• We show that in decaying hydromagnetic turbulence with initial kinetic helicity, a weak magnetic field eventually becomes fully helical. The sign of magnetic helicity is opposite to that of the kinetic helicity - regardless of whether or not the initial magnetic field was helical. The magnetic field undergoes inverse cascading with the magnetic energy decaying approximately like t^{-1/2}. This is even slower than in the fully helical case, where it decays like t^{-2/3}. In this parameter range, the product of magnetic energy and correlation length raised to a certain power slightly larger than unity, is approximately constant. This scaling of magnetic energy persists over long time scales. At very late times and for domain sizes large enough to accommodate the growing spatial scales, we expect a cross-over to the t^{-2/3} decay law that is commonly observed for fully helical magnetic fields. Regardless of the presence or absence of initial kinetic helicity, the magnetic field experiences exponential growth during the first few turnover times, which is suggestive of small-scale dynamo action. Our results have applications to a wide range of experimental dynamos and astrophysical time-dependent plasmas, including primordial turbulence in the early universe.
  • We consider a scale-invariant helical magnetic field generated during inflation. We show that, if the mean magnetic helicity density of such a field is measured, it can be used to determine a lower bound on the duration of inflation. Upper bounds can be used to derive constraints on the minimal duration of inflation if one assumes that the magnetic field generated during inflation is helical. Using three-dimensional simulations, we show that an initially scale-invariant field develops, which is similar both with and without magnetic helicity. In the fully helical case, however, the magnetic field appears to have a more pronounced folded structure.
  • We present new simulations of decaying hydromagnetic turbulence for a relativistic equation of state relevant to the early universe. We compare helical and nonhelical cases either with kinetically or magnetically dominated initial fields. Both kinetic and magnetic initial helicities lead to maximally helical magnetic fields after some time, but with different temporal decay laws. Both are relevant to the early universe, although no mechanisms have yet been identified that produce magnetic helicity with strengths comparable to the big bang nucleosynthesis limit at scales comparable to the Hubble horizon at the electroweak phase transition. Nonhelical magnetically dominated fields could still produce picoGauss magnetic fields under most optimistic conditions. Only helical magnetic fields can potentially have nanoGauss strengths at scales up to 30 kpc today.
  • The linear stability of viscous Keplerian flow around a gravitating center is studied using the rheological granular fluid model. The linear rheological instability triggered by the interplay of the shear rheology and Keplerian differential rotation of incompressible dense granular fluids is found. Instability sets in granular fluids, where the viscosity parameter grows faster than the square of the local shear rate (strain rate) at constant pressure. Found instability can play a crucial role in the dynamics of dense planetary rings and granular flows in protoplanetary disks.
  • We study the evolution of primordial magnetic fields in an expanding cosmic plasma. For this purpose we present a comprehensive theoretical model to consider the evolution of MHD turbulence that can be used over a wide range of physical conditions, including cosmological and astrophysical applications. We model different types of decaying cosmic MHD turbulence in the expanding universe and characterize the large-scale magnetic fields in such a medium. Direct numerical simulations of freely decaying MHD turbulence are performed for different magnetogenesis scenarios: magnetic fields generated during cosmic inflation as well as electroweak and QCD phase transitions in the early universe. Magnetic fields and fluid motions are strongly coupled due to the high Reynolds number in the early universe. Hence, we abandon the simple adiabatic dilution model to estimate magnetic field amplitudes in the expanding universe and include turbulent mixing effects on the large-scale magnetic field evolution. Numerical simulations have been carried out for non-helical and helical magnetic field configurations. The numerical results show the possibility of inverse transfer of energy in magnetically dominated non-helical MHD turbulence. On the other hand, decay properties of helical turbulence depend on whether the turbulent magnetic field is in a weakly or a fully helical state. Our results show that primordial magnetic fields can be considered as a seed for the observed large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies and clusters. Bounds on the magnetic field strength are obtained and are consistent with the upper and lower limits set by observations of extragalactic magnetic fields.
  • In the presence of magnetic helicity, inverse transfer from small to large scales is well known in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and has applications in astrophysics, cosmology, and fusion plasmas. Using high resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetically dominated self-similarly decaying MHD turbulence, we report a similar inverse transfer even in the absence of magnetic helicity. We compute for the first time spectral energy transfer rates to show that this inverse transfer is about half as strong as with helicity, but in both cases the magnetic gain at large scales results from velocity at similar scales interacting with smaller-scale magnetic fields. This suggests that both inverse transfers are a consequence of a universal mechanisms for magnetically dominated turbulence. Possible explanations include inverse cascading of the mean squared vector potential associated with local near two-dimensionality and the shallower $k^2$ subinertial range spectrum of kinetic energy forcing the magnetic field with a $k^4$ subinertial range to attain larger-scale coherence. The inertial range shows a clear $k^{-2}$ spectrum and is the first example of fully isotropic magnetically dominated MHD turbulence exhibiting weak turbulence scaling.
