• We present new results on realtime alternating, private alternating, and quantum alternating automaton models. Firstly, we show that the emptiness problem for alternating one-counter automata on unary alphabets is undecidable. Then, we present two equivalent definitions of realtime private alternating finite automata (PAFAs). We show that the emptiness problem is undecidable for PAFAs. Furthermore, PAFAs can recognize some nonregular unary languages, including the unary squares language, which seems to be difficult even for some classical counter automata with two-way input. Regarding quantum finite automata (QFAs), we show that the emptiness problem is undecidable both for universal QFAs on general alphabets, and for alternating QFAs with two alternations on unary alphabets. On the other hand, the same problem is decidable for nondeterministic QFAs on general alphabets. We also show that the unary squares language is recognized by alternating QFAs with two alternations.
  • Quantum computing is a new model of computation, based on quantum physics. Quantum computers can be exponentially faster than conventional computers for problems such as factoring. Besides full-scale quantum computers, more restricted models such as quantum versions of finite automata have been studied. In this paper, we survey various models of quantum finite automata and their properties. We also provide some open questions and new directions for researchers. Keywords: quantum finite automata, probabilistic finite automata, nondeterminism, bounded error, unbounded error, state complexity, decidability and undecidability, computational complexity
  • We show that one-way quantum one-counter automaton with zero-error is more powerful than its probabilistic counterpart on promise problems. Then, we obtain a similar separation result between Las Vegas one-way probabilistic one-counter automaton and one-way deterministic one-counter automaton. We also obtain new results on classical counter automata regarding language recognition. It was conjectured that one-way probabilistic one blind-counter automata cannot recognize Kleene closure of equality language [A. Yakaryilmaz: Superiority of one-way and realtime quantum machines. RAIRO - Theor. Inf. and Applic. 46(4): 615-641 (2012)]. We show that this conjecture is false, and also show several separation results for blind/non-blind counter automata.
  • We examine inkdots placed on the input string as a way of providing advice to finite automata, and establish the relations between this model and the previously studied models of advised finite automata. The existence of an infinite hierarchy of classes of languages that can be recognized with the help of increasing numbers of inkdots as advice is shown. The effects of different forms of advice on the succinctness of the advised machines are examined. We also study randomly placed inkdots as advice to probabilistic finite automata, and demonstrate the superiority of this model over its deterministic version. Even very slowly growing amounts of space can become a resource of meaningful use if the underlying advised model is extended with access to secondary memory, while it is famously known that such small amounts of space are not useful for unadvised one-way Turing machines.
  • We introduce the affine OBDD model and show that zero-error affine OBDDs can be exponentially narrower than bounded-error unitary and probabilistic OBDDs on certain problems. Moreover, we show that Las Vegas unitary and probabilistic OBDDs can be quadratically narrower than deterministic OBDDs. We also obtain the same results by considering the automata versions of these models.
  • We investigate the minimum cases for realtime probabilistic machines that can define uncountably many languages with bounded error. We show that logarithmic space is enough for realtime PTMs on unary languages. On binary case, we follow the same result for double logarithmic space, which is tight. When replacing the worktape with some limited memories, we can follow uncountable results on unary languages for two counters.
  • We investigate the width complexity of nondeterministic unitary OBDDs (NUOBDDs). Firstly, we present a generic lower bound on their widths based on the size of strong 1-fooling sets. Then, we present classically cheap functions that are expensive for NUOBDDs and vice versa by improving the previous gap. We also present a function for which neither classical nor unitary nondeterminism does help. Moreover, based on our results, we present a width hierarchy for NUOBDDs. Lastly, we provide the bounds on the widths of NUOBDDs for the basic Boolean operations negation, union, and intersection.
  • We investigate the computational power of affine automata (AfAs) introduced in [4]. In particular, we present a simpler proof for how to change the cutpoint for any affine language and a method how to reduce error in bounded error case. Moreover, we address to the question of [4] by showing that any affine language can be recognized by an AfA with certain limitation on the entries of affine states and transition matrices. Lastly, we present the first languages shown to be not recognized by AfAs with bounded-error.
  • It is well known that the emptiness problem for binary probabilistic automata and so for quantum automata is undecidable. We present the current status of the emptiness problems for unary probabilistic and quantum automata with connections with Skolem's and positivity problems. We also introduce the concept of linear recurrence automata in order to show the connection naturally. Then, we also give possible generalizations of linear recurrence relations and automata on vectors.
  • Polynomial--time constant--space quantum Turing machines (QTMs) and logarithmic--space probabilistic Turing machines (PTMs) recognize uncountably many languages with bounded error (Say and Yakary\i lmaz 2014, arXiv:1411.7647). In this paper, we investigate more restricted cases for both models to recognize uncountably many languages with bounded error. We show that double logarithmic space is enough for PTMs on unary languages in sweeping reading mode or logarithmic space for one-way head. On unary languages, for quantum models, we obtain middle logarithmic space for counter machines. For binary languages, arbitrary small non-constant space is enough for PTMs even using only counter as memory. For counter machines, when restricted to polynomial time, we can obtain the same result for linear space. For constant--space QTMs, we follow the result for a restricted sweeping head, known as restarting realtime.
