• We use the results of previous work building a halo model formalism for the distribution of neutral hydrogen, along with experimental parameters of future radio facilities, to place forecasts on astrophysical and cosmological parameters from next generation surveys. We consider 21 cm intensity mapping surveys conducted using the BINGO, CHIME, FAST, TianLai, MeerKAT and SKA experimental configurations. We work with the 5-parameter cosmological dataset of {$\Omega_m, \sigma_8, h, n_s, \Omega_b$} assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM model, and the astrophysical parameters {$v_{c,0}, \beta$} which represent the cutoff and slope of the HI- halo mass relation. We explore (i) quantifying the effects of the astrophysics on the recovery of the cosmological parameters, (ii) the dependence of the cosmological forecasts on the details of the astrophysical parametrization, and (iii) the improvement of the constraints on probing smaller scales in the HI power spectrum. For an SKA I MID intensity mapping survey alone, probing scales up to $\ell_{\rm max} = 1000$, we find a factor of $1.1 - 1.3$ broadening in the constraints on $\Omega_b$ and $\Omega_m$, and of $2.4 - 2.6$ on $h$, $n_s$ and $\sigma_8$, if we marginalize over astrophysical parameters without any priors. However, even the prior information coming from the present knowledge of the astrophysics largely alleviates this broadening. These findings do not change significantly on considering an extended HIHM relation, illustrating the robustness of the results to the choice of the astrophysical parametrization. Probing scales up to $\ell_{\rm max} = 2000$ improves the constraints by factors of 1.5-1.8. The forecasts improve on increasing the number of tomographic redshift bins, saturating, in many cases, with 4 - 5 redshift bins. We also forecast constraints for intensity mapping with other experiments, and draw similar conclusions.
  • Context. High-contrast exoplanet imaging is a rapidly growing field as can be seen through the significant resources invested. In fact, the detection and characterization of exoplanets through direct imaging is featured at all major ground-based observatories. Aims. We aim to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achievable for ground-based, adaptive-optics assisted exoplanet imaging by applying sophisticated post-processing algorithms. In particular, we investigate the benefits of including time domain information. Methods. We introduce a new speckle-suppression technique in data post-processing based on wavelet transformation. This technique explicitly considers the time domain in a given data set (specifically the frequencies of speckle variations and their time dependence) and allows us to filter-out speckle noise. We combine our wavelet-based algorithm with state-of-the-art principal component analysis (PCA) based PSF subtraction routines and apply it to archival data sets of known directly imaged exoplanets. The data sets were obtained in the L filter where the short integration times allow for a sufficiently high temporal sampling of the speckle variations. Results. We demonstrate that improvements in the peak SNR of up to forty to sixty percent can be achieved. We also show that, when combined with wavelet-denoising, the PCA PSF model requires systematically smaller numbers of components for the fit to achieve the highest SNR. The improvement potential is, however, data set dependent or, more specifically, closely linked to the field rotation available in a given data set: larger amounts of rotation allow for a better suppression of the speckle noise. Conclusions. We have demonstrated that by applying advanced data post-processing techniques, the contrast performance in archival high-contrast imaging data sets can be improved.
  • We present the gauge-invariant formalism of cosmological weak lensing, accounting for all the relativistic effects due to the scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations at the linear order. While the light propagation is fully described by the geodesic equation, the relation of the photon wavevector to the physical quantities requires the specification of the frames, where they are defined. By constructing the local tetrad bases at the observer and the source positions, we clarify the relation of the weak lensing observables such as the convergence, the shear, and the rotation to the physical size and shape defined in the source rest-frame and the observed angle and redshift measured in the observer rest-frame. Compared to the standard lensing formalism, additional relativistic effects contribute to all the lensing observables. We explicitly verify the gauge-invariance of the lensing observables and compare our results to previous work. In particular, we demonstrate that even in the presence of the vector and tensor perturbations, the physical rotation of the lensing observables vanishes at the linear order, while the tetrad basis rotates along the light propagation compared to a FRW coordinate. Though the latter is often used as a probe of primordial gravitational waves, the rotation of the tetrad basis is indeed not a physical observable. We further clarify its relation to the E-B decomposition in weak lensing. Our formalism provides a transparent and comprehensive perspective of cosmological weak lensing.
