• We present 2-9 GHz radio observations of GW170817 covering the period 125-200 days post-merger, taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Our observations demonstrate that the radio afterglow peaked at $149\pm2$ days post-merger and is now declining in flux density. We see no evidence for evolution in the radio-only spectral index, which remains consistent with optically-thin synchrotron emission connecting the radio, optical, and X-ray regimes. The peak implies a total energy in the synchrotron-emitting component of a ${\rm few}\times 10^{50}\,$erg. The temporal decay rate is most consistent with mildly- or non-relativistic material and we do not see evidence for a very energetic off-axis jet, but we cannot distinguish between a lower-energy jet and more isotropic emission.
  • Binary black holes (BBHs) are one of the endpoints of isolated binary evolution, and their mergers a leading channel for gravitational wave events. Here, using the evolutionary code \textsc{StarTrack}, we study the statistical properties of the BBH population from isolated binary evolution for a range of progenitor star metallicities and BH natal kicks. We compute the mass function and the distribution of the primary BH spin $a$ as a result of mass accretion during the binary evolution, and find that this is not an efficient process to spin up BHs, producing an increase by at most $a\sim$~0.2--0.3 for very low natal BH spins. We further compute the distribution of merger sites within the host galaxy, after tracking the motion of the binaries in the potentials of a massive spiral, a massive elliptical, and a dwarf galaxy. We find that a fraction of 70-90\% of mergers in massive galaxies and of 40-60\% in dwarfs (range mostly sensitive to the natal kicks) is expected to occur inside of their hosts. The number density distribution at the merger sites further allows us to estimate the broadband luminosity distribution that BBH mergers would produce, \textit{if} associated with a kinetic energy release in an outflow, {which, as a reference, we assume at the level inferred for the \textit{Fermi} GBM counterpart to GW150914, with the understanding that current limits from the O1 and O2 runs would require such emission to be produced within a jet of angular size within $\lesssim 50^\circ$.}
  • Motivated by the recent discovery of the binary neutron-star (BNS) merger GW170817, we determine the optimal observational setup for detecting and characterizing nearby (d_L~40 Mpc) radio counterparts of BNS mergers. We simulate GW170817-like radio transients, and radio afterglows generated by fast jets with isotropic energy E_iso~10^50 erg, expanding in a low-density interstellar medium (ISM; n_ISM=10^-4-10^-2 cm^-3), observed from different viewing angles (from slightly off-axis to largely off-axis). We then determine the optimal timing of GHz radio observations following the precise localization of the BNS, assuming a sensitivity comparable to that of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We show that radio is the optimal band to explore the fastest ejecta from BNSs in low-density ISM, since the optical emission is likely to be dominated by the so-called "kilonova" component, while X-rays from the jet are detectable only for a small subset of the BNS models considered here. Finally, we discuss how future radio arrays like the next generation VLA (ngVLA) would improve the detectability of BNS mergers with physical parameters similar to the ones here explored.
  • Type Ibn supernovae (SNe) are a small yet intriguing class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines with little to no evidence for hydrogen. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material (CSM). We report optical observations of six new SNe Ibn: PTF11rfh, PTF12ldy, iPTF14aki, iPTF15ul, SN 2015G, and iPTF15akq. This brings the sample size of such objects in the literature to 22. We also report new data, including a near-infrared spectrum, on the Type Ibn SN 2015U. In order to characterize the class as a whole, we analyze the photometric and spectroscopic properties of the full Type Ibn sample. We find that, despite the expectation that CSM interaction would generate a heterogeneous set of light curves, as seen in SNe IIn, most Type Ibn light curves are quite similar in shape, declining at rates around 0.1 mag/day during the first month after maximum light, with a few significant exceptions. Early spectra of SNe Ibn come in at least two varieties, one that shows narrow P Cygni lines and another dominated by broader emission lines, both around maximum light, which may be an indication of differences in the state of the progenitor system at the time of explosion. Alternatively, the spectral diversity could arise from viewing-angle effects or merely from a lack of early spectroscopic coverage. Together, the relative light curve homogeneity and narrow spectral features suggest that the CSM consists of a spatially confined shell of helium surrounded by a less dense extended wind.