  • In this work we study a non-linear generalization based on affine transformations of probabilistic and quantum automata proposed recently by D\'iaz-Caro and Yakary{\i}lmaz \cite{DCY16A} referred as affine automata. First, we present efficient simulations of probabilistic and quantum automata by means of affine automata which allows us to characterize the class of exclusive stochastic languages. Then, we initiate a study on the succintness of affine automata. In particular, we show that an infinite family of unary regular languages can be recognized by 2-state affine automata but the state numbers of quantum and probabilistic automata cannot be bounded. Finally, we present the characterization of all (regular) unary languages recognized by two-state affine automata.
  • We introduce a quantum-like classical computational model, called affine computation, as a generalization of probabilistic computation. After giving the basics of affine computation, we define affine finite automata (AfA) and compare it with quantum and probabilistic finite automata (QFA and PFA, respectively) with respect to three basic language recognition modes. We show that, in the cases of bounded and unbounded error, AfAs are more powerful than QFAs and PFAs, and, in the case of nondeterministic computation, AfAs are more powerful than PFAs but equivalent to QFAs.
  • Determining the minimum number of states required by a finite automaton to separate a given pair of different words is an important problem. In this paper, we consider this problem for quantum automata (QFAs). We show that 2-state QFAs can separate any pair of words in nondeterministic acceptance mode and conjecture that they can separate any pair also with zero-error. Then, we focus on (a more general problem) separating a pair of two disjoint finite set of words. We show that QFAs can separate them efficiently in nondeterministic acceptance mode, i.e. the number of states is two to the power of the size of the small set. Additionally, we examine affine finite automata (AfAs) and show that two states are enough to separate any pair with zero-error. Moreover, AfAs can separate any pair of disjoint finite sets of words with one-sided bounded error efficiently like QFAs in nondeterministic mode.
  • We present several new results on minimal space requirements to recognize a nonregular language: (i) realtime nondeterministic Turing machines can recognize a nonregular unary language within weak $\log\log n$ space, (ii) $\log\log n$ is a tight space lower bound for accepting general nonregular languages on weak realtime pushdown automata, (iii) there exist unary nonregular languages accepted by realtime alternating one-counter automata within weak $\log n$ space, (iv) there exist nonregular languages accepted by two-way deterministic pushdown automata within strong $\log\log n$ space, and, (v) there exist unary nonregular languages accepted by two-way one-counter automata using quantum and classical states with middle $\log n$ space and bounded error.
  • We study a model where two opposing provers debate over the membership status of a given string in a language, trying to convince a weak verifier whose coins are visible to all. We show that the incorporation of just two qubits to an otherwise classical constant-space verifier raises the class of debatable languages from at most $\mathsf{NP}$ to the collection of all Turing-decidable languages (recursive languages). When the verifier is further constrained to make the correct decision with probability 1, the corresponding class goes up from the regular languages up to at least $\mathsf{E}$. We also show that the quantum model outperforms its classical counterpart when restricted to run in polynomial time, and demonstrate some non-context-free languages which have such short debates with quantum verifiers.
  • We continue the systematic investigation of probabilistic and quantum finite automata (PFAs and QFAs) on promise problems by focusing on unary languages. We show that bounded-error QFAs are more powerful than PFAs. But, in contrary to the binary problems, the computational powers of Las-Vegas QFAs and bounded-error PFAs are equivalent to deterministic finite automata (DFAs). Lastly, we present a new family of unary promise problems with two parameters such that when fixing one parameter QFAs can be exponentially more succinct than PFAs and when fixing the other parameter PFAs can be exponentially more succinct than DFAs.
  • Stochastic languages are the languages recognized by probabilistic finite automata (PFAs) with cutpoint over the field of real numbers. More general computational models over the same field such as generalized finite automata (GFAs) and quantum finite automata (QFAs) define the same class. In 1963, Rabin proved the set of stochastic languages to be uncountable presenting a single 2-state PFA over the binary alphabet recognizing uncountably many languages depending on the cutpoint. In this paper, we show the same result for unary stochastic languages. Namely, we exhibit a 2-state unary GFA, a 2-state unary QFA, and a family of 3-state unary PFAs recognizing uncountably many languages; all these numbers of states are optimal. After this, we completely characterize the class of languages recognized by 1-state GFAs, which is the only nontrivial class of languages recognized by 1-state automata. Finally, we consider the variations of PFAs, QFAs, and GFAs based on the notion of inclusive/exclusive cutpoint, and present some results on their expressive power.
  • Although polynomial-time probabilistic Turing machines can utilize uncomputable transition probabilities to recognize uncountably many languages with bounded error when allowed to use logarithmic space, it is known that such "magic coins" give no additional computational power to constant-space versions of those machines. We show that adding a few quantum bits to the model changes the picture dramatically. For every language $L$, there exists such a two-way quantum finite automaton that recognizes a language of the same Turing degree as $L$ with bounded error in polynomial time. When used as verifiers in public-coin interactive proof systems, such automata can verify membership in all languages with bounded error, outperforming their classical counterparts, which are known to fail for the palindromes language.