  • We study the distribution of dark matter in the nonlinear regime in a model in which the primordial fluctuations include, in addition to the dominant primordial Gaussian fluctuations generated by the standard $\Lambda CDM$ cosmological model, the effects of a cosmic string wake set up at the time of equal matter and radiation, making use of cosmological $N$-body simulations. At early times the string wake leads to a planar overdensity of dark matter. We study how this non-Gaussian pattern of a cosmic string wake evolves in the presence of the Gaussian perturbations, making use of wavelet and ridgelet-like statistics specifically designed to extract string wake signals. At late times the Gaussian fluctuations disrupt the string wake. We find that for a string tension of $G \mu = 10^{-7}$, a value just below the current observational limit, the effects of a string wake can be identified in the dark matter distribution, using the current level of the statistical analysis, down to a redshift of $z = 10$.
  • We present Lenstronomy, a multi-purpose open-source gravitational lens modeling python package. Lenstronomy is able to reconstruct the lens mass and surface brightness distributions of strong lensing systems using forward modelling. Lenstronomy supports a wide range of analytic lens and light models in arbitrary combination. The software is also able to reconstruct complex extended sources (Birrer et. al 2015) as well as being able to model point sources. We designed Lenstronomy to be stable, flexible and numerically accurate, with a clear user interface that could be deployed across different platforms. Throughout its development, we have actively used Lenstronomy to make several measurements including deriving constraints on dark matter properties in strong lenses, measuring the expansion history of the universe with time-delay cosmography, measuring cosmic shear with Einstein rings and decomposing quasar and host galaxy light. The software is distributed under the MIT license. The documentation, starter guide, example notebooks, source code and installation guidelines can be found at https://lenstronomy.readthedocs.io.
  • Weak lensing peak counts are a powerful statistical tool for constraining cosmological parameters. So far, this method has been applied only to surveys with relatively small areas, up to several hundred square degrees. As future surveys will provide weak lensing datasets with size of thousands of square degrees, the demand on the theoretical prediction of the peak statistics will become heightened. In particular, large simulations of increased cosmological volume are required. In this work, we investigate the possibility of using simulations generated with the fast Comoving-Lagrangian acceleration (COLA) method, coupled to the convergence map generator Ufalcon, for predicting the peak counts. We examine the systematics introduced by the COLA method by comparing it with a full TreePM code. We find that for a 2000 deg$^2$ survey, the systematic error is much smaller than the statistical error. This suggests that the COLA method is able to generate promising theoretical predictions for weak lensing peaks. We also examine the constraining power of various configurations of data vectors, exploring the influence of splitting the sample into tomographic bins and combining different smoothing scales. We find the combination of smoothing scales to have the most constraining power, improving the constraints on the $S_8$ amplitude parameter by at least 40% compared to a single smoothing scale, with tomography brining only limited increase in measurement precision.
  • Galaxy spectra are essential to probe the spatial distribution of galaxies in our Universe. To better interpret current and future spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys, it is important to be able to simulate these data sets. We describe Uspec, a forward modeling tool to generate galaxy spectra taking into account intrinsic galaxy properties as well as instrumental responses of a given telescope. The model for the intrinsic properties of the galaxy population was developed in an earlier work for broad-band imaging surveys [1]. We apply Uspec to the SDSS/CMASS sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). We construct selection cuts that match those used to build this LRG sample, which we then apply to data and simulations in the same way. The resulting real and simulated average spectra show a very good agreement overall, with the simulated one showing a slightly bluer galaxy population. For a quantitative comparison, we perform Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the sets of spectra. By comparing the PCs constructed from simulations and data, we find very good agreement for the first four components, and moderate for the fifth. The distributions of the eigencoefficients also show an appreciable overlap. We are therefore able to properly simulate the LRG sample taking into account the SDSS/BOSS instrumental responses. The small residual differences between the two samples can be ascribed to the intrinsic properties of the simulated galaxy population, which can be reduced by adjusting the model parameters in the future. This provides good prospects for the forward modeling of upcoming large spectroscopic surveys.