  • Several models of gamma-ray burst progenitors suggest that the gamma-ray event may be followed by gravitational wave signals of $10^3$-$10^4$ seconds duration (possibly accompanying the so-called X-ray afterglow "plateaus"). We term these signals "intermediate-duration" because they are shorter than continuous wave signals but longer than signals traditionally considered as gravitational wave bursts, and are difficult to detect with most burst and continuous wave methods. The cross-correlation technique proposed by [S. Dhurandhar et al., Phys. Rev. D 77, 082001 (2008)], which so far has been used only on continuous wave signals, in principle unifies both burst and continuous wave (as well as matched filtering and stochastic background) methods, reducing them to different choices of which data to correlate on which time scales. Here we perform the first tuning of this cross-correlation technique to intermediate-duration signals. We derive theoretical estimates of sensitivity in Gaussian noise in different limits of the cross-correlation formalism, and compare them to the performance of a prototype search code on simulated Gaussian-noise data. We estimate that the code is likely able to detect \emph{some} classes of intermediate-duration signals (such as the ones described in [A. Corsi \& P. M\'esz\'aros, Astrophys. J., 702, 1171 (2009)]) from sources located at astrophysically-relevant distances of several tens of Mpc.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at $\approx 4$ hr after the $\gamma$-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and, at late times, showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at $>10 $ GHz, to attempt identifying reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward-shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broad-band data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter ($A_*$), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well sampled light curves) to unambiguously identify the potential contribution of the reverse shock.
  • The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has greatly expanded the number and energy window of observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, the coarse localizations of tens to a hundred square degrees provided by the Fermi GRB Monitor instrument have posed a formidable obstacle to locating the bursts' host galaxies, measuring their redshifts, and tracking their panchromatic afterglows. We have built a target-of-opportunity mode for the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory in order to perform targeted searches for Fermi afterglows. Here, we present the results of one year of this program: 8 afterglow discoveries out of 35 searches. Two of the bursts with detected afterglows (GRBs 130702A and 140606B) were at low redshift (z=0.145 and 0.384 respectively) and had spectroscopically confirmed broad-line Type Ic supernovae. We present our broadband follow-up including spectroscopy as well as X-ray, UV, optical, millimeter, and radio observations. We study possible selection effects in the context of the total Fermi and Swift GRB samples. We identify one new outlier on the Amati relation. We find that two bursts are consistent with a mildly relativistic shock breaking out from the progenitor star, rather than the ultra-relativistic internal shock mechanism that powers standard cosmological bursts. Finally, in the context of the Zwicky Transient Facility, we discuss how we will continue to expand this effort to find optical counterparts of binary neutron star mergers that may soon be detected by Advanced LIGO and Virgo.
  • We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous ($M_{r}\approx-27.8$ mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of $\Re_{\mathrm{rel}}=610$ yr$^{-1}$ (68% confidence interval of 110-2000 yr$^{-1}$). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide "orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking detectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.
  • We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 square degrees surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the VLA confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200-inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z=0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt gamma-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological GRBs and nearby sub-luminous events such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218. The bright afterglow and emerging supernova offer an opportunity for extensive panchromatic follow-up. Our discovery of iPTF13bxl demonstrates the first observational proof-of-principle for ~10 Fermi-iPTF localizations annually. Furthermore, it represents an important step towards overcoming the challenges inherent in uncovering faint optical counterparts to comparably localized gravitational wave events in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo era.
  • Only a few cases of type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta have been discovered and studied. Here we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of a Type Ic SN, PTF12gzk. The radio emission rapidly declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (~0.3c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ~10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the VLA (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), that are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions, as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.
  • We report the discovery by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) of the transient source PTF11agg, which is distinguished by three primary characteristics: (1) bright, rapidly fading optical transient emission; (2) a faint, blue quiescent optical counterpart; and (3) an associated year-long, scintillating radio transient. We argue that these observed properties are inconsistent with any known class of Galactic transients, and instead suggest a cosmological origin. The detection of incoherent radio emission at such distances implies a large emitting region, from which we infer the presence of relativistic ejecta. The observed properties are all consistent with the population of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), marking the first time such an outburst has been discovered in the distant universe independent of a high-energy trigger. We searched for possible high-energy counterparts to PTF11agg, but found no evidence for associated prompt emission. We therefore consider three possible scenarios to account for a GRB-like afterglow without a high-energy counterpart: an "untriggered" GRB (lack of satellite coverage), an "orphan" afterglow (viewing-angle effects), and a "dirty fireball" (suppressed high-energy emission). The observed optical and radio light curves appear inconsistent with even the most basic predictions for off-axis afterglow models. The simplest explanation, then, is that PTF11agg is a normal, on-axis long-duration GRB for which the associated high-energy emission was simply missed. However, we have calculated the likelihood of such a serendipitous discovery by PTF and find that it is quite small (~ 2.6%). While not definitive, we nonetheless speculate that PTF11agg may represent a new, more common (> 4 times the on-axis GRB rate at 90% confidence) class of relativistic outbursts lacking associated high-energy emission.