  • We study primordial magnetic field effects on the matter perturbations in the Universe. We assume magnetic field generation prior to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), i.e. during the radiation dominated epoch of the Universe expansion, but do not limit analysis by considering a particular magnetogenesis scenario. Contrary to previous studies, we limit the total magnetic field energy density and not the smoothed amplitude of the magnetic field at large (order of 1 Mpc) scales. We review several cosmological signatures, such as halos abundance, thermal Sunyaev Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect, and Lyman-$\alpha$ data. For a cross check we compare our limits with that obtained through the CMB faraday rotation effect and BBN. The limits are ranging between 1.5 nG and 4.5 nG for $n_B \in (-3; -1.5)$.
  • We consider the evolution of primordial magnetic fields generated during cosmological, electroweak or QCD, phase transitions. We assume that the magnetic field generation can be described as an injection of magnetic energy to cosmological plasma at a given scale determined by the moment of magnetic field generation. A high Reynolds number ensures strong coupling between magnetic field and fluid motions. The subsequent evolution of the magnetic field is governed by decaying hydromagnetic turbulence. Both our numerical simulations and a phenomenological description allow us to recover "universal" laws for the decay of magnetic energy and the growth of magnetic correlation length in the turbulent (low viscosity) regime. In particular, we show that during the radiation dominated epoch, energy and correlation length of non-helical magnetic fields scale as conformal time to the powers -1/2 and +1/2, respectively. For helical magnetic fields, energy and correlation length scale as conformal time to the powers -1/3 and +2/3, respectively. The universal decay law of the magnetic field implies that the strength of magnetic field generated during the QCD phase transition could reach $\sim 10^{-9}$\,G with the present day correlation length $\sim 50$ kpc. The fields generated at the electroweak phase transition could be as strong as $\sim 10^{-10}$ G with correlation lengths reaching $\sim 0.3$\,kpc. These values of the magnetic fields are consistent with the lower bounds of the extragalactic magnetic fields.
  • We study the evolution of an inflation-generated magnetic field, due to its coupling to fluid motions, during cosmological phase transitions. We find that the magnetic field stays almost unchanged on large scales, while on small scales the spectrum is modified in such a way that power at small scales becomes progressively suppressed. We also show that the magnetic field generates turbulent motions in the initially turbulence-free plasma. On large scales, the slope of the resulting kinetic energy spectrum is consistent with that of white noise.
  • We study the evolution of QCD phase transition-generated magnetic fields in freely decaying MHD turbulence of the expanding Universe. We consider a magnetic field generation model that starts from basic non-perturbative QCD theory and predicts stochastic magnetic fields with an amplitude of the order of 0.02 $\mu$G and small magnetic helicity. We employ direct numerical simulations to model the MHD turbulence decay and identify two different regimes: "weakly helical" turbulence regime, when magnetic helicity increases during decay, and "fully helical" turbulence, when maximal magnetic helicity is reached and an inverse cascade develops. The results of our analysis show that in the most optimistic scenario the magnetic correlation length in the comoving frame can reach 10 kpc with the amplitude of the effective magnetic field being 0.007 nG. We demonstrate that the considered model of magneto-genesis can provide the seed magnetic field for galaxies and clusters.
  • We constrain a primordial magnetic field (PMF) generated during a phase transition (PT) using the big bang nucleosynthesis bound on the relativistic energy density. The amplitude of the PMF at large scales is determined by the shape of the PMF spectrum outside its maximal correlation length scale. Even if the amplitude of the PMF at 1 Mpc is small, PT-generated PMFs can leave observable signatures in the potentially detectable relic gravitational wave background if a large enough fraction ($1-10%$) of the thermal energy is converted into the PMF.
  • We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically-relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.
  • We perform direct numerical simulations of forced and freely decaying 3D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in order to model magnetic field evolution during cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe. Our approach assumes the existence of a magnetic field generated either by a process during inflation or shortly thereafter, or by bubble collisions during a phase transition. We show that the final configuration of the magnetic field depends on the initial conditions, while the velocity field is nearly independent of initial conditions.