• An imperative condition for the functioning of a power-grid network is that its power generators remain synchronized. Disturbances can prompt desynchronization, which is a process that has been involved in large power outages. Here we derive a condition under which the desired synchronous state of a power grid is stable, and use this condition to identify tunable parameters of the generators that are determinants of spontaneous synchronization. Our analysis gives rise to an approach to specify parameter assignments that can enhance synchronization of any given network, which we demonstrate for a selection of both test systems and real power grids. Because our results concern spontaneous synchronization, they are relevant both for reducing dependence on conventional control devices, thus offering an additional layer of protection given that most power outages involve equipment or operational errors, and for contributing to the development of "smart grids" that can recover from failures in real time.
  • The understanding of cascading failures in complex systems has been hindered by the lack of realistic large-scale modeling and analysis that can account for variable system conditions. Here, using the North American power grid, we identify, quantify, and analyze the set of network components that are vulnerable to cascading failures under any out of multiple conditions. We show that the vulnerable set consists of a small but topologically central portion of the network and that large cascades are disproportionately more likely to be triggered by initial failures close to this set. These results elucidate aspects of the origins and causes of cascading failures relevant for grid design and operation, and demonstrate vulnerability analysis methods that are applicable to a wider class of cascade-prone networks.
  • In previously identified forms of remote synchronization between two nodes, the intermediate portion of the network connecting the two nodes is not synchronized with them but generally exhibits some coherent dynamics. Here we report on a network phenomenon we call incoherence-mediated remote synchronization (IMRS), in which two non-contiguous parts of the network are identically synchronized while the dynamics of the intermediate part is statistically and information-theoretically incoherent. We identify mirror symmetry in the network structure as a mechanism allowing for such behavior, and show that IMRS is robust against dynamical noise as well as against parameter changes. IMRS may underlie neuronal information processing and potentially lead to network solutions for encryption key distribution and secure communication.
  • The defining property of chimera states is the coexistence of coherent and incoherent domains in systems that are structurally and spatially homogeneous. The recent realization that such states might be common in oscillator networks raises the question of whether an analogous phenomenon can occur in continuous media. Here, we show that chimera states can exist in continuous systems even when the coupling is strictly local, as in many fluid and pattern forming media. Using the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation as a model system, we characterize chimera states consisting of a coherent domain of a frozen spiral structure and an incoherent domain of amplitude turbulence. We show that in this case, in contrast with discrete network systems, fluctuations in the local coupling field play a crucial role in limiting the coherent regions. We suggest these findings shed light on new possible forms of coexisting order and disorder in fluid systems.
  • A large variety of dynamical systems, such as chemical and biomolecular systems, can be seen as networks of nonlinear entities. Prediction, control, and identification of such nonlinear networks require knowledge of the state of the system. However, network states are usually unknown, and only a fraction of the state variables are directly measurable. The observability problem concerns reconstructing the network state from this limited information. Here, we propose a general optimization-based approach for observing the states of nonlinear networks and for optimally selecting the observed variables. Our results reveal several fundamental limitations in network observability, such as the trade-off between the fraction of observed variables and the observation length on one side, and the estimation error on the other side. We also show that owing to the crucial role played by the dynamics, purely graph- theoretic observability approaches cannot provide conclusions about one's practical ability to estimate the states. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods by finding the key components in biological and combustion reaction networks from which we determine the full system state. Our results can lead to the design of novel sensing principles that can greatly advance prediction and control of the dynamics of such networks.
  • The relation between network structure and dynamics is determinant for the behavior of complex systems in numerous domains. An important longstanding problem concerns the properties of the networks that optimize the dynamics with respect to a given performance measure. Here we show that such optimization can lead to sensitive dependence of the dynamics on the structure of the network. Specifically, using diffusively coupled systems as examples, we demonstrate that the stability of a dynamical state can exhibit sensitivity to unweighted structural perturbations (i.e., link removals and node additions) for undirected optimal networks and to weighted perturbations (i.e., small changes in link weights) for directed optimal networks. As mechanisms underlying this sensitivity, we identify discontinuous transitions occurring in the complement of undirected optimal networks and the prevalence of eigenvector degeneracy in directed optimal networks. These findings establish a unified characterization of networks optimized for dynamical stability, which we illustrate using Turing instability in activator-inhibitor systems, synchronization in power-grid networks, network diffusion, and several other network processes. Our results suggest that the network structure of a complex system operating near an optimum can potentially be fine-tuned for a significantly enhanced stability compared to what one might expect from simple extrapolation. On the other hand, they also suggest constraints on how close to the optimum the system can be in practice. Finally, the results have potential implications for biophysical networks, which have evolved under the competing pressures of optimizing fitness while remaining robust against perturbations.
