• We search the Planck data for a thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) signal due to gas filaments between pairs of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG's) taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS/DR12). We identify $\sim$260,000 LRG pairs in the DR12 catalog that lie within 6-10 $h^{-1} \mathrm{Mpc}$ of each other in tangential direction and within 6 $h^{-1} \mathrm{Mpc}$ in radial direction. We stack pairs by rotating and scaling the angular positions of each LRG so they lie on a common reference frame, then we subtract a circularly symmetric halo from each member of the pair to search for a residual signal between the pair members. We find a statistically significant (5.3$\sigma$) signal between LRG pairs in the stacked data with a magnitude $\Delta y = (1.31 \pm 0.25) \times 10^{-8}$. The uncertainty is estimated from two Monte Carlo null tests which also establish the reliability of our analysis. Assuming a simple, isothermal, cylindrical filament model of electron over-density with a radial density profile proportional to $r_c/r$ (as determined from simulations), where $r$ is the perpendicular distance from the cylinder axis and $r_c$ is the core radius of the density profile, we constrain the product of over-density and filament temperature to be $\delta_c \times (T_{\rm e}/10^7 \, {\rm K}) \times (r_c/0.5h^{-1} \, {\rm Mpc}) = 2.7 \pm 0.5$. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of filamentary gas at over-densities typical of cosmological large-scale structure. We compare our result to the BAHAMAS suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations (McCarthy et al. 2017) and find a slightly lower, but marginally consistent Comptonization excess, $\Delta y = (0.84 \pm 0.24) \times 10^{-8}$.
  • We present measurements of the spatial mapping between (hot) baryons and the total matter in the Universe, via the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) map from Planck and the weak gravitational lensing maps from the Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCSLenS). The cross-correlations are performed on the map level where all the sources (including diffuse intergalactic gas) contribute to the signal. We consider two configuration-space correlation function estimators, $\xi^{ y-\kappa}$ and $\xi^ {y-\gamma_{t}}$, and a Fourier space estimator, $C_{\ell}^{y-\kappa}$, in our analysis. We detect a significant correlation out to three degrees of angular separation on the sky. Based on statistical noise only, we can report 13$\sigma$ and 17$\sigma$ detections of the cross-correlation using the configuration-space $y-\kappa$ and $y-\gamma_{t}$ estimators, respectively. Including a heuristic estimate of the sampling variance yields a detection significance of 6$\sigma$ and 8$\sigma$, respectively. A similar level of detection is obtained from the Fourier-space estimator, $C_{\ell}^{y-\kappa}$. As each estimator probes different dynamical ranges, their combination improves the significance of the detection. We compare our measurements with predictions from the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, where different galactic feedback models are implemented. We find that a model with considerable AGN feedback that removes large quantities of hot gas from galaxy groups and WMAP-7yr best-fit cosmological parameters provides the best match to the measurements. All baryonic models in the context of a Planck cosmology over-predict the observed signal. Similar cosmological conclusions are drawn when we employ a halo model with the observed `universal' pressure profile.
  • We measure the cross-correlation signature between the Planck CMB lensing map and the weak lensing observations from both the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS) and the Canada-France-Hawai Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). In addition to a Fourier analysis, we include the first configuration-space detection, based on the estimators $\langle \kappa_{\rm CMB} \kappa_{\rm gal} \rangle$ and $\langle \kappa_{\rm CMB} \gamma_{t} \rangle$. Combining 747.2 deg$^2$ from both surveys, we find a detection significance that exceeds $4.2\sigma$ in both Fourier- and configuration-space analyses. Scaling the predictions by a free parameter $A$, we obtain $A^{\rm Planck}_{\rm CFHT}= 0.68\pm 0.31 $ and $A^{\rm Planck}_{\rm RCS}= 1.31\pm 0.33$. In preparation for the next generation of measurements similar to these, we quantify the impact of different analysis choices on these results. First, since none of these estimators probes the exact same dynamical range, we improve our detection by combining them. Second, we carry out a detailed investigation on the effect of apodization, zero-padding and mask multiplication, validated on a suite of high-resolution simulations, and find that the latter produces the largest systematic bias in the cosmological interpretation. Finally, we show that residual contamination from intrinsic alignment and the effect of photometric redshift error are both largely degenerate with the characteristic signal from massive neutrinos, however the signature of baryon feedback might be easier to distinguish. The three lensing datasets are now publicly available.
