• The merger of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) is not expected to generate detectable electromagnetic (EM) emission. However, the gravitational wave (GW) events GW150914 and GW170104, detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) to be the result of merging, ~60 solar mass binary black holes (BBHs), each have claimed coincident gamma-ray emission. Motivated by the intriguing possibility of an EM counterpart to BBH mergers, we construct a model that can reproduce the observed EM and GW signals for GW150914- and GW170104-like events, from a single-star progenitor. Following Loeb (2016), we envision a massive, rapidly rotating star within which a rotating bar instability fractures the core into two overdensities that fragment into clumps which merge to form BHs in a tight binary with arbitrary spin-orbit alignment. Once formed, the BBH inspirals due to gas and gravitational-wave drag until tidal forces trigger strong feeding of the BHs with the surrounding stellar-density gas about 10 seconds before merger. The resulting giga-Eddington accretion peak launches a jet that breaks out of the progenitor star and drives a powerful outflow that clears the gas from the orbit of the binary within one second, preserving the vacuum GW waveform in the LIGO band. The single-progenitor scenario predicts the existence of variability of the gamma-ray burst, modulated at the ~0.2 second chirping period of the BBH due to relativistic Doppler boost. The jet breakout should be accompanied by a low-luminosity supernova. Finally, because the BBHs of the single progenitor model do not exist at large separations, they will not be detectable in the low frequency gravitational wave band of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). Hence, the single-progenitor BBHs will be unambiguously discernible from BBHs formed through alternate, double-progenitor evolution scenarios.
  • As evident from the nearby examples of Proxima Centauri and TRAPPIST-1, Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone of low-mass stars are common. Here, we focus on such planetary systems and argue that their (oceanic) tides could be more prominent due to stronger tidal forces. We identify the conditions under which tides may exert a significant positive influence on biotic processes including abiogenesis, biological rhythms, nutrient upwelling and stimulating photosynthesis. We conclude our analysis with the identification of large-scale algal blooms as potential temporal biosignatures in reflectance light curves that can arise indirectly as a consequence of strong tidal forces.
  • The discovery of the first interstellar asteroid, 1I/2017 U1 (`Oumuamua), has opened a new era for research on interstellar objects. In this paper, we study the rotational dynamics of interstellar asteroids (ISAs) of irregular shapes moving through the interstellar gas. We find that regular mechanical torques resulting from the bombardment of gas flow on the irregular body could be important for the dynamics and destruction of ISAs. Mechanical torques can spin up the ISA, resulting in the breakup of the original ISA into small binary asteroids when the rotation rate exceeds the critical frequency. We find that the breakup timescale is short for ISAs of highly irregular shapes and low tensile strength. We apply our results to the first observed ISA, `Oumuamua, and suggest that its extreme elongated shape may originate from a reassembly of the binary fragments due to gravity along its journey in the interstellar medium. The tumbling of `Oumuamua could have been induced by rotational disruption due to mechanical torques. Finally, we discuss the survival possibility of high-velocity asteroids presumably formed by tidal disruption of planetary systems by the black hole at the Galactic center.
  • We consider the habitability of Earth-analogs around stars of different masses, which is regulated by the stellar lifetime, stellar wind-induced atmospheric erosion, and biologically active ultraviolet (UV) irradiance. By estimating the timescales associated with each of these processes, we show that they collectively impose limits on the habitability of Earth-analogs. We conclude that planets orbiting most M-dwarfs are not likely to host life, and that the highest probability of complex biospheres is for planets around K- and G-type stars. Our analysis suggests that the current existence of life near the Sun is slightly unusual, but not significantly anomalous.
  • The selection of optimal targets in the search for life represents a highly important strategic issue. In this Letter, we evaluate the benefits of searching for life around a potentially habitable planet orbiting a star of arbitrary mass relative to a similar planet around a Sun-like star. If recent physical arguments implying that the habitability of planets orbiting low-mass stars is selectively suppressed are correct, we find that planets around solar-type stars may represent the optimal targets.
  • We investigate the effects of black hole mergers in star clusters on the black hole mass function. As black holes are not produced in pair-instability supernovae, it is suggested that there is a dearth of high mass stellar black holes. This dearth generates a gap in the upper end of the black hole mass function. Meanwhile, parameter fitting of X-ray binaries suggests the existence of a gap in the mass function under 5 solar masses. We show, through evolving a coagulation equation, that black hole mergers can appreciably fill the upper mass gap, and that the lower mass gap generates potentially observable features at larger mass scales. We also explore the importance of ejections in such systems and whether dynamical clusters can be formation sites of intermediate mass black hole seeds.
  • A civilization in the habitable zone of a dwarf star might find it challenging to escape into interstellar space using chemical propulsion.