  • Cluster synchronization is a phenomenon in which a network self-organizes into a pattern of synchronized sets. It has been shown that diverse patterns of stable cluster synchronization can be captured by symmetries of the network. Here we establish a theoretical basis to divide an arbitrary pattern of symmetry clusters into independently synchronizable cluster sets, in which the synchronization stability of the individual clusters in each set is decoupled from that in all the other sets. Using this framework, we suggest a new approach to find permanently stable chimera states by capturing two or more symmetry clusters---at least one stable and one unstable---that compose the entire fully symmetric network.
  • A scenario has recently been reported in which in order to stabilize complete synchronization of an oscillator network---a symmetric state---the symmetry of the system itself has to be broken by making the oscillators nonidentical. But how often does such behavior---which we term asymmetry-induced synchronization (AISync)---occur in oscillator networks? Here we present the first general scheme for constructing AISync systems and demonstrate that this behavior is the norm rather than the exception in a wide class of physical systems that can be seen as multilayer networks. Since a symmetric network in complete synchrony is the basic building block of cluster synchronization in more general networks, AISync should be common also in facilitating cluster synchronization by breaking the symmetry of the cluster subnetworks.
  • Traditional studies of chaos in conservative and driven dissipative systems have established a correspondence between sensitive dependence on initial conditions and fractal basin boundaries, but much less is known about the relation between geometry and dynamics in undriven dissipative systems. These systems can exhibit a prevalent form of complex dynamics, dubbed doubly transient chaos because not only typical trajectories but also the (otherwise invariant) chaotic saddles are transient. This property, along with a manifest lack of scale invariance, has hindered the study of the geometric properties of basin boundaries in these systems--most remarkably, the very question of whether they are fractal across all scales has yet to be answered. Here we derive a general dynamical condition that answers this question, which we use to demonstrate that the basin boundaries can indeed form a true fractal; in fact, they do so generically in a broad class of transiently chaotic undriven dissipative systems. Using physical examples, we demonstrate that the boundaries typically form a slim fractal, which we define as a set whose dimension at a given resolution decreases when the resolution is increased. To properly characterize such sets, we introduce the notion of equivalent dimension for quantifying their relation with sensitive dependence on initial conditions at all scales. We show that slim fractal boundaries can exhibit complex geometry even when they do not form a true fractal and fractal scaling is observed only above a certain length scale at each boundary point. Thus, our results reveal slim fractals as a geometrical hallmark of transient chaos in undriven dissipative systems.
  • In the fluid transport of particles, it is generally expected that heavy particles carried by a laminar fluid flow moving downward will also move downward. We establish a theory to show, however, that particles can be dynamically levitated and lifted by interacting vortices in such flows, thereby moving against gravity and the asymptotic direction of the flow, even when they are orders of magnitude denser than the fluid. The particle levitation is rigorously demonstrated for potential flows and supported by simulations for viscous flows. We suggest that this counterintuitive effect has potential implications for the air-transport of water droplets and the lifting of sediments in water.
  • In a network, a local disturbance can propagate and eventually cause a substantial part of the system to fail, in cascade events that are easy to conceptualize but extraordinarily difficult to predict. Here, we develop a statistical framework that can predict cascade size distributions by incorporating two ingredients only: the vulnerability of individual components and the co-susceptibility of groups of components (i.e., their tendency to fail together). Using cascades in power grids as a representative example, we show that correlations between component failures define structured and often surprisingly large groups of co-susceptible components. Aside from their implications for blackout studies, these results provide insights and a new modeling framework for understanding cascades in financial systems, food webs, and complex networks in general.
  • A characteristic property of networks is their ability to propagate influences, such as infectious diseases, behavioral changes, and failures. An especially important class of such contagious dynamics is that of cascading processes. These processes include, for example, cascading failures in infrastructure systems, extinctions cascades in ecological networks, and information cascades in social systems. In this review, we discuss recent progress and challenges associated with the modeling, prediction, detection, and control of cascades in networks.
