times are extracted from the cross-covariance function and are used to infer the physical conditions in the solar interior. Aims: Understanding the statistics of the two-point cross-covariance function is a necessary step towards optimizing the measurement of travel times. Methods: By modeling stochastic solar oscillations, we evaluate the variance of the cross-covariance function as function of time-lag and distance between the two points. Results: We show that the variance of the cross-covariance is independent of both time-lag and distance in the far field, i.e., when they are large compared to the coherence scales of the solar oscillations. Conclusions: The constant noise level for the cross-covariance means that the signal-to-noise ratio for the cross-covariance is proportional to the amplitude of the expectation value of the cross-covariance. This observation is important for planning data analysis efforts.
  • We extend an existing Born approximation method for calculating the linear sensitivity of helioseismic travel times to flows from Cartesian to spherical geometry. This development is necessary for using the Born approximation for inferring large-scale flows in the deep solar interior. In a first sanity check, we compare two $f-$mode kernels from our spherical method and from an existing Cartesian method. The horizontal and total integrals agree to within 0.3 %. As a second consistency test, we consider a uniformly rotating Sun and a travel distance of 42 degrees. The analytical travel-time difference agrees with the forward-modelled travel-time difference to within 2 %. In addition, we evaluate the impact of different choices of filter functions on the kernels for a meridional travel distance of 42 degrees. For all filters, the sensitivity is found to be distributed over a large fraction of the convection zone. We show that the kernels depend on the filter function employed in the data analysis process. If modes of higher harmonic degree ($90\lesssim l \lesssim 170$) are permitted, a noisy pattern of a spatial scale corresponding to $l\approx 260$ appears near the surface. When mainly low-degree modes are used ($l\lesssim70$), the sensitivity is concentrated in the deepest regions and it visually resembles a ray-path-like structure. Among the different low-degree filters used, we find the kernel for phase-speed filtered measurements to be best localized in depth.
  • Context. Several upcoming and proposed space missions, such as Solar Orbiter, will be limited in telemetry and thus require data compression. Aims. We test the impact of data compression on local correlation tracking (LCT) of time-series of continuum intensity images. We evaluate the effect of several lossy compression methods (quantization, JPEG compression, and a reduced number of continuum images) on measurements of solar differential rotation with LCT. Methods. We apply the different compression methods to tracked and remapped continuum intensity maps obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We derive 2D vector velocities using the local correlation tracking code FLCT and determine the additional bias and noise introduced by compression to differential rotation. Results. We find that probing differential rotation with LCT is very robust to lossy data compression when using quantization. Our results are severely affected by systematic errors of the LCT method and the HMI instrument. The sensitivity of LCT to systematic errors is a concern for Solar Orbiter.
  • Time-distance helioseismology uses cross-covariances of wave motions on the solar surface to determine the travel times of wave packets moving from one surface location to another. We review the methodology to interpret travel-time measurements in terms of small, localized perturbations to a horizontally homogeneous reference solar model. Using the first Born approximation, we derive and compute 3D travel-time sensitivity (Fr\'echet) kernels for perturbations in sound-speed, density, pressure, and vector flows. While kernels for sound speed and flows had been computed previously, here we extend the calculation to kernels for density and pressure, hence providing a complete description of the effects of solar dynamics and structure on travel times. We treat three thermodynamic quantities as independent and do not assume hydrostatic equilibrium. We present a convenient approach to computing damped Green's functions using a normal-mode summation. The Green's function must be computed on a wavenumber grid that has sufficient resolution to resolve the longest lived modes. The typical kernel calculations used in this paper are computer intensive and require on the order of 600 CPU hours per kernel. Kernels are validated by computing the travel-time perturbation that results from horizontally-invariant perturbations using two independent approaches. At fixed sound-speed, the density and pressure kernels are approximately related through a negative multiplicative factor, therefore implying that perturbations in density and pressure are difficult to disentangle. Mean travel-times are not only sensitive to sound-speed, density and pressure perturbations, but also to flows, especially vertical flows. Accurate sensitivity kernels are needed to interpret complex flow patterns such as convection.
