• Strong gravitational lenses with measured time delays between the multiple images allow a direct measurement of the time-delay distance to the lens, and thus a measure of cosmological parameters, particularly the Hubble constant, $H_{0}$. We present a blind lens model analysis of the quadruply-imaged quasar lens HE 0435-1223 using deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging, updated time-delay measurements from the COSmological MOnitoring of GRAvItational Lenses (COSMOGRAIL), a measurement of the velocity dispersion of the lens galaxy based on Keck data, and a characterization of the mass distribution along the line of sight. HE 0435-1223 is the third lens analyzed as a part of the $H_{0}$ Lenses in COSMOGRAIL's Wellspring (H0LiCOW) project. We account for various sources of systematic uncertainty, including the detailed treatment of nearby perturbers, the parameterization of the galaxy light and mass profile, and the regions used for lens modeling. We constrain the effective time-delay distance to be $D_{\Delta t} = 2612_{-191}^{+208}~\mathrm{Mpc}$, a precision of 7.6%. From HE 0435-1223 alone, we infer a Hubble constant of $H_{0} = 73.1_{-6.0}^{+5.7}~\mathrm{km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$ assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. The cosmographic inference based on the three lenses analyzed by H0LiCOW to date is presented in a companion paper (H0LiCOW Paper V).
  • Accurate and precise measurements of the Hubble constant are critical for testing our current standard cosmological model and revealing possibly new physics. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, each strong gravitational lens system with measured time delays can allow one to determine the Hubble constant with an uncertainty of $\sim 7\%$. Since HST will not last forever, we explore adaptive-optics (AO) imaging as an alternative that can provide higher angular resolution than HST imaging but has a less stable point spread function (PSF) due to atmospheric distortion. To make AO imaging useful for time-delay-lens cosmography, we develop a method to extract the unknown PSF directly from the imaging of strongly lensed quasars. In a blind test with two mock data sets created with different PSFs, we are able to recover the important cosmological parameters (time-delay distance, external shear, lens mass profile slope, and total Einstein radius). Our analysis of the Keck AO image of the strong lens system RXJ1131-1231 shows that the important parameters for cosmography agree with those based on HST imaging and modeling within 1-$\sigma$ uncertainties. Most importantly, the constraint on the model time-delay distance by using AO imaging with $0.045"$resolution is tighter by $\sim 50\%$ than the constraint of time-delay distance by using HST imaging with $0.09"$when a power-law mass distribution for the lens system is adopted. Our PSF reconstruction technique is generic and applicable to data sets that have multiple nearby point sources, enabling scientific studies that require high-precision models of the PSF.
  • In this work we analyze the mass distribution of MACSJ1206.2-0847, especially focusing on the halo properties of its cluster members. The cluster appears relaxed in its X-ray emission, but has significant amounts of intracluster light which is not centrally concentrated, suggesting that galaxy-scale interactions are still ongoing despite the overall relaxed state. The cluster lenses 12 background galaxies into multiple images and one galaxy at $z=1.033$ into a giant arc and its counterimage. The multiple image positions and the surface brightness distribution (SFB) of the arc which is bent around several cluster members are sensitive to the cluster galaxy halo properties. We model the cluster mass distribution with a NFW profile and the galaxy halos with two parameters for the mass normalization and extent of a reference halo assuming scalings with their observed NIR--light. We match the multiple image positions at an r.m.s. level of $0.85\arcsec$ and can reconstruct the SFB distribution of the arc in several filters to a remarkable accuracy based on this cluster model. The length scale where the enclosed galaxy halo mass is best constrained is about 5 effective radii -- a scale in between those accessible to dynamical and field strong lensing mass estimates on one hand and galaxy--galaxy weak lensing results on the other hand. The velocity dispersion and halo size of a galaxy with $m_{\rm 160W,AB}=19.2$ or $M_{\rm B,Vega}=-20.7$ are $\sigma=150 \rm kms^{-1}$ and $r\approx 26\pm 6 \rm kpc$, indicating that the halos of the cluster galaxies are tidally stripped. We also reconstruct the unlensed source (which is smaller by a factor of $\sim5.8$ in area), demonstrating the increase of morphological information due to lensing and conclude that this galaxy has likely star--forming spiral arms with a red (older) central component.
  • Strong gravitational lensing by groups or clusters of galaxies provides a powerful technique to measure the dark matter properties of individual lens galaxies. We study in detail the mass distribution of the satellite lens galaxy in the group-scale lens SL2S J08544-0121 by modelling simultaneously the spatially extended surface brightness distribution of the source galaxy and the lens mass distribution using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. In particular, we measure the dark matter halo size of the satellite lens galaxy to be 6.0^{+2.9}_{-2.0} kpc with a fiducial velocity dispersion of 127^{+21}_{-12} km/s. This is the first time the size of an individual galaxy halo in a galaxy group has been measured using strong gravitational lensing without assumptions of mass following light. We verify the robustness of our halo size measurement using mock data resembling our lens system. Our measurement of the halo size is compatible with the estimated tidal radius of the satellite galaxy, suggesting that halos of galaxies in groups experience significant tidal stripping, a process that has been previously observed on galaxies in clusters. Our mass model of the satellite galaxy is elliptical with its major axis misaligned with that of the light by ~50 deg. The major axis of the total matter distribution is oriented more towards the centre of the host halo, exhibiting the radial alignment found in N-body simulations and observational studies of satellite galaxies. This misalignment between mass and light poses a significant challenge to modified Newtonian dynamics.
  • Precise modelling of strong lensing systems can be affected by external mass distributions, e.g. the group or cluster within which the lens is embedded. In this article, we propose to turn this limitation to our advantage and to use precise strong lensing modelling to probe external mass distributions surrounding the lens. We consider SL2S J08544-0121, a galaxy group at z=0.35 that contains a strong lensing system. A simple elliptical isothermal potential cannot reproduce satisfactorily the strong lensing constraints. We include an external mass perturbation corresponding to the group within which the lens is embedded. The lensing properties of this perturbation are parametrised by its total mass M and a smoothing scale s that quantifies the characteristic scale over which M is distributed. For a range of these parameters, we are able to reproduce accurately the observations. This suggests that light is a good tracer of mass. Interestingly, this also shows that a localised strong lensing analysis (on scales of ~10") allows us to constrain global properties of the group as a whole (on scales of ~100). Indeed, we constrain the group mass-to-light ratio to be M/L=98+-27 (i band, solar units, not corrected for evolution) and s=20" +- 9 (2sigma confidence level). We demonstrate that these strong lensing only constraints are due to the perturbed strong lensing configuration, where the main arc is located at ~5" from the galaxy, whereas its counter-image is found at ~8". To test independently our resulting strong lensing model, we pursue an independent weak lensing analysis of the group and find a mass-to-light ratio in the range 66-146 (1sigma confidence level).