  • Dark matter in the universe evolves through gravity to form a complex network of halos, filaments, sheets and voids, that is known as the cosmic web. Computational models of the underlying physical processes, such as classical N-body simulations, are extremely resource intensive, as they track the action of gravity in an expanding universe using billions of particles as tracers of the cosmic matter distribution. Therefore, upcoming cosmology experiments will face a computational bottleneck that may limit the exploitation of their full scientific potential. To address this challenge, we demonstrate the application of a machine learning technique called Generative Adversarial Networks (GAN) to learn models that can efficiently generate new, physically realistic realizations of the cosmic web. Our training set is a small, representative sample of 2D image snapshots from N-body simulations of size 500 and 100 Mpc. We show that the GAN-produced results are qualitatively and quantitatively very similar to the originals. Generation of a new cosmic web realization with a GAN takes a fraction of a second, compared to the many hours needed by the N-body technique. We anticipate that GANs will therefore play an important role in providing extremely fast and precise simulations of cosmic web in the era of large cosmological surveys, such as Euclid and LSST.
  • Modeling the Point Spread Function (PSF) of wide-field surveys is vital for many astrophysical applications and cosmological probes including weak gravitational lensing. The PSF smears the image of any recorded object and therefore needs to be taken into account when inferring properties of galaxies from astronomical images. In the case of cosmic shear, the PSF is one of the dominant sources of systematic errors and must be treated carefully to avoid biases in cosmological parameters. Recently, forward modeling approaches to calibrate shear measurements within the Monte-Carlo Control Loops ($MCCL$) framework have been developed. These methods typically require simulating a large amount of wide-field images, thus, the simulations need to be very fast yet have realistic properties in key features such as the PSF pattern. Hence, such forward modeling approaches require a very flexible PSF model, which is quick to evaluate and whose parameters can be estimated reliably from survey data. We present a PSF model that meets these requirements based on a fast deep-learning method to estimate its free parameters. We demonstrate our approach on publicly available SDSS data. We extract the most important features of the SDSS sample via principal component analysis. Next, we construct our model based on perturbations of a fixed base profile, ensuring that it captures these features. We then train a Convolutional Neural Network to estimate the free parameters of the model from noisy images of the PSF. This allows us to render a model image of each star, which we compare to the SDSS stars to evaluate the performance of our method. We find that our approach is able to accurately reproduce the SDSS PSF at the pixel level, which, due to the speed of both the model evaluation and the parameter estimation, offers good prospects for incorporating our method into the $MCCL$ framework.
  • Upcoming weak lensing surveys will probe large fractions of the sky with unprecedented accuracy. To infer cosmological constraints, a large ensemble of survey simulations are required to accurately model cosmological observables and their covariances. We develop a parallelized multi-lens-plane pipeline called UFalcon, designed to generate full-sky weak lensing maps from lightcones within a minimal runtime. It makes use of L-PICOLA, an approximate numerical code, which provides a fast and accurate alternative to cosmological $N$-Body simulations. The UFalcon maps are constructed by nesting 2 simulations covering a redshift-range from $z=0.1$ to $1.5$ without replicating the simulation volume. We compute the convergence and projected overdensity maps for L-PICOLA in the lightcone or snapshot mode. The generation of such a map, including the L-PICOLA simulation, takes about 3 hours walltime on 220 cores. We use the maps to calculate the spherical harmonic power spectra, which we compare to theoretical predictions and to UFalcon results generated using the full $N$-Body code GADGET-2. We then compute the covariance matrix of the full-sky spherical harmonic power spectra using 150 UFalcon maps based on L-PICOLA in lightcone mode. We consider the PDF, the higher-order moments and the variance of the smoothed field variance to quantify the accuracy of the covariance matrix, which we find to be a few percent for scales $\ell \sim 10^2$ to $10^3$. We test the impact of this level of accuracy on cosmological constraints using an optimistic survey configuration, and find that the final results are robust to this level of uncertainty. The speed and accuracy of our developed pipeline provides a basis to also include further important features such as masking, varying noise and will allow us to compute covariance matrices for models beyond $\Lambda$CDM. [abridged]
  • We explore a new technique to measure cosmic shear using Einstein rings. In Birrer et al. (2017), we showed that the detailed modelling of Einstein rings can be used to measure external shear to high precision. In this letter, we explore how a collection of Einstein rings can be used as a statistical probe of cosmic shear. We present a forecast of the cosmic shear information available in Einstein rings for different strong lensing survey configurations. We find that, assuming that the number density of Einstein rings in the COSMOS survey is representative, future strong lensing surveys should have a cosmological precision comparable to the current ground based weak lensing surveys. We discuss how this technique is complementary to the standard cosmic shear analyses since it is sensitive to different systematic and can be used for cross-calibration.
