• The NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program's SAG15 group has solicited, collected, and organized community input on high-level science questions that could be addressed with future direct imaging exoplanet missions and the type and quality of data answering these questions will require. Input was solicited through a variety of forums and the report draft was shared with the exoplanet community continuously during the period of the report development (Nov 2015 -- May 2017). The report benefitted from the input of over 50 exoplanet scientists and from multiple open-forum discussions at exoplanet and astrobiology meetings. The SAG15 team has identified three group of high-level questions, those that focus on the properties of planetary systems (Questions A1--A2), those that focus on the properties of individual planets (Questions B1--B4), and questions that relate to planetary processes (Questions C1--C4). The questions in categories A, B, and C require different target samples and often different observational approaches. For each questions we summarize the current body of knowledge, the available and future observational approaches that can directly or indirectly contribute to answering the question, and provide examples and general considerations for the target sample required.
  • We report near-infrared measurements of the terminator region transmission spectrum and dayside emission spectrum of the exoplanet WASP-12b obtained using the HST WFC3 instrument. The disk-average dayside brightness temperature averages about 2900 K, peaking to 3200 K around 1.46 microns. We modeled a range of atmospheric cases for both the emission and transmission spectrum and confirm the recent finding by Crossfield et al. (2012b) that there is no evidence for C/O >1 in the atmosphere of WASP-12b. Assuming a physically plausible atmosphere, we find evidence that the presence of a number of molecules is consistent with the data, but the justification for inclusion of these opacity sources based on the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) is marginal. We also find the near-infrared primary eclipse light curve is consistent with small amounts of prolate distortion. As part of the calibration effort for these data, we conducted a detailed study of instrument systematics using 65 orbits of WFC3-IR grims observations. The instrument systematics are dominated by detector-related affects, which vary significantly depending on the detector readout mode. The 256x256 subarray observations of WASP 12 produced spectral measurements within 15% of the photon-noise limit using a simple calibration approach. Residual systematics are estimated to be less than 70 parts per million.