  • Spontaneous synchronization has long served as a paradigm for behavioral uniformity that can emerge from interactions in complex systems. When the interacting entities are identical and their coupling patterns are also identical, the complete synchronization of the entire network is the state inheriting the system symmetry. As in other systems subject to symmetry breaking, such symmetric states are not always stable. Here we report on the discovery of the converse of symmetry breaking--the scenario in which complete synchronization is not stable for identically-coupled identical oscillators but becomes stable when, and only when, the oscillator parameters are judiciously tuned to nonidentical values, thereby breaking the system symmetry to preserve the state symmetry. Aside from demonstrating that diversity can facilitate and even be required for uniformity and consensus, this suggests a mechanism for convergent forms of pattern formation in which initially asymmetric patterns evolve into symmetric ones.
  • The study of synchronization of coupled systems is currently undergoing a major surge fueled by recent discoveries of new forms of collective dynamics and the development of techniques to characterize a myriad of new patterns of network synchronization. This includes chimera states, phenomena determined by symmetry, remote synchronization, and asymmetry-induced synchronization. This Focus Issue presents a selection of contributions at the forefront of these developments, to which this introduction is intended to offer an up-to-date foundation.
  • An increasing number of complex systems are now modeled as networks of coupled dynamical entities. Nonlinearity and high-dimensionality are hallmarks of the dynamics of such networks but have generally been regarded as obstacles to control. Here I discuss recent advances on mathematical and computational approaches to control high-dimensional nonlinear network dynamics under general constraints on the admissible interventions. I also discuss the potential of network control to address pressing scientific problems in various disciplines.
  • Noise caused by fluctuations at the molecular level is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here we present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. We apply this methodology to models of cell differentiation and show how predicted manipulations of tunable factors can induce lineage changes, and further utilize it to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy in a cell death pathway model. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating biophysical dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of noisy complex networks.
  • The abundance of a species' population in an ecosystem is rarely stationary, often exhibiting large fluctuations over time. Using historical data on marine species, we show that the year-to-year fluctuations of population growth rate obey a well-defined double-exponential (Laplace) distribution. This striking regularity allows us to devise a stochastic model despite seemingly irregular variations in population abundances. The model identifies the effect of reduced growth at low population density as a key factor missed in current approaches of population variability analysis and without which extinction risks are severely underestimated. The model also allows us to separate the effect of demographic stochasticity and show that single-species growth rates are dominantly determined by stochasticity common to all species. This dominance---and the implications it has for interspecies correlations, including co-extinctions---emphasizes the need of ecosystem-level management approaches to reduce the extinction risk of the individual species themselves.
  • Real-world systems are often complex, dynamic, and nonlinear. Understanding the dynamics of a system from its observed time series is key to the prediction and control of the system's behavior. While most existing techniques tacitly assume some form of stationarity or continuity, abrupt changes, which are often due to external disturbances or sudden changes in the intrinsic dynamics, are common in time series. Structural breaks, which are time points at which the statistical patterns of a time series change, pose considerable challenges to data analysis. Without identification of such break points, the same dynamic rule would be applied to the whole period of observation, whereas false identification of structural breaks may lead to overfitting. In this paper, we cast the problem of decomposing a time series into its trend and seasonal components as an optimization problem. This problem is ill-posed due to the arbitrariness in the number of parameters. To overcome this difficulty, we propose the addition of a penalty function (i.e., a regularization term) that accounts for the number of parameters. Our approach simultaneously identifies seasonality and trend without the need of iterations, and allows the reliable detection of structural breaks. The method is applied to recorded data on fish populations and sea surface temperature, where it detects structural breaks that would have been neglected otherwise. This suggests that our method can lead to a general approach for the monitoring, prediction, and prevention of structural changes in real systems.
  • The dynamics of power-grid networks is becoming an increasingly active area of research within the physics and network science communities. The results from such studies are typically insightful and illustrative, but are often based on simplifying assumptions that can be either difficult to assess or not fully justified for realistic applications. Here we perform a comprehensive comparative analysis of three leading models recently used to study synchronization dynamics in power-grid networks -- a fundamental problem of practical significance given that frequency synchronization of all power generators in the same interconnection is a necessary condition for a power grid to operate. We show that each of these models can be derived from first principles within a common framework based on the classical model of a generator, thereby clarifying all assumptions involved. This framework allows us to view power grids as complex networks of coupled second-order phase oscillators with both forcing and damping terms. Using simple illustrative examples, test systems, and real power-grid datasets, we study the inherent frequencies of the oscillators as well as their coupling structure, comparing across the different models. We demonstrate, in particular, that if the network structure is not homogeneous, generators with identical parameters need to be modeled as non-identical oscillators in general. We also discuss an approach to estimate the required (dynamical) parameters that are unavailable in typical power-grid datasets, their use for computing the constants of each of the three models, and an open-source MATLAB toolbox that we provide for these computations.