  • We propose a new model for the ignition of star formation in low-mass halos by a self-sustaining shock front in cosmic filaments at high redshifts. The gaseous fuel for star formation resides in low mass halos which can not cool on their own due to their primordial composition and low virial temperatures. We show that star formation can be triggered in these filaments by a passing shock wave. The shells swept-up by the shock cool and fragment into cold clumps that form massive stars via thermal instability on a timescale shorter than the front's dynamical timescale. The shock, in turn, is self-sustained by energy injection from supernova explosions. The star formation front is analogous to a detonation wave, which drives exothermic reactions powering the shock. We find that sustained star formation would typically propel the front to a speed of $\sim 300-700\,\rm km\,s^{-1}$ during the epoch of reionization. Future observations by the $\textit{James Webb Space Telescope}$ could reveal the illuminated regions of cosmic filaments, and constrain the initial mass function of stars in them.
  • We study the prospects for life on planets with subsurface oceans, and find that a wide range of planets can exist in diverse habitats with ice envelopes of moderate thickness. We quantify the energy sources available to these worlds, the rate of production of prebiotic compounds, and assess their potential for hosting biospheres. Life on these planets is likely to face challenges, which could be overcome through a combination of different mechanisms. We estimate the number of such worlds, and find that they may outnumber rocky planets in the habitable zone of stars by a few orders of magnitude.
  • The epoch of the formation of the first stars, known as the cosmic dawn, has emerged as a new arena in the search for dark matter. In particular, the first claimed 21-cm detection exhibits a deeper global absorption feature than expected, which could be caused by a low baryonic temperature. This has been interpreted as a sign for electromagnetic interactions between baryons and dark matter. However, in order to remain consistent with the rest of cosmological observations, only part of the dark matter is allowed to be charged, and thus interactive. This hypothesis has a striking prediction: large temperature anisotropies sourced by the velocity-dependent cooling of the baryons. Here we compute, for the first time, the 21-cm fluctuations caused by a charged component of the dark matter, including both the pre- and post-recombination evolution of all fluids. We find that, for the same parameters that can explain the anomalous 21-cm absorption signal, any fraction $f_{\rm dm}$ of charged dark matter larger than 2 % would cause 21-cm fluctuations with pronounced acoustic oscillations, and with an amplitude above any other known effects. These fluctuations would be observable at high significance with interferometers such as LOFAR and HERA, thus providing an additional probe of dark matter at cosmic dawn.
  • We use the critical step model to study the major transitions in evolution on Earth. We find that a total of five steps represents the most plausible estimate, in agreement with previous studies, and use the fossil record to identify the potential candidates. We apply the model to Earth-analogs around stars of different masses by incorporating the constraints on habitability set by stellar physics including the habitable zone lifetime, availability of ultraviolet radiation for prebiotic chemistry, and atmospheric escape. The critical step model suggests that the habitability of Earth-analogs around M-dwarfs is significantly suppressed. The total number of stars with planets containing detectable biosignatures of microbial life is expected to be highest for K-dwarfs. In contrast, we find that the corresponding value for intelligent life (technosignatures) should be highest for solar-mass stars. Thus, our work may assist in the identification of suitable targets in the search for biosignatures and technosignatures.
  • The origin and composition of the cosmological dark matter remain a mystery. However, upcoming 21-cm measurements during cosmic dawn, the period of the first stellar formation, can provide new clues on the nature of dark matter. During this era, the baryon-dark matter fluid is the slowest it will ever be, making it ideal to search for dark matter elastically scattering with baryons through massless mediators, such as the photon. Here we explore whether dark-matter particles with an electric "minicharge" can significantly alter the baryonic temperature and, thus, affect 21-cm observations. We find that the entirety of the dark matter cannot be minicharged at a significant level, lest it interferes with Galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields. However, if minicharged particles comprise a subpercent fraction of the dark matter, and have charges $\epsilon \sim 10^{-6}$---in units of the electron charge---and masses $m_\chi \sim 1-60$ MeV, they can significantly cool down the baryonic fluid, and be discovered in 21-cm experiments. We show how this scenario can explain the recent result by the EDGES collaboration, which requires a lower baryonic temperature than possible within the standard model, while remaining consistent with all current observations.
  • The economy and fate of extraterrestrial civilizations should depend on the abundance of gold and uranium, made in neutron star mergers.
  • We study star formation within outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a new source of hypervelocity stars (HVSs). Recent observations revealed active star formation inside a galactic outflow at a rate of $\sim 15\,M_{\odot}\,\rm yr^{-1}$. We verify that the shells swept up by an AGN outflow are capable of cooling and fragmentation into cold clumps embedded in a hot tenuous gas via thermal instabilities. We show that cold clumps of $\sim 10^3\,M_{\odot}$ are formed within $\sim 10^5$ yrs. As a result, stars are produced along outflow's path, endowed with the outflow speed at their formation site. These HVSs travel through the galactic halo and eventually escape into the intergalactic medium. The expected instantaneous rate of star formation inside the outflow is $\sim 4-5$ orders of magnitude greater than the average rate associated with previously proposed mechanisms for producing HVSs, such as the Hills mechanism and three-body interaction between a star and a black hole binary. We predict the spatial distribution of HVSs formed in AGN outflows for future observational probe.