  • Time-distance helioseismology provides information about vector flows in the near-surface layers of the Sun by measuring wave travel times between points on the solar surface. Specific spatial averages of travel times have been proposed for distinguishing between flows in the east-west and north-south directions and measuring the horizontal divergence of the flows. No specific measurement technique has, however, been developed to measure flow vorticity. Here we propose a new measurement technique tailored to measuring the vertical component of vorticity. Fluid vorticity is a fundamental property of solar convection zone dynamics and of rotating turbulent convection in particular. The method consists of measuring the travel time of waves along a closed contour on the solar surface in order to approximate the circulation of the flow along this contour. Vertical vorticity is related to the difference between clockwise and counter-clockwise travel times. We applied the method to characterize the vortical motions of solar convection using helioseismic data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/HMI) and from the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO/MDI). Away from the equator, a clear correlation between vertical vorticity and horizontal divergence is detected. Horizontal outflows are associated with negative vorticity in the northern hemisphere and positive vorticity in the southern hemisphere. The signal is much stronger for HMI than for MDI observations. We characterize the spatial power spectrum of the signal by comparison with a noise model. Vertical vorticity at horizontal wavenumbers below 250/R_Sun can be probed with this helioseismic technique.
  • Context. Several upcoming helioseismology space missions are very limited in telemetry and will have to perform extensive data compression. This requires the development of new methods of data compression. Aims. We give an overview of the influence of lossy data compression on local helioseismology. We investigate the effects of several lossy compression methods (quantization, JPEG compression, and smoothing and subsampling) on power spectra and time-distance measurements of supergranulation flows at disk center. Methods. We applied different compression methods to tracked and remapped Dopplergrams obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We determined the signal-to-noise ratio of the travel times computed from the compressed data as a function of the compression efficiency. Results. The basic helioseismic measurements that we consider are very robust to lossy data compression. Even if only the sign of the velocity is used, time-distance helioseismology is still possible. We achieve the best results by applying JPEG compression on spatially subsampled data. However, our conclusions are only valid for supergranulation flows at disk center and may not be valid for all helioseismology applications.
  • In time-distance helioseismology, information about the solar interior is encoded in measurements of travel times between pairs of points on the solar surface. Travel times are deduced from the cross-covariance of the random wave field. Here we consider travel times and also products of travel times as observables. They contain information about e.g. the statistical properties of convection in the Sun. The basic assumption of the model is that noise is the result of the stochastic excitation of solar waves, a random process which is stationary and Gaussian. We generalize the existing noise model (Gizon and Birch 2004) by dropping the assumption of horizontal spatial homogeneity. Using a recurrence relation, we calculate the noise covariance matrices for the moments of order 4, 6, and 8 of the observed wave field, for the moments of order 2, 3 and 4 of the cross-covariance, and for the moments of order 2, 3 and 4 of the travel times. All noise covariance matrices depend only on the expectation value of the cross-covariance of the observed wave field. For products of travel times, the noise covariance matrix consists of three terms proportional to $1/T$, $1/T^2$, and $1/T^3$, where $T$ is the duration of the observations. For typical observation times of a few hours, the term proportional to $1/T^2$ dominates and $Cov[\tau_1 \tau_2, \tau_3 \tau_4] \approx Cov[\tau_1, \tau_3] Cov[\tau_2, \tau_4] + Cov[\tau_1, \tau_4] Cov[\tau_2, \tau_3]$, where the $\tau_i$ are arbitrary travel times. This result is confirmed for $p_1$ travel times by Monte Carlo simulations and comparisons with SDO/HMI observations. General and accurate formulae have been derived to model the noise covariance matrix of helioseismic travel times and products of travel times. These results could easily be generalized to other methods of local helioseismology, such as helioseismic holography and ring diagram analysis.