  • We use the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which includes different galactic feedback models, to predict the cross-correlation signal between weak gravitational lensing and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) $y$-parameter. The predictions are compared to the recent detection reported by van Waerbeke and collaborators. The simulations reproduce the weak lensing-tSZ cross-correlation, $\xi_{y\kappa}(\theta)$, well. The uncertainty arising from different possible feedback models appears to be important on small scales only ($\theta \lesssim 10$ arcmin), while the amplitude of the correlation on all scales is sensitive to cosmological parameters that control the growth rate of structure (such as $\sigma_8$, $\Omega_m$ and $\Omega_b$). This study confirms our previous claim (in Ma et al.) that a significant proportion of the signal originates from the diffuse gas component in low-mass ($M_{\rm{halo}} \lesssim 10^{14} M_{\odot}$) clusters as well as from the region beyond the virial radius. We estimate that approximately 20$\%$ of the detected signal comes from low-mass clusters, which corresponds to about 30$\%$ of the baryon density of the Universe. The simulations also suggest that more than half of the baryons in the Universe are in the form of diffuse gas outside halos ($\gtrsim 5$ times the virial radius) which is not hot or dense enough to produce a significant tSZ signal or be observed by X-ray experiments. Finally, we show that future high-resolution tSZ-lensing cross-correlation observations will serve as a powerful tool for discriminating between different galactic feedback models.
  • We present a science forecast for the eBOSS survey, part of the SDSS-IV project, which is a spectroscopic survey using multiple tracers of large-scale structure, including luminous red galaxies (LRGs), emission line galaxies (ELGs) and quasars (both as a direct probe of structure and through the Ly-$\alpha$ forest). Focusing on discrete tracers, we forecast the expected accuracy of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO), the redshift-space distortion (RSD) measurements, the $f_{\rm NL}$ parameter quantifying the primordial non-Gaussianity, the dark energy and modified gravity parameters. We also use the line-of-sight clustering in the Ly-$\alpha$ forest to constrain the total neutrino mass. We find that eBOSS LRGs ($0.6<z<1.0$) (combined with the BOSS LRGs at $z>0.6$), ELGs ($0.6<z<1.2$) and Clustering Quasars (CQs) ($0.6<z<2.2$) can achieve a precision of 1%, 2.2% and 1.6% precisions, respectively, for spherically averaged BAO distance measurements. Using the same samples, the constraint on $f\sigma_8$ is expected to be 2.5%, 3.3% and 2.8% respectively. For primordial non-Gaussianity, eBOSS alone can reach an accuracy of $\sigma(f_{\rm NL})\sim10-15$, depending on the external measurement of the galaxy bias and our ability to model large-scale systematic errors. eBOSS can at most improve the dark energy Figure of Merit (FoM) by a factor of $3$ for the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) parametrisation, and can well constrain three eigenmodes for the general equation-of-state parameter (Abridged).
  • Cosmic microwave background lensing has become a new cosmological probe, carrying rich information on the matter power spectrum and distances over the redshift range $z\approx1$-4. We investigate the role of scale dependent new physics, such as from modified gravity, neutrino mass, and cold (low sound speed) dark energy, and its signature on CMB lensing. The distinction between different scale dependences, and the different redshift dependent weighting of the matter power spectrum entering into CMB lensing and other power spectra, imply that CMB lensing can probe simultaneously a diverse range of physics. We highlight the role of arcminute resolution polarization experiments for distinguishing between physical effects.