  • Assessing the consistency of parameter constraints derived from different cosmological probes is an important way to test the validity of the underlying cosmological model. In an earlier work [Nicola et al., 2017], we computed constraints on cosmological parameters for $\Lambda$CDM from an integrated analysis of CMB temperature anisotropies and CMB lensing from Planck, galaxy clustering and weak lensing from SDSS, weak lensing from DES SV as well as Type Ia supernovae and Hubble parameter measurements. In this work, we extend this analysis and quantify the concordance between the derived constraints and those derived by the Planck Collaboration as well as WMAP9, SPT and ACT. As a measure for consistency, we use the Surprise statistic [Seehars et al., 2014], which is based on the relative entropy. In the framework of a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model, we find all data sets to be consistent with one another at a level of less than 1$\sigma$. We highlight that the relative entropy is sensitive to inconsistencies in the models that are used in different parts of the analysis. In particular, inconsistent assumptions for the neutrino mass break its invariance on the parameter choice. When consistent model assumptions are used, the data sets considered in this work all agree with each other and $\Lambda$CDM, without evidence for tensions.
  • As wide-field surveys yield ever more precise measurements, cosmology has entered a phase of high precision requiring highly accurate and fast theoretical predictions. At the heart of most cosmological model predictions is a numerical solution of the Einstein-Boltzmann equations governing the evolution of linear perturbations in the Universe. We present PyCosmo, a new Python-based framework to solve this set of equations using a special pur- pose solver based on symbolic manipulations, automatic generation of C++ code and sparsity optimisation. The code uses a consistency relation of the field equations to adapt the time step and does not rely on physical approximations for speed-up. After reviewing the system of first-order linear homogeneous differential equations to be solved, we describe the numerical scheme implemented in PyCosmo. We then compare the predictions and performance of the code for the computation of the transfer functions of cosmological perturbations and compare it to existing cosmological Boltzmann codes. We find that we achieve comparable execution times for comparable accuracies. While PyCosmo does not yet have all the features of other codes, our approach is complementary to existing cosmological Boltzmann solvers and can be used as an independent test of their numerical solutions. The symbolic representation of the Einstein-Boltzmann equation system in PyCosmo provides a convenient interface for implementing extended cosmological models. We also discuss how the PyCosmo framework can also be used as a general framework to compute cosmological quantities as well as observables for both interactive and high-performance batch jobs applications. Information about the PyCosmo package and future code releases are available at http://www.cosmology.ethz.ch/research/software-lab.html.
  • Determining the redshift distribution $n(z)$ of galaxy samples is essential for several cosmological probes including weak lensing. For imaging surveys, this is usually done using photometric redshifts estimated on an object-by-object basis. We present a new approach for directly measuring the global $n(z)$ of cosmological galaxy samples, including uncertainties, using forward modeling. Our method relies on image simulations produced using UFig (Ultra Fast Image Generator) and on ABC (Approximate Bayesian Computation) within the $MCCL$ (Monte-Carlo Control Loops) framework. The galaxy population is modeled using parametric forms for the luminosity functions, spectral energy distributions, sizes and radial profiles of both blue and red galaxies. We apply exactly the same analysis to the real data and to the simulated images, which also include instrumental and observational effects. By adjusting the parameters of the simulations, we derive a set of acceptable models that are statistically consistent with the data. We then apply the same cuts to the simulations that were used to construct the target galaxy sample in the real data. The redshifts of the galaxies in the resulting simulated samples yield a set of $n(z)$ distributions for the acceptable models. We demonstrate the method by determining $n(z)$ for a cosmic shear like galaxy sample from the 4-band Subaru Suprime-Cam data in the COSMOS field. We also complement this imaging data with a spectroscopic calibration sample from the VVDS survey. We compare our resulting posterior $n(z)$ distributions to the one derived from photometric redshifts estimated using 36 photometric bands in COSMOS and find good agreement. This offers good prospects for applying our approach to current and future large imaging surveys.
  • Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) is a method to obtain a posterior distribution without a likelihood function, using simulations and a set of distance metrics. For that reason, it has recently been gaining popularity as an analysis tool in cosmology and astrophysics. Its drawback, however, is a slow convergence rate. We propose a novel method, which we call qABC, to accelerate ABC with Quantile Regression. In this method, we create a model of quantiles of distance measure as a function of input parameters. This model is trained on a small number of simulations and estimates which regions of the prior space are likely to be accepted into the posterior. Other regions are then immediately rejected. This procedure is then repeated as more simulations are available. We apply it to the practical problem of estimation of redshift distribution of cosmological samples, using forward modelling developed in previous work. The qABC method converges to nearly same posterior as the basic ABC. It uses, however, only 20\% of the number of simulations compared to basic ABC, achieving a fivefold gain in execution time for our problem. For other problems the acceleration rate may vary; it depends on how close the prior is to the final posterior. We discuss possible improvements and extensions to this method.
  • Weak Gravitational Lensing is a powerful probe of the dark sector of the Universe. One of the main challenges for this technique is the treatment of systematics in the measurement of cosmic shear from galaxy shapes. In an earlier work, Refregier & Amara (2014) have proposed the Monte Carlo Control Loops (MCCL) to overcome these effects using a forward modeling approach. We focus here on one of the control loops in this method, the task of which is the calibration of the shear measurement. For this purpose, we first consider the requirements on the shear systematics for a given survey and propagate them to different systematics terms. We use two one-point statistics to calibrate the shear measurement and six further one-point statistics as diagnostics. We also propagate the systematics levels that we estimate from the one-point functions to the two-point functions for the different systematic error sources. This allows us to assess the consistency between the systematics levels measured in different ways. To test the method, we construct synthetic sky surveys with an area of 1,700 deg$^2$. With some simplifying assumptions, we are able to meet the requirements on the shear calibration for this survey configuration. Furthermore, we account for the total residual shear systematics in terms of the contributing sources. We discuss how this MCCL framework can be applied to current and future weak lensing surveys.
  • We demonstrate the potential of Deep Learning methods for measurements of cosmological parameters from density fields, focusing on the extraction of non-Gaussian information. We consider weak lensing mass maps as our dataset. We aim for our method to be able to distinguish between five models, which were chosen to lie along the $\sigma_8$ - $\Omega_m$ degeneracy, and have nearly the same two-point statistics. We design and implement a Deep Convolutional Neural Network (DCNN) which learns the relation between five cosmological models and the mass maps they generate. We develop a new training strategy which ensures the good performance of the network for high levels of noise. We compare the performance of this approach to commonly used non-Gaussian statistics, namely the skewness and kurtosis of the convergence maps. We find that our implementation of DCNN outperforms the skewness and kurtosis statistics, especially for high noise levels. The network maintains the mean discrimination efficiency greater than $85\%$ even for noise levels corresponding to ground based lensing observations, while the other statistics perform worse in this setting, achieving efficiency less than $70\%$. This demonstrates the ability of CNN-based methods to efficiently break the $\sigma_8$ - $\Omega_m$ degeneracy with weak lensing mass maps alone. We discuss the potential of this method to be applied to the analysis of real weak lensing data and other datasets.
  • We fit a log-normal function to the M dwarf orbital surface density distribution of gas giant planets, over the mass range 1-10 times that of Jupiter, from 0.07-400 AU. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach to explore the likelihoods of various parameter values consistent with point estimates of the data given our assumed functional form. This fit is consistent with radial velocity, microlensing, and direct imaging observations, is well-motivated from theoretical and phenomenological viewpoints, and makes predictions of future surveys. We present probability distributions for each parameter as well as a Maximum Likelihood Estimate solution. We suggest this function makes more physical sense than other widely used functions, and explore the implications of our results on the design of future exoplanet surveys.