  • Recent numerical results on advection dynamics have shown that particles denser than the fluid can remain trapped indefinitely in a bounded region of an open fluid flow. Here, we investigate this counterintuitive phenomenon both numerically and analytically to establish the conditions under which the underlying particle-trapping attractors can form. We focus on a two-dimensional open flow composed of a pair of vortices and its specular image, which is a system we represent as a vortex pair plus a wall along the symmetry line. Considering particles that are much denser than the fluid, we show that two point attractors form in the neighborhood of the vortex pair provided that the particle Stokes number is smaller than a critical value of order unity. In the absence of the wall, the boundaries of the basins of the attracting points are smooth. When the wall is present, the point attractors describe counter-rotating ellipses in this frame, with a period equal to half the period of one isolated vortex pair. However, their boundaries are shown to become fractal if the distance to the wall is smaller than a critical distance that scales with the inverse square root of the Stokes number. This transformation is related to the breakdown of a separatrix that gives rise to a heteroclinic tangle close to the vortices, which we describe using a Melnikov function. For an even smaller distance to the wall, we demonstrate that a second separatrix breaks down and a new heteroclinic tangle forms farther away from the vortices. Particles released in the open part of the flow can approach the attractors and be trapped permanently provided that they cross the two separatrices. Furthermore, the trapping of heavy particles from the open flow is shown to be robust to the presence of gravity, viscosity, and noise.
  • Chaos is an inherently dynamical phenomenon traditionally studied for trajectories that are either permanently erratic or transiently influenced by permanently erratic ones lying on a set of measure zero. The latter gives rise to the final state sensitivity observed in connection with fractal basin boundaries in conservative scattering systems and driven dissipative systems. Here we focus on the most prevalent case of undriven dissipative systems, whose transient dynamics fall outside the scope of previous studies since no time-dependent solutions can exist for asymptotically long times. We show that such systems can exhibit positive finite-time Lyapunov exponents and fractal-like basin boundaries which nevertheless have codimension one. In sharp contrast with its driven and conservative counterparts, the settling rate to the (fixed-point) attractors grows exponentially in time, meaning that the fraction of trajectories away from the attractors decays super-exponentially. While no invariant chaotic sets exist in such cases, the irregular behavior is governed by transient interactions with transient chaotic saddles, which act as effective, time-varying chaotic sets.
  • We present an algorithm for the control of complex networks and other nonlinear, high-dimensional dynamical systems. The computational approach is based on the recently-introduced concept of compensatory perturbations -- intentional alterations to the state of a complex system that can drive it to a desired target state even when there are constraints on the perturbations that forbid reaching the target state directly. Included here is ready-to-use software that can be applied to identify eligible control interventions in a general system described by coupled ordinary differential equations, whose specific form can be specified by the user. The algorithm is highly scalable, with the computational cost scaling as the number of dynamical variables to the power 2.5.
  • The control of complex networks is of paramount importance in areas as diverse as ecosystem management, emergency response, and cell reprogramming. A fundamental property of networks is that perturbations to one node can affect other nodes, potentially causing the entire system to change behavior or fail. Here, we show that it is possible to exploit the same principle to control network behavior. Our approach accounts for the nonlinear dynamics inherent to real systems, and allows bringing the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible due to constraints that limit the allowed interventions. Applications show that this framework permits reprogramming a network to a desired task as well as rescuing networks from the brink of failure---which we illustrate through the mitigation of cascading failures in a power-grid network and the identification of potential drug targets in a signaling network of human cancer.
  • In 1963 Edward Lorenz revealed deterministic predictability to be an illusion and gave birth to a field that still thrives. This Feature Article discusses Lorenz's discovery and developments that followed from it.
  • A common goal in the control of a large network is to minimize the number of driver nodes or control inputs. Yet, the physical determination of control signals and the properties of the resulting control trajectories remain widely under-explored. Here we show that: (i) numerical control fails in practice even for linear systems if the controllability Gramian is ill-conditioned, which occurs frequently even when existing controllability criteria are satisfied unambiguously; (ii) the control trajectories are generally nonlocal in the phase space, and their lengths are strongly anti-correlated with the numerical success rate and number of control inputs; (iii) numerical success rate increases abruptly from zero to nearly one as the number of control inputs is increased, a transformation we term numerical controllability transition. This reveals a trade-off between nonlocality of the control trajectory in the phase space and nonlocality of the control inputs in the network itself. The failure of numerical control cannot be overcome in general by merely increasing numerical precision---successful control requires instead increasing the number of control inputs beyond the numerical controllability transition.