  • Modified gravity theories often contain a scalar field of gravitational strength which interacts with matter. We examine constraints on the range and the coupling strength of a scalar gravitational degree of freedom using a subset of current data that can be safely analyzed within the linear perturbation theory. Using a model-independent implementation of scalar-tensor theories in MGCAMB in terms of two functions of the scale factor describing the mass and the coupling of the scalar degree of freedom, we derive constraints on the $f(R)$, generalized chameleon, Symmetron and Dilaton models. Since most of the large scale structure data available today is from relatively low redshifts, only a limited range of observed scales is in the linear regime, leading to relatively weak constraints. We then perform a forecast for a future large scale structure survey, such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will map a significant volume at higher redshifts, and show that it will produce much stronger constraints on scalar interactions in specific models. We also perform a principal component analysis and find that future surveys should be able to provide tight constraints on several eigenmodes of the scalar mass evolution.
  • Approximately half of the Universe's baryons are in a form that has been hard to detect directly. However, the missing component can be traced through the cross-correlation of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect with weak gravitational lensing. We build a model for this correlation and use it to constrain the extended baryon component, employing data from the Canada France Hawaii Lensing Survey and the {\it Planck\/} satellite. The measured correlation function is consistent with an isothermal $\beta$-model for the halo gas pressure profile, and the 1- and 2-halo terms are both detected at the 4$\sigma$ level. In addition, we measure the hydrostatic mass bias $(1-b)=0.79^{+0.07}_{-0.10}$, which is consistent with numerical simulation results and the constraints from X-ray observations. The effective temperature of the gas is found to be in the range ($7\times10^{5}$--$3 \times10^{8}$)\,K, with approximately $50\%$ of the baryons appearing to lie beyond the virial radius of the halos, consistent with current expectations for the warm-hot intergalactic medium.
  • The time delays between point-like images in gravitational lens systems can be used to measure cosmological parameters. The number of lenses with measured time delays is growing rapidly; the upcoming \emph{Large Synoptic Survey Telescope} (LSST) will monitor $\sim10^3$ strongly lensed quasars. In an effort to assess the present capabilities of the community to accurately measure the time delays, and to provide input to dedicated monitoring campaigns and future LSST cosmology feasibility studies, we have invited the community to take part in a "Time Delay Challenge" (TDC). The challenge is organized as a set of "ladders," each containing a group of simulated datasets to be analyzed blindly by participating teams. Each rung on a ladder consists of a set of realistic mock observed lensed quasar light curves, with the rungs' datasets increasing in complexity and realism. The initial challenge described here has two ladders, TDC0 and TDC1. TDC0 has a small number of datasets, and is designed to be used as a practice set by the participating teams. The (non-mandatory) deadline for completion of TDC0 was the TDC1 launch date, December 1, 2013. The TDC1 deadline was July 1 2014. Here we give an overview of the challenge, we introduce a set of metrics that will be used to quantify the goodness-of-fit, efficiency, precision, and accuracy of the algorithms, and we present the results of TDC0. Thirteen teams participated in TDC0 using 47 different methods. Seven of those teams qualified for TDC1, which is described in the companion paper II.
  • We present the results of the first strong lens time delay challenge. The motivation, experimental design, and entry level challenge are described in a companion paper. This paper presents the main challenge, TDC1, which consisted of analyzing thousands of simulated light curves blindly. The observational properties of the light curves cover the range in quality obtained for current targeted efforts (e.g.,~COSMOGRAIL) and expected from future synoptic surveys (e.g.,~LSST), and include simulated systematic errors. \nteamsA\ teams participated in TDC1, submitting results from \nmethods\ different method variants. After a describing each method, we compute and analyze basic statistics measuring accuracy (or bias) $A$, goodness of fit $\chi^2$, precision $P$, and success rate $f$. For some methods we identify outliers as an important issue. Other methods show that outliers can be controlled via visual inspection or conservative quality control. Several methods are competitive, i.e., give $|A|<0.03$, $P<0.03$, and $\chi^2<1.5$, with some of the methods already reaching sub-percent accuracy. The fraction of light curves yielding a time delay measurement is typically in the range $f = $20--40\%. It depends strongly on the quality of the data: COSMOGRAIL-quality cadence and light curve lengths yield significantly higher $f$ than does sparser sampling. Taking the results of TDC1 at face value, we estimate that LSST should provide around 400 robust time-delay measurements, each with $P<0.03$ and $|A|<0.01$, comparable to current lens modeling uncertainties. In terms of observing strategies, we find that $A$ and $f$ depend mostly on season length, while P depends mostly on cadence and campaign duration.
