• We theoretically and experimentally investigate low-Reynolds-number propulsion of geometrically achiral planar objects that possess a dipole moment and that are driven by a rotating magnetic field. Symmetry considerations (involving parity, $\widehat{P}$, and charge conjugation, $\widehat{C}$) establish correspondence between propulsive states depending on orientation of the dipolar moment. Although basic symmetry arguments do not forbid individual symmetric objects to efficiently propel due to spontaneous symmetry breaking, they suggest that the average ensemble velocity vanishes. Some additional arguments show, however, that highly symmetrical ($\widehat{P}$-even) objects exhibit no net propulsion while individual less symmetrical ($\widehat{C}\widehat{P}$-even) propellers do propel. Particular magnetization orientation, rendering the shape $\widehat{C}\widehat{P}$-odd, yields unidirectional motion typically associated with chiral structures, such as helices. If instead of a structure with a permanent dipole we consider a polarizable object, some of the arguments have to be modified. For instance, we demonstrate a truly achiral ($\widehat{P}$- and $\widehat{C}\widehat{P}$-even) planar shape with an induced electric dipole that can propel by electro-rotation. We thereby show that chirality is not essential for propulsion due to rotation-translation coupling at low Reynolds number.
  • Externally powered magnetic nanomotors are of particular interest due to the potential use for \emph{in vivo} biomedical applications. Here we develop a theory for dynamics and polarization of recently fabricated superparamagnetic chiral nanomotors powered by a rotating magnetic field. We study in detail various experimentally observed regimes of the nanomotor dynamic orientation and propulsion and establish the dependence of these properties on polarization and geometry of the propellers. Based on the proposed theory we introduce a novel "steerability" parameter $\gamma$ that can be used to rank polarizable nanomotors by their propulsive capability. The theoretical predictions of the nanomotor orientation and propulsion speed are in excellent agreement with available experimental results. Lastly, we apply slender-body approximation to estimate polarization anisotropy and orientation of the easy-axis of superparamagnetic helical propellers.
  • Propulsion of the chiral magnetic nanomotors powered by a rotating magnetic field is in the focus of the modern biomedical applications. This technology relies on strong interaction of dynamic and magnetic degrees of freedom of the system. Here we study in detail various experimentally observed regimes of the helical nanomotor orientation and propulsion depending on the actuation frequency, and establish the relation of these two properties with remanent magnetization and geometry of the helical nanomotors. The theoretical predictions for the transition between the regimes and nanomotor orientation and propulsion speed are in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The proposed theory offers a few simple guidelines towards the optimal design of the magnetic nanomotors. In particular, efficient nanomotors should be fabricated of hard magnetics, e.g., cobalt, magnetized transversally and have the geometry of a normal helix with a helical angle of 35-45 degrees.
  • We study the properties of arbitrary micro-swimmers towing a passive load through a viscous liquid. The simple close-form expression for the dragging efficiency of a general micro-swimmer dragging a distant load is found, and the leading order approximation for finite mutual separation is derived. We show that, while swimmer can be arbitrarily efficient, dragging efficiency is always bounded from above. It is also demonstrated, that opposite to Purcell's assumption, the hydrodynamic coupling can ''help" the swimmer to drag the load. We support our conclusions by rigorous numerical calculations for the "necklace-shaped" swimmer, towing a spherical cargo positioned at a finite distance.
  • We investigate the self-locomotion of an elongated microswimmer by virtue of the unidirectional tangential surface treadmilling. We show that the propulsion could be almost frictionless, as the microswimmer is propelled forward with the speed of the backward surface motion, i.e. it moves throughout an almost quiescent fluid. We investigate this swimming technique using the special spheroidal coordinates and also find an explicit closed-form optimal solution for a two-dimensional treadmiler via complex-variable techniques.