  • We present the baseline multimessenger analysis method for the joint observations of gravitational waves (GW) and high-energy neutrinos (HEN), together with a detailed analysis of the expected science reach of the joint search. The analysis method combines data from GW and HEN detectors, and uses the blue-luminosity-weighted distribution of galaxies. We derive expected GW+HEN source rate upper limits for a wide range of source parameters covering several emission models. Using published sensitivities of externally triggered searches, we derive joint upper limit estimates both for the ongoing analysis with the initial LIGO-Virgo GW detectors with the partial IceCube detector (22 strings) HEN detector and for projected results to advanced LIGO-Virgo detectors with the completed IceCube (86 strings). We discuss the constraints these upper limits impose on some existing GW+HEN emission models.
  • It remains an open question to what extent many of the astronomical sources of intense bursts of electromagnetic radiation are also strong emitters of non-photon messengers, in particular gravitational waves (GWs) and high-energy neutrinos (HENs). Such emission would provide unique insights into the physics of the bursts; moreover some suspected classes, e.g. choked gamma-ray bursts, may in fact only be identifiable via these alternative channels. Here we explore the reach of current and planned experiments to address this question. We derive constraints on the rate of GW and HEN bursts per Milky Way equivalent (MWE) galaxy based on independent observations by the initial LIGO and Virgo GW detectors and the partially completed IceCube (40-string) HEN detector. We take into account the blue-luminosity-weighted distribution of nearby galaxies, assuming that source distribution follows the blue-luminosity distribution. We then estimate the reach of joint GW+HEN searches using advanced GW detectors and the completed cubic-km IceCube detector to probe the joint parameter space. We show that searches undertaken by advanced detectors will be capable of detecting, constraining or excluding, several existing models with one year of observation.
  • We assess the possibility to detect the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) in emission and to characterize its physical conditions and spatial distribution through spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy, in the framework of the recently proposed DIOS, EDGE, Xenia, and ORIGIN missions, all of which are equipped with microcalorimeter-based detectors. For this purpose we analyze a large set of mock emission spectra, extracted from a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. These mock X-ray spectra are searched for emission features showing both the OVII K alpha triplet and OVIII Ly alpha line, which constitute a typical signature of the warm hot gas. Our analysis shows that 1 Ms long exposures and energy resolution of 2.5 eV will allow us to detect about 400 such features per deg^2 with a significance >5 sigma and reveals that these emission systems are typically associated with density ~100 above the mean. The temperature can be estimated from the line ratio with a precision of ~20%. The combined effect of contamination from other lines, variation in the level of the continuum, and degradation of the energy resolution reduces these estimates. Yet, with an energy resolution of 7 eV and all these effects taken into account, one still expects about 160 detections per deg^2. These line systems are sufficient to trace the spatial distribution of the line-emitting gas, which constitute an additional information, independent from line statistics, to constrain the poorly known cosmic chemical enrichment history and the stellar feedback processes.
  • Recent searches of gravitational-wave (GW) data raise the question of what maximum GW energies could be emitted during gamma-ray flares of highly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars). The highest energies (\sim 10^{49} erg) predicted so far come from a model [K. Ioka, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 327, 639 (2001)] in which the internal magnetic field of a magnetar experiences a global reconfiguration, changing the hydromagnetic equilibrium structure of the star and tapping the gravitational potential energy without changing the magnetic potential energy. The largest energies in this model assume very special conditions, including a large change in moment of inertia (which was observed in at most one flare), a very high internal magnetic field, and a very soft equation of state. Here we show that energies of 10^{48}-10^{49} erg are possible under more generic conditions by tapping the magnetic energy, and we note that similar energies may also be available through cracking of exotic solid cores. Current observational limits on gravitational waves from magnetar fundamental modes are just reaching these energies and will beat them in the era of advanced interferometers.
  • We derive a conservative coincidence time window for joint searches of gravita-tional-wave (GW) transients and high-energy neutrinos (HENs, with energies above 100GeV), emitted by gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The last are among the most interesting astrophysical sources for coincident detections with current and near-future detectors. We take into account a broad range of emission mechanisms. We take the upper limit of GRB durations as the 95% quantile of the T90's of GRBs observed by BATSE, obtaining a GRB duration upper limit of ~150s. Using published results on high-energy (>100MeV) photon light curves for 8 GRBs detected by Fermi LAT, we verify that most high-energy photons are expected to be observed within the first ~150s of the GRB. Taking into account the breakout-time of the relativistic jet produced by the central engine, we allow GW and HEN emission to begin up to 100s before the onset of observable gamma photon production. Using published precursor time differences, we calculate a time upper bound for precursor activity, obtaining that 95% of precursors occur within ~250s prior to the onset of the GRB. Taking the above different processes into account, we arrive at a time window of tHEN - tGW ~ [-500s,+500s]. Considering the above processes, an upper bound can also be determined for the expected time window of GW and/or HEN signals coincident with a detected GRB, tGW - tGRB ~ tHEN - tGRB ~ [-350s,+150s].