  • We report on SPT-CLJ2011-5228, a giant system of arcs created by a cluster at $z=1.06$. The arc system is notable for the presence of a bright central image. The source is a Lyman Break galaxy at $z_s=2.39$ and the mass enclosed within the 14 arc second radius Einstein ring is $10^{14.2}$ solar masses. We perform a full light profile reconstruction of the lensed images to precisely infer the parameters of the mass distribution. The brightness of the central image demands that the central total density profile of the lens be shallow. By fitting the dark matter as a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile---with a free parameter for the inner density slope---we find that the break radius is $270^{+48}_{-76}$ kpc, and that the inner density falls with radius to the power $-0.38\pm0.04$ at 68 percent confidence. Such a shallow profile is in strong tension with our understanding of relaxed cold dark matter halos; dark matter only simulations predict the inner density should fall as $r^{-1}$. The tension can be alleviated if this cluster is in fact a merger; a two halo model can also reconstruct the data, with both clumps (density going as $r^{-0.8}$ and $r^{-1.0}$) much more consistent with predictions from dark matter only simulations. At the resolution of our Dark Energy Survey imaging, we are unable to choose between these two models, but we make predictions for forthcoming Hubble Space Telescope imaging that will decisively distinguish between them.
  • We study the substructure content of the strong gravitational lens RXJ1131-1231 through a forward modelling approach that relies on generating an extensive suite of realistic simulations. We use a semi-analytic merger tree prescription that allows us to stochastically generate substructure populations whose properties depend on the dark matter particle mass. These synthetic halos are then used as lenses to produce realistic mock images that have the same features, e.g. luminous arcs, quasar positions, instrumental noise and PSF, as the data. We then analyse the data and the simulations in the same way with summary statistics that are sensitive to the signal being targeted and are able to constrain models of dark matter statistically using Approximate Bayesian Computing (ABC) techniques. In this work, we focus on the thermal relic mass estimate and fix the semi-analytic descriptions of the substructure evolution based on recent literature. We are able, based on the HST data for RXJ1131-1231, to rule out a warm dark matter thermal relic mass below 2 keV at the 2$\sigma$ confidence level.
  • We present a simple method to accurately infer line of sight (LOS) integrated lensing effects for galaxy scale strong lens systems through image reconstruction. Our approach enables us to separate weak lensing LOS effects from the main strong lens deflector. We test our method using mock data and show that strong lens systems can be accurate probes of cosmic shear with a precision on the shear terms of $\pm 0.003$ (statistical error) for an HST-like dataset. We apply our formalism to reconstruct the lens COSMOS 0038+4133 and its LOS. In addition, we estimate the LOS properties with a halo-rendering estimate based on the COSMOS field galaxies and a galaxy-halo connection. The two approaches are independent and complementary in their information content. We find that when estimating the convergence at the strong lens system, performing a joint analysis improves the measure by a factor of two compared to a halo model only analysis. Furthermore the constraints of the strong lens reconstruction lead to tighter constraints on the halo masses of the LOS galaxies. Joint constraints of multiple strong lens systems may add valuable information to the galaxy-halo connection and may allow independent weak lensing shear measurement calibrations.
  • We extend the results of previous analyses towards constraining the abundance and clustering of post-reionization ($z \sim 0-5$) neutral hydrogen (HI) systems using a halo model framework. We work with a comprehensive HI dataset including the small-scale clustering, column density and mass function of HI galaxies at low redshifts, intensity mapping measurements at intermediate redshifts and the UV/optical observations of Damped Lyman Alpha (DLA) systems at higher redshifts. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to constrain the parameters of the best-fitting models, both for the HI-halo mass relation and the HI radial density profile. We find that a radial exponential profile results in a good fit to the low-redshift HI observations, including the clustering and the column density distribution. The form of the profile is also found to match the high-redshift DLA observations, when used in combination with a three-parameter HI-halo mass relation and a redshift evolution in the HI concentration. The halo model predictions are in good agreement with the observed HI surface density profiles of low-redshift galaxies, and the general trends in the the impact parameter and covering fraction observations of high-redshift DLAs. We provide convenient tables summarizing the best-fit halo model predictions.