  • Academia owes the public a fresh look at its education and research mission. First and foremost, researchers must communicate the results of their latest studies in a truthful and meaningful way. Second, the traditional boundaries among disciplines should be blurred since innovation often blossoms along these boundaries. Third, universities should develop courses which are relevant for the skills required in the job market today. Finally, professors should mentor the future leaders of science, technology, arts and humanities and not just replicate themselves.
  • We investigate the ability of ground based gravitational wave observatories to detect gravitational wave lensing events caused by stellar mass lenses. We show that LIGO and Virgo possess the sensitivities required to detect lenses with masses as small as $\sim 30 M_\odot$ provided that the gravitational wave is observed with a signal-to-noise ratio of $\sim30$. Third generation observatories will allow detection of gravitational wave lenses with masses of $\sim 1 M_\odot$. Finally, we discuss the possibility of lensing by multiple stars, as is the case if the gravitational radiation is passing through galactic nucleus or a dense star cluster.
  • We estimate the capture rate of interstellar objects by means of three-body gravitational interactions. We apply this model to the Sun-Jupiter system and the Alpha Centauri A\&B binary system, and find that the radius of the largest captured object is a few tens of km and Earth-sized respectively. We explore the implications of our model for the transfer of life by means of rocky material. The interstellar comets captured by the "fishing net" of the Solar system can be potentially distinguished by their differing ratios of oxygen isotopes through high-resolution spectroscopy of water vapor in their tails.
  • Recent Kepler photometry has revealed that about half of white dwarfs (WDs) have periodic, low-level (~ 1e-4 - 1e-3), optical variations. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ultraviolet spectroscopy has shown that up to about one half of WDs are actively accreting rocky planetary debris, as evidenced by the presence of photospheric metal absorption lines. We have obtained HST ultraviolet spectra of seven WDs that have been monitored for periodic variations, to test the hypothesis that these two phenomena are causally connected, i.e. that the optical periodic modulation is caused by WD rotation coupled with an inhomogeneous surface distribution of accreted metals. We detect photospheric metals in four out of the seven WDs. However, we find no significant correspondence between the existence of optical periodic variability and the detection of photospheric ultraviolet absorption lines. Thus the null hypothesis stands, that the two phenomena are not directly related. Some other source of WD surface inhomogeneity, perhaps related to magnetic field strength, combined with the WD rotation, or alternatively effects due to close binary companions, may be behind the observed optical modulation. We report the marginal detection of molecular hydrogen in WD J1949+4734, only the fourth known WD with detected H_2 lines. We also re-classify J1926+4219 as a carbon-rich He-sdO subdwarf.
  • Black holes growing via the accretion of gas emit radiation that can photoevaporate the atmospheres of nearby planets. Here we couple planetary structural evolution models of sub-Neptune mass planets to the growth of the Milky way's central supermassive black-hole, Sgr A$^*$ and investigate how planetary evolution is influenced by quasar activity. We find that, out to ${\sim} 20$ pc from Sgr A$^*$, the XUV flux emitted during its quasar phase can remove several percent of a planet's H/He envelope by mass; in many cases, this removal results in bare rocky cores, many of which situated in the habitable zones (HZs) of G-type stars. The erosion of sub-Neptune sized planets may be one of the most prevalent channels by which terrestrial super-Earths are created near the Galactic Center. As such, the planet population demographics may be quite different close to Sgr A$^*$ than in the Galaxy's outskirts. The high stellar densities in this region (about seven orders of magnitude greater than the solar neighborhood) imply that the distance between neighboring rocky worlds is short ($500-5000$~AU). The proximity between potentially habitable terrestrial planets may enable the onset of widespread interstellar panspermia near the nuclei of galaxies. More generally, we predict these phenomena to be ubiquitous for planets in nuclear star clusters and ultra-compact dwarfs. Globular clusters, on the other hand, are less affected by the black holes.
  • As we discover numerous habitable planets around other stars in the Milky Way galaxy, including the nearest star, Proxima Centauri, one cannot help but wonder why have we not detected evidence for an advanced alien civilization as of yet. The surfaces of other planets might show either relics of advanced civilizations that destroyed themselves by self-inflicted catastrophes or living civilizations that are technologically primitive. Such circumstances can only be revealed by visiting those planets and not by remote observations.