  • We investigate whether the high energy tail detected by the Fermi/LAT for the short GRB 081024B can be caused by synchrotron and self-Compton emission in the context of either the internal or external shock models. For the internal shock scenario, we explore the possibility of generating the high energy photons directly by means of the synchrotron process, or inverse Compton emission in which target photons are synchrotron photons produced in internal shocks taking place in a lately emitted shell (delayed internal shocks). In the external shock scenario, we test whether the high energy tail can be an extension of the afterglow synchrotron emission, or alternatively the inverse Compton component associated with the afterglow synchrotron photons. For the internal shock scenario, we conclude that only an inverse Compton component from delayed internal shocks can explain the high energy tail that extends to the GeV range. In the external shock scenario, we show that the high energy tail may be interpreted as synchrotron afterglow emission, if the slow cooling phase starts as early as a few seconds after the trigger. On the other hand, the observed high energy tail is consistent with an inverse Compton component of the afterglow in the fast cooling regime.
  • We investigate the origin of the prompt and delayed emission observed in the short GRB 090510. We use the broad-band data to test whether the most popular theoretical models for gamma-ray burst emission can accommodate the observations for this burst. We first attempt to explain the soft-to-hard spectral evolution associated with the delayed onset of a GeV tail with the hypothesis that the prompt burst and the high energy tail both originate from a single process, namely synchrotron emission from internal shocks. Considerations on the compactness of the source imply that the high-energy tail should be produced in a late-emitted shell, characterized by a Lorentz factor greater than the one generating the prompt burst. However, in this hypothesis, the predicted evolution of the synchrotron peak frequency does not agree with the observed soft-to-hard evolution. Given the difficulties of a single-mechanism hypothesis, we test two alternative double-component scenarios. In the first, the prompt burst is explained as synchrotron radiation from internal shocks, and the high energy emission (up to about 1 s following the trigger) as internal shock synchrotron-self-Compton. In the second scenario, in view of its long duration (\sim 100 s), the high energy tail is decoupled from the prompt burst and has an external shock origin. In this case, we show that a reasonable choice of parameters does indeed exist to accommodate the optical-to-GeV data, provided the Lorentz factor of the shocked shell is sufficiently high. Finally, we attempt to explain the chromatic break observed around \sim 1e3 s with a structured jet model. We find that this might be a viable explanation, and that it lowers the high value of the burst energy derived assuming isotropy, \sim 1e53 erg, below \sim 1e49 erg, more compatible with the energetics from a binary merger progenitor.
  • The existence of a shallow decay phase in the early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts is a common feature. Here we investigate the possibility that this is connected to the formation of a highly magnetized millisecond pulsar, pumping energy into the fireball on timescales longer than the prompt emission. In this scenario the nascent neutron star could undergo a secular bar-mode instability, leading to gravitational wave losses which would affect the neutron star spin-down. In this case, nearby gamma-ray bursts with isotropic energies of the order of 1e50 ergs would produce a detectable gravitational wave signal emitted in association with an observed X-ray light-curve plateau, over relatively long timescales of minutes to about an hour. The peak amplitude of the gravitational wave signal would be delayed with respect to the gamma-ray burst trigger, offering gravitational wave interferometers such as the advanced LIGO and Virgo the challenging possibility of catching its signature on the fly.
  • It is widely expected that the coming decade will witness the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs). The ground-based LIGO and Virgo GW observatories are being upgraded to advanced sensitivity, and are expected to observe a significant binary merger rate. The launch of The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) would extend the GW window to low frequencies, opening new vistas on dynamical processes involving massive (M >~ 10^5 M_Sun) black holes. GW events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic (EM) counterparts and, since information carried electromagnetically is complementary to that carried gravitationally, a great deal can be learned about an event and its environment if it becomes possible to measure both forms of radiation in concert. Measurements of this kind will mark the dawn of trans-spectral astrophysics, bridging two distinct spectral bands of information. The aim of this whitepaper is to articulate future directions in both theory and observation that are likely to impact broad astrophysical inquiries of general interest. What will EM observations reflect on the nature and diversity of GW sources? Can GW sources be exploited as complementary probes of cosmology? What cross-facility coordination will expand the science returns of gravitational and electromagnetic observations?
  • GRB970228 is analyzed as a prototype to understand the relative role of short GRBs and their associated afterglows, recently observed by Swift and HETE-II. Detailed theoretical computation of the GRB970228 light curves in selected energy bands are presented and compared with observational BeppoSAX data.