  • Recent progress in cosmology has relied on combining different cosmological probes. In earlier work, we implemented an integrated approach to cosmology where the probes are combined into a common framework at the map level. This has the advantage of taking full account of the correlations between the different probes, to provide a stringent test of systematics and of the validity of the cosmological model. We extend this analysis to include not only CMB temperature, galaxy clustering, weak lensing from SDSS but also CMB lensing, weak lensing from the DES SV survey, Type Ia SNe and $H_{0}$ measurements. This yields 12 auto- and cross-power spectra as well as background probes. Furthermore, we extend the treatment of systematic uncertainties. For $\Lambda$CDM, we find results that are consistent with our earlier work. Given our enlarged data set and systematics treatment, this confirms the robustness of our analysis and results. Furthermore, we find that our best-fit cosmological model gives a good fit to the data we consider with no signs of tensions within our analysis. We also find our constraints to be consistent with those found by WMAP9, SPT and ACT and the KiDS weak lensing survey. Comparing with the Planck Collaboration results, we see a broad agreement, but there are indications of a tension from the marginalized constraints in most pairs of cosmological parameters. Since our analysis includes CMB temperature Planck data at $10 < \ell < 610$, the tension appears to arise between the Planck high$-\ell$ and the other measurements. Furthermore, we find the constraints on the probe calibration parameters to be in agreement with expectations, showing that the data sets are mutually consistent. In particular, this yields a confirmation of the amplitude calibration of the weak lensing measurements from SDSS, DES SV and Planck CMB lensing from our integrated analysis. [abridged]
  • As several large single-dish radio surveys begin operation within the coming decade, a wealth of radio data will become available and provide a new window to the Universe. In order to fully exploit the potential of these data sets, it is important to understand the systematic effects associated with the instrument and the analysis pipeline. A common approach to tackle this is to forward-model the entire system - from the hardware to the analysis of the data products. For this purpose, we introduce two newly developed, open-source Python packages: the HI Data Emulator (HIDE) and the Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer (SEEK) for simulating and processing single-dish radio survey data. HIDE forward-models the process of collecting astronomical radio signals in a single-dish radio telescope instrument and outputs pixel-level time-ordered-data. SEEK processes the time-ordered-data, removes artifacts from Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), automatically applies flux calibration, and aims to recover the astronomical radio signal. The two packages can be used separately or together depending on the application. Their modular and flexible nature allows easy adaptation to other instruments and data sets. We describe the basic architecture of the two packages and examine in detail the noise and RFI modeling in HIDE, as well as the implementation of gain calibration and RFI mitigation in SEEK. We then apply HIDE & SEEK to forward-model a Galactic survey in the frequency range 990 - 1260 MHz based on data taken at the Bleien Observatory. For this survey, we expect to cover 70% of the full sky and achieve a median signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 5 - 6 in the cleanest channels including systematic uncertainties. However, we also point out the potential challenges of high RFI contamination and baseline removal when examining the early data from the Bleien Observatory.
  • Recent observational progress has led to the establishment of the standard $\Lambda$CDM model for cosmology. This development is based on different cosmological probes that are usually combined through their likelihoods at the latest stage in the analysis. We implement here an integrated scheme for cosmological probes, which are combined in a common framework starting at the map level. This treatment is necessary as the probes are generally derived from overlapping maps and are thus not independent. It also allows for a thorough test of the cosmological model and of systematics through the consistency of different physical tracers. As a first application, we combine current measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the Planck satellite, and galaxy clustering and weak lensing from SDSS. We consider the spherical harmonic power spectra of these probes including all six auto- and cross-correlations along with the associated full Gaussian covariance matrix. This provides an integrated treatment of different analyses usually performed separately including CMB anisotropies, cosmic shear, galaxy clustering, galaxy-galaxy lensing and the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect with galaxy and shear tracers. We derive constraints on $\Lambda$CDM parameters that are compatible with existing constraints and highlight tensions between data sets, which become apparent in this integrated treatment. We discuss how this approach provides a complete and powerful integrated framework for probe combination and how it can be extended to include other tracers in the context of current and future wide field cosmological surveys.