• The concept of pseudomagnitude was recently introduced by Chelli et al. (2016), to estimate apparent stellar diameters using a strictly observational methodology. Pseudomagnitudes are distance indicators, which have the remarkable property of being reddening free. In this study, we use Hipparcos parallax measurements to compute the mean absolute pseudomagnitudes of solar neighbourhood dwarf stars as a function of their spectral type. To illustrate the use of absolute pseudomagnitudes, we derive the distance moduli of $360$ Pleiades stars and find that the centroid of their distribution is $5.715\pm0.018$, corresponding to a distance of $139.0\pm1.2$\,pc. We locate the subset of $\sim 50$ Pleiades stars observed by Hipparcos at a mean distance of $135.5\pm3.7$\,pc, thus confirming the frequently reported anomaly in the Hipparcos measurements of these stars.
  • The diameter of a star is a major observable that serves to test the validity of stellar structure theories. It is also a difficult observable that is mostly obtained with indirect methods since the stars are so remote. Today only ~600 apparent star diameters have been measured by direct methods: optical interferometry and lunar occultations. Accurate star diameters are now required in the new field of exoplanet studies, since they condition the planets' sizes in transit observations, and recent publications illustrate a visible renewal of interest in this topic. Our analysis is based on the modeling of the relationship between measured angular diameters and photometries. It makes use of two new reddening-free concepts: a distance indicator called pseudomagnitude, and a quasi-experimental observable that is independent of distance and specific to each star, called the differential surface brightness (DSB). The use of all the published measurements of apparent diameters that have been collected so far, and a careful modeling of the DSB allow us to estimate star diameters with a median statistical error of 1%, knowing their spectral type and, in the present case, the VJHKs photometries. We introduce two catalogs, the JMMC Measured Diameters Catalog (JMDC), containing measured star diameters, and the second version of the JMMC Stellar Diameter Catalog (JSDC), augmented to about 453000 star diameters. Finally, we provide simple formulas and a table of coefficients to quickly estimate stellar angular diameters and associated errors from (V, Ks) magnitudes and spectral types.
  • We present high spectral resolution aperture-synthesis imaging of the red supergiant Antares (alpha Sco) in individual CO first overtone lines with VLTI/AMBER. The reconstructed images reveal that the star appears differently in the blue wing, line center, and red wing and shows an asymmetrically extended component. The appearance of the star within the CO lines changes drastically within one year, implying a significant change in the velocity field in the atmosphere. Our modeling suggests an outer atmosphere (MOLsphere) extending to 1.2--1.4 stellar radii with CO column densities of (0.5--1)x10^{20} cm^{-2} and a temperature of ~2000 K. While the velocity field in 2009 is characterized by strong upwelling motions at 20--30 km/s, it changed to strong downdrafts in 2010. On the other hand, the AMBER data in the continuum show only a slight deviation from limb-darkened disks and only marginal time variations. We derive a limb-darkened disk diameter of 37.38+/-0.06 mas and a power-law-type limb-darkening parameter of (8.7+/-1.6)x10^{-2} (2009) and 37.31+/-0.09 mas and (1.5+/-0.2)x10^{-1} (2010). We also obtain Teff = 3660+/-120 K and log L/Lsun = 4.88+/-0.23, which suggests a mass of 15+/-5 Msun with an age of 11-15 Myr. This age is consistent with the recently estimated age for the Upper Scorpius OB association. The properties of the outer atmosphere of Antares are similar to those of another well-studied red supergiant, Betelgeuse. The density of the extended outer atmosphere of Antares and Betelgeuse is higher than predicted by the current 3-D convection simulations by at least six orders of magnitude, implying that convection alone cannot explain the formation of the extended outer atmosphere.
  • (abridged) A complete census of planetary systems around a volume-limited sample of solar-type stars (FGK dwarfs) in the Solar neighborhood with uniform sensitivity down to Earth-mass planets within their Habitable Zones out to several AUs would be a major milestone in extrasolar planets astrophysics. This fundamental goal can be achieved with a mission concept such as NEAT - the Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope. NEAT is designed to carry out space-borne extremely-high-precision astrometric measurements sufficient to detect dynamical effects due to orbiting planets of mass even lower than Earth's around the nearest stars. Such a survey mission would provide the actual planetary masses and the full orbital geometry for all the components of the detected planetary systems down to the Earth-mass limit. The NEAT performance limits can be achieved by carrying out differential astrometry between the targets and a set of suitable reference stars in the field. The NEAT instrument design consists of an off-axis parabola single-mirror telescope, a detector with a large field of view made of small movable CCDs located around a fixed central CCD, and an interferometric calibration system originating from metrology fibers located at the primary mirror. The proposed mission architecture relies on the use of two satellites operating at L2 for 5 years, flying in formation and offering a capability of more than 20,000 reconfigurations (alternative option uses deployable boom). The NEAT primary science program will encompass an astrometric survey of our 200 closest F-, G- and K-type stellar neighbors, with an average of 50 visits. The remaining time might be allocated to improve the characterization of the architecture of selected planetary systems around nearby targets of specific interest (low-mass stars, young stars, etc.) discovered by Gaia, ground-based high-precision radial-velocity surveys.
  • We present the third release of the AMBER data reduction software by the JMMC. This software is based on core algorithms optimized after several years of operation. An optional graphic interface in a high level language allows the user to control the process step by step or in a completely automatic manner. Ongoing improvement is the implementation of a robust calibration scheme, making use of the full calibration sets available during the night. The output products are standard OI-FITS files, which can be used directly in high level software like model fitting or image reconstruction tools. The software performances are illustrated on a full data set of calibrators observed with AMBER during 5 years taken in various instrumental setup.
  • We present here a new observational technique, Phase Closure Nulling (PCN), which has the potential to obtain very high contrast detection and spectroscopy of faint companions to bright stars. PCN consists in measuring closure phases of fully resolved objects with a baseline triplet where one of the baselines crosses a null of the object visibility function. For scenes dominated by the presence of a stellar disk, the correlated flux of the star around nulls is essentially canceled out, and in these regions the signature of fainter, unresolved, scene object(s) dominates the imaginary part of the visibility in particular the closure phase. We present here the basics of the PCN method, the initial proof-of-concept observation, the envisioned science cases and report about the first observing campaign made on VLTI/AMBER and CHARA/MIRC using this technique.
  • We investigate the possiblity to detect Earth-like planets, in the visible and the near infrared domains, with ground based Extremely Large Telescopes equipped with adaptive systems capable of providing high Strehl ratios. From a detailed analysis of the speckle noise, we derive analytical expressions of the signal to noise ratio on the planet flux, for direct and differential imaging, in the presence of the speckle noise and the photon noise of the residual stellar halo. We find that a 100m telescope would detect an Earth at a distance of 10pc, with a signal to noise ratio of 5, in an integration time of 12 hours. This requires to control the instrumental aberrations with a precision better than 1 nanometer rms, and to reach an image dynamics of $1.2{\rm x}10^{6}$ at $0\farcs 1$ radius. Under the same conditions, a telescope of 30m would require a dynamics of $1.3{\rm x}10^{7}$ for a positive detection