  • We carry out 3-D numerical simulations to assess the penetration and bombardment effects of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), i.e. high-energy particle bursts during large flares and superflares, on ancient and current Mars. We demonstrate that the deposition of SEPs is non-uniform at the planetary surface, and that the corresponding energy flux is lower than other sources postulated to have influenced the origin of life. Nevertheless, SEPs may have been capable of facilitating the synthesis of a wide range of vital organic molecules (e.g. nucleobases and amino acids). Owing to the relatively high efficiency of these pathways, the overall yields might be comparable to (or even exceed) the values predicted for some conventional sources such as electrical discharges and exogenous delivery by meteorites. We also suggest that SEPs could have played a role in enabling the initiation of lightning. A notable corollary of our work is that SEPs may constitute an important mechanism for prebiotic synthesis on exoplanets around M-dwarfs, thereby mitigating the deficiency of biologically active ultraviolet radiation on these planets. Although there are several uncertainties associated with (exo)planetary environments and prebiotic chemical pathways, our study illustrates that SEPs represent a potentially important factor in understanding the origin of life.
  • We investigate the evolution of dust content in galaxies from redshifts z=0 to z=9.5. Using empirically motivated prescriptions, we model galactic-scale properties -- including halo mass, stellar mass, star formation rate, gas mass, and metallicity -- to make predictions for the galactic evolution of dust mass and dust temperature in main sequence galaxies. Our simple analytic model, which predicts that galaxies in the early Universe had greater quantities of dust than their low-redshift counterparts, does a good job at reproducing observed trends between galaxy dust and stellar mass out to z~6. We find that for fixed galaxy stellar mass, the dust temperature increases from z=0 to z=6. Our model forecasts a population of low-mass, high-redshift galaxies with interstellar dust as hot as, or hotter than, their more massive counterparts; but this prediction needs to be constrained by observations. Finally, we make predictions for observing 1.1-mm flux density arising from interstellar dust emission with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.
  • Compact stellar binaries are expected to survive in the dense environment of the Galactic Center. The stable binaries may undergo Kozai-Lidov oscillations due to perturbations from the central supermassive black hole (Sgr A*), yet the General Relativistic precession can suppress the Kozai-Lidov oscillations and keep the stellar binaries from merging. However, it is challenging to resolve the binary sources and distinguish them from single stars. The close separation of the stable binaries allow higher eclipse probabilities. Here, we consider the massive star SO2 as an example and calculate the probability of detecting eclipses, assuming it is a binary. We find that the eclipse probability is ~ 30-50%, reaching higher values when the stellar binary is more eccentric or highly inclined relative to its orbit around Sgr A*.
  • We explore the expected X-ray (0.5-2keV) signatures from super massive black holes (SMBHs) at high redshifts ($z\sim5-12$) assuming various models for their seeding mechanism and evolution. The seeding models are approximated through deviations from the M$_{BH}-\sigma$ relation observed in the local universe. We use results from N-body simulations of the large-scale structure to estimate the density of observable SMBHs. We focus on two families of seeding models: (\textit{i}) light seed BHs from remnants of Pop-III stars; and (\textit{ii}) heavy seeds from the direct collapse of gas clouds. We investigate several models for the accretion history, such as sub-Eddington accretion, slim disk models allowing mild super-Eddington accretion and torque-limited growth models. We consider observations with two instruments: (\textit{i}) the Chandra X-ray observatory, and (\textit{ii}) the proposed Lynx. We find that all the simulated models are in agreement with the current results from Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) - \textit{i.e.,} consistent with zero to a few observed SMBHs in the field of view. In deep Lynx exposures, the number of observed objects is expected to become statistically significant. We demonstrate the capability to limit the phase space of plausible scenarios of the birth and evolution of SMBHs by performing deep observations at a flux limit of $1\times10^{-19}\mathrm{erg\,cm^{-2}\,s^{-1}}$. Finally, we estimate the expected contribution from each model to the unresolved cosmic X-ray background (CXRB), and show that our models are in agreement with current limits on the CXRB and the expected contribution from unresolved quasars. We find that an analysis of CXRB contributions down to the Lynx confusion limit yields valuable information that can help identify the correct scenario for the birth and evolution of SMBHs.
  • We explore some of the ramifications arising from superflares on the evolutionary history of Earth, other planets in the Solar system, and exoplanets. We propose that the most powerful superflares can serve as plausible drivers of extinction events, and that their periodicity could correspond to certain patterns in the terrestrial fossil diversity record. On the other hand, weaker superflares may play a positive role in enabling the origin of life through the formation of key organic compounds. Superflares could also prove to be quite detrimental to the evolution of complex life on present-day Mars and exoplanets in the habitable zone of M- and K-dwarfs. We conclude that the risk posed by superflares has not been sufficiently appreciated, and that humanity might potentially witness a superflare event in the next $\sim 10^3$ years leading to devastating economic and technological losses. In light of the many uncertainties and assumptions associated with our analysis, we recommend that these results should be viewed with due caution.