  • Strong gravitational lensing forms multiple, time delayed images of cosmological sources, with the "focal length" of the lens serving as a cosmological distance probe. Robust estimation of the time delay distance can tightly constrain the Hubble constant as well as the matter density and dark energy. Current and next generation surveys will find hundreds to thousands of lensed systems but accurate time delay estimation from noisy, gappy lightcurves is potentially a limiting systematic. Using a large sample of blinded lightcurves from the Strong Lens Time Delay Challenge we develop and demonstrate a Gaussian Process crosscorrelation technique that delivers an average bias within 0.1% depending on the sampling, necessary for subpercent Hubble constant determination. The fits are accurate (80% of them within 1 day) for delays from 5-100 days and robust against cadence variations shorter than 6 days. We study the effects of survey characteristics such as cadence, season, and campaign length, and derive requirements for time delay cosmology: in order not to bias the cosmology determination by $0.5\sigma$, the mean time delay fit accuracy must be better than 0.2%.
  • At linear order in cosmological perturbations, departures from the growth in the cosmological standard model can be quantified in terms of two functions of redshift $z$ and Fourier number $k$. Previous studies have performed principal component forecasts for several choices of these two functions, based on expected capabilities of upcoming large structure surveys. It is typically found that there will be many well-constrained degrees of freedom. However, not all and, probably most, of these degrees of freedom were physical if the parametrization had allowed for an arbitrary $k$-dependence. In this paper, we restrict the $k$-dependence to that allowed in local theories of gravity under the quasi-static approximation, i.e. ratios of polynomials in $k$, and identify the best constrained features in the ($z$,$k$)-dependence of the commonly considered functions $\mu$ and $\gamma$ as measured by an LSST-like weak lensing survey. We estimate the uncertainty in the measurements of the eigenmodes of modified growth. We find that imposing the theoretical prior on $k$-dependence reduces the number of degrees of freedom and the covariance between parameters. On the other hand, imaging surveys like LSST are not as sensitive to the $z$-dependence as they are to the $k$-dependence of the modified growth functions. This trade off provides us with, more or less, the same number of well-constrained eigenmodes (with respect to our prior) as found before, but now these modes are physical.
  • We perform a principal component analysis to assess ability of future observations to measure departures from General Relativity in predictions of the Poisson and anisotropy equations on linear scales. In particular, we focus on how the measurements of redshift-space distortions (RSD) observed from spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys will improve the constraints when combined with lensing tomographic surveys. Assuming a Euclid-like galaxy imaging and redshift survey, we find that adding the 3D information decreases the statistical uncertainty by a factor between 3 and 10 compared to the case when only observables from lensing tomographic surveys are used. We also find that the number of well-constrained modes increases by a factor between 3 and 7. Our study indicates the importance of joint galaxy imaging and redshift surveys such as SuMIRe and Euclid to give more stringent tests of the {\Lambda}CDM model and to distinguish between various modified gravity and dark energy models.
  • Cosmic microwave background measurements have pushed to higher resolution, lower noise, and more sky coverage. These data enable a unique test of the early universe's expansion rate and constituents such as effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom and dark energy. Using the most recent data from Planck and WMAP9, we constrain the expansion history in a model independent manner from today back to redshift z=10^5. The Hubble parameter is mapped to a few percent precision, limiting early dark energy and extra relativistic degrees of freedom within a model independent approach to 2-16% and 0.71 equivalent neutrino species respectively (95% CL). Within dark radiation, barotropic aether, and Doran-Robbers models, the early dark energy constraints are 3.3%, 1.9%, 1.2% respectively.
  • Strong gravitational lensing of time variable sources such as quasars and supernovae creates observable time delays between the multiple images. Time delays can provide a powerful cosmographic probe through the "time delay distance" involving the ratio of lens, source, and lens-source distances. However, lightcurves of lensed images have measurement gaps, noise, systematics such as microlensing from substructure along an image line of sight, and no a priori functional model, making robust time delay estimation challenging. Using Gaussian process techniques, we demonstrate success in accurate blind reconstruction of time delays and reduction in uncertainties for real data.