  • Promise problems were mainly studied in quantum automata theory. Here we focus on state complexity of classical automata for promise problems. First, it was known that there is a family of unary promise problems solvable by quantum automata by using a single qubit, but the number of states required by corresponding one-way deterministic automata cannot be bounded by a constant. For this family, we show that even two-way nondeterminism does not help to save a single state. By comparing this with the corresponding state complexity of alternating machines, we then get a tight exponential gap between two-way nondeterministic and one-way alternating automata solving unary promise problems. Second, despite of the existing quadratic gap between Las Vegas realtime probabilistic automata and one-way deterministic automata for language recognition, we show that, by turning to promise problems, the tight gap becomes exponential. Last, we show that the situation is different for one-way probabilistic automata with two-sided bounded-error. We present a family of unary promise problems that is very easy for these machines; solvable with only two states, but the number of states in two-way alternating or any simpler automata is not limited by a constant. Moreover, we show that one-way bounded-error probabilistic automata can solve promise problems not solvable at all by any other classical model.
  • A two-way deterministic finite state automaton with one counter (2D1CA) is a fundamental computational model that has been examined in many different aspects since sixties, but we know little about its power in the case of unary languages. Up to our knowledge, the only known unary nonregular languages recognized by 2D1CAs are those formed by strings having exponential length, where the exponents form some trivial unary regular language. In this paper, we present some non-trivial subsets of these languages. By using the input head as a second counter, we present simulations of two-way deterministic finite automata with linearly bounded counters and linear--space Turing machines. We also show how a fixed-size quantum register can help to simplify some of these languages. Finally, we compare unary 2D1CAs with two--counter machines and provide some insights about the limits of their computational power.
  • We present five examples where quantum finite automata (QFAs) outperform their classical counterparts. This may be useful as a relatively simple technique to introduce quantum computation concepts to computer scientists. We also describe a modern QFA model involving superoperators that is able to simulate all known QFA and classical finite automaton variants.
  • We construct zero-error quantum finite automata (QFAs) for promise problems which cannot be solved by bounded-error probabilistic finite automata (PFAs). Here is a summary of our results: - There is a promise problem solvable by an exact two-way QFA in exponential expected time, but not by any bounded-error sublogarithmic space probabilistic Turing machine (PTM). - There is a promise problem solvable by an exact two-way QFA in quadratic expected time, but not by any bounded-error $ o(\log \log n) $-space PTMs in polynomial expected time. The same problem can be solvable by a one-way Las Vegas (or exact two-way) QFA with quantum head in linear (expected) time. - There is a promise problem solvable by a Las Vegas realtime QFA, but not by any bounded-error realtime PFA. The same problem can be solvable by an exact two-way QFA in linear expected time but not by any exact two-way PFA. - There is a family of promise problems such that each promise problem can be solvable by a two-state exact realtime QFAs, but, there is no such bound on the number of states of realtime bounded-error PFAs solving the members this family. Our results imply that there exist zero-error quantum computational devices with a \emph{single qubit} of memory that cannot be simulated by any finite memory classical computational model. This provides a computational perspective on results regarding ontological theories of quantum mechanics \cite{Hardy04}, \cite{Montina08}. As a consequence we find that classical automata based simulation models \cite{Kleinmann11}, \cite{Blasiak13} are not sufficiently powerful to simulate quantum contextuality. We conclude by highlighting the interplay between results from automata models and their application to developing a general framework for quantum contextuality.
  • We define a model of advised computation by finite automata where the advice is provided on a separate tape. We consider several variants of the model where the advice is deterministic or randomized, the input tape head is allowed real-time, one-way, or two-way access, and the automaton is classical or quantum. We prove several separation results among these variants, demonstrate an infinite hierarchy of language classes recognized by automata with increasing advice lengths, and establish the relationships between this and the previously studied ways of providing advice to finite automata.
  • The minimum amount of resources to recognize a nonregular language is a fundamental research topic in theoretical computer science which has been examined for different kinds of resources and many different models. In this note, we focus on unary languages and space complexity on counters. Our model is two-way one-counter automaton with quantum and classical states (2QCCA), which is a two-way finite automaton with one-counter (2DCA) augmented with a fixed size quantum register or a two-way finite automaton with quantum and classical states (2QCFA) augmented with a classical counter. It is known that any 2DCA using a sublinear space on its counter can recognize only regular languages \cite{DG82B}. In this note, we show that bounded-error 2QCCAs can recognize a non-regular unary language by using logarithmic space on its counters for the members. Note that it is still an open problem whether bounded-error 2QCFA can recognize a non-regular unary language.
  • We examine the minimum amount of memory for real-time, as opposed to one-way, computation accepting nonregular languages. We consider deterministic, nondeterministic and alternating machines working within strong, middle and weak space, and processing general or unary inputs. In most cases, we are able to show that the lower bounds for one-way machines remain tight in the real-time case. Memory lower bounds for nonregular acceptance on other devices are also addressed. It is shown that increasing the number of stacks of real-time pushdown automata can result in exponential improvement in the total amount of space usage for nonregular language recognition.