  • The Solar Orbiter mission, to be launched in July 2017, will carry a suite of remote sensing and in-situ instruments, including the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI). PHI will deliver high-cadence images of the Sun in intensity and Doppler velocity suitable for carrying out novel helioseismic studies. The orbit of the Solar Orbiter spacecraft will reach a solar latitude of up to 21 deg (up to 34 deg by the end of the extended mission) and thus will enable the first local helioseismology studies of the polar regions. Here we consider an array of science objectives to be addressed by helioseismology within the baseline telemetry allocation (51 Gbit per orbit, current baseline) and within the science observing windows (baseline 3 x 10 days per orbit). A particularly important objective is the measurement of large-scale flows at high latitudes (rotation and meridional flow), which are largely unknown but play an important role in flux transport dynamos. The full range of Earth-Sun-spacecraft angles provided by the orbit will enable helioseismology from two vantage points by combining PHI with another instrument: stereoscopic helioseismology will allow the study of the deep solar interior and a better understanding of the physics of solar oscillations in both quiet Sun and sunspots. We have used a model of the PHI instrument to study its performance for helioseismology applications. As input we used a 6 hr time-series of realistic solar magneto-convection simulation (Stagger code) and the SPINOR radiative transfer code to synthesize the observables. The simulated power spectra of solar oscillations show that the instrument is suitable for helioseismology. In particular, the specified point spread function, image jitter, and photon noise are no obstacle to a successful mission.
  • The Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) filtergrams, taken at six wavelengths around the Fe I 6173.3 {\AA} line, contain information about the line-of-sight velocity over a range of heights in the solar atmosphere. Multi-height velocity inferences from these observations can be exploited to study wave motions and energy transport in the atmosphere. Using realistic convection simulation datasets provided by the STAGGER and MURaM codes, we generate synthetic filtergrams and explore several methods for estimating Dopplergrams. We investigate at which height each synthetic Dopplergram correlates most strongly with the vertical velocity in the model atmospheres. On the basis of the investigation, we propose two Dopplergrams other than the standard HMI-algorithm Dopplergram produced from HMI filtergrams: a line-center Dopplergram and an average-wing Dopplergram. These two Dopplergrams correlate most strongly with vertical velocities at the heights of 30 - 40 km above (line-center) and 30 - 40 km below (average-wing) the effective height of the HMI-algorithm Dopplergram. Therefore, we can obtain velocity information from two layers separated by about a half of a scale height in the atmosphere, at best. The phase shifts between these multi-height Dopplergrams from observational data as well as those from the simulated data are also consistent with the height-difference estimates in the frequency range above the photospheric acoustic cutoff frequency.
  • Linear time-domain simulations of acoustic oscillations are unstable in the stellar convection zone. To overcome this problem it is customary to compute the oscillations of a stabilized background stellar model. The stabilization, however, affects the result. Here we propose to use a perturbative approach (running the simulation twice) to approximately recover the acoustic wave field, while preserving seismic reciprocity. To test the method we considered a 1D standard solar model. We found that the mode frequencies of the (unstable) standard solar model are well approximated by the perturbative approach within $1~\mu$Hz for low-degree modes with frequencies near $3~\mu$Hz. We also show that the perturbative approach is appropriate for correcting rotational-frequency kernels. Finally, we comment that the method can be generalized to wave propagation in 3D magnetized stellar interiors because the magnetic fields have stabilizing effects on convection.
  • In order to assess the ability of helioseismology to probe the subsurface structure and magnetic field of sunspots, we need to determine how helioseismic travel times depend on perturbations to sunspot models. Here we numerically simulate the propagation of f, p1, and p2 wave packets through magnetic sunspot models. Among the models we considered, a ~50 km change in the height of the Wilson depression and a change in the subsurface magnetic field geometry can both be detected above the observational noise level. We also find that the travel-time shifts due to changes in a sunspot model must be modeled by computing the effects of changing the reference sunspot model, and not by computing the effects of changing the subsurface structure in the quiet-Sun model. For p1 modes the latter is wrong by a factor of four. In conclusion, numerical modeling of MHD wave propagation is an essential tool for the interpretation of the effects of sunspots on seismic waveforms.
  • Convection is the mechanism by which energy is transported through the outermost 30% of the Sun. Solar turbulent convection is notoriously difficult to model across the entire convection zone where the density spans many orders of magnitude. In this issue of PNAS, Hanasoge et al. (2012) employ recent helioseismic observations to derive stringent empirical constraints on the amplitude of large-scale convective velocities in the solar interior. They report an upper limit that is far smaller than predicted by a popular hydrodynamic numerical simulation.