  • Any unified dark matter cosmology can be decomposed into dark matter interacting with vacuum energy, without introducing any additional degrees of freedom. We present observational constraints on an interacting vacuum plus dark energy corresponding to a generalised Chaplygin gas cosmology. We consider two distinct models for the interaction leading to either a barotropic equation of state or dark matter that follows geodesics, corresponding to a rest-frame sound speed equal to the adiabatic sound speed or zero sound speed, respectively. For the barotropic model, the most stringent constraint on $\alpha$ comes from the combination of CMB+SNIa+LSS(m) gives $\alpha<5.66\times10^{-6}$ at the 95% confidence level, which indicates that the barotropic model must be extremely close to the $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. For the case where the dark matter follows geodesics, perturbations have zero sound speed, and CMB+SNIa+gISW then gives the much weaker constraint $-0.15<\alpha<0.26$ at the 95% confidence level.
  • We examine the accuracy of the quasi-static approximation and a parametric form commonly employed for evolving linear perturbations in f(R) gravity theories and placing cosmological constraints. In particular, we analyze the nature and the importance of the near horizon effects that are often neglected. We find that for viable models, with a small present value of the scalaron field, such corrections are entirely negligible with no impact on observables. We also find that the one-parameter form, commonly used to represent the modified equations for linear perturbations in f(R), leads to theoretical systematic errors that are relatively small and, therefore, is adequate for placing constraint on f(R) models.
  • We study degeneracies between parameters in some of the widely used parametrized modified gravity models. We investigate how different observables from a future photometric weak lensing survey such as LSST, correlate the effects of these parameters and to what extent the degeneracies are broken. We also study the impact of other degenerate effects, namely massive neutrinos and some of the weak lensing systematics, on the correlations.
  • The next generation of weak lensing surveys will trace the evolution of matter perturbations and gravitational potentials from the matter dominated epoch until today. Along with constraining the dynamics of dark energy, they will probe the relations between matter overdensities, local curvature, and the Newtonian potential. We work with two functions of time and scale to account for any modifications of these relations in the linear regime from those in the LCDM model. We perform a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to find the eigenmodes and eigenvalues of these functions for surveys like DES and LSST. This paper builds on and significantly extends the PCA analysis of Zhao et al. (2009) in several ways. In particular, we consider the impact of some of the systematic effects expected in weak lensing surveys. We also present the PCA in terms of other choices of the two functions needed to parameterize modified growth on linear scales, and discuss their merits. We analyze the degeneracy between the modified growth functions and other cosmological parameters, paying special attention to the effective equation of state w(z). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the PCA as an efficient data compression stage which enables one to easily derive constraints on parameters of specific models without recalculating Fisher matrices from scratch.
  • We introduce a patch to the commonly used public codes CAMB and CosmoMC that allows the user to implement a general modification of the equations describing the growth of cosmological perturbations, while preserving the covariant conservation of the energy-momentum. This patch replaces the previously publicly released code MGCAMB, while also extending it in several ways. The new version removes the limitation of late-time-only modifications to the perturbed Einstein equations, and includes several parametrization introduced in the literature. To demonstrate the use of the patch, we obtain joint constraints on the neutrino mass and parameters of a scalar-tensor gravity model from CMB, SNe and ISW data as measured from the correlation of CMB with large scale structure.
  • We study the utility of wavelets for detecting the redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state w(z) from the combination of supernovae, CMB and BAO data. We show that local features in w, such as bumps, can be detected efficiently using wavelets. To demonstrate, we first generate a mock supernovae (SNe) data sample for a SNAP-like survey with a bump feature in w(z) hidden in, then successfully discover it by performing a blind wavelet analysis. We also apply our method to analyze the recently released "Constitution" SNe data, combined with WMAP and BAO from SDSS, and find weak hints of dark energy dynamics. Namely, we find that models with w(z) < -1 for 0.2 < z < 0.5, and w(z)> -1 for 0.5 < z <1, are mildly favored at 95% confidence level. This is in good agreement with several recent studies using other methods, such as redshift binning with principal component analysis (PCA) (e.g. Zhao and Zhang, arXiv:0908.1568)