• Quantum processors promise a paradigm shift in high-performance computing which needs to be assessed by accurate benchmarking measures. In this work, we introduce a new benchmark for variational quantum algorithm (VQA), recently proposed as a heuristic algorithm for small-scale quantum processors. In VQA, a classical optimization algorithm guides the quantum dynamics of the processor to yield the best solution for a given problem. A complete assessment of scalability and competitiveness of VQA should take into account both the quality and the time of dynamics optimization. The method of optimal stopping, employed here, provides such an assessment by explicitly including time as a cost factor. Here we showcase this measure for benchmarking VQA as a solver for some quadratic unconstrained binary optimization. Moreover we show that a better choice for the cost function of the classical routine can significantly improve the performance of the VQA algorithm and even improving it's scaling properties.
  • For a variety of superconducting qubits, tunable interactions are achieved through mutual inductive coupling to a coupler circuit containing a nonlinear Josephson element. In this paper we derive the general interaction mediated by such a circuit under the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation. This interaction naturally decomposes into a classical part, with origin in the classical circuit equations, and a quantum part, associated with the coupler's zero-point energy. Our result is non-perturbative in the qubit-coupler coupling strengths and in the coupler nonlinearity. This can lead to significant departures from previous, linear theories for the inter-qubit coupling, including non-stoquastic and many-body interactions. Our analysis provides explicit and efficiently computable series for any term in the interaction Hamiltonian and can be applied to any superconducting qubit type. We conclude with a numerical investigation of our theory using a case study of two coupled flux qubits, and in particular study the regime of validity of the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.
  • This paper presents an augmented Markovian system model for non-Markovian quantum systems. In this augmented system model, ancillary systems are introduced to play the role of internal modes of the non-Markovian environment converting white noise to colored noise. Consequently, non-Markovian dynamics are represented as resulting from direct interaction of the principal system with the ancillary system. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed augmented system model, it is applied to design whitening quantum filters for non-Markovian quantum systems. Examples are presented to illustrate how whitening quantum filters can be utilized for estimating non-Markovian linear quantum systems and qubit systems. In particular, we showed that the augmented Markovian formulation can be used to theoretically model the environment for an observed non-Markovian behavior in a recent experiment on quantum dots [ Phys. Rev. Lett., 108:046807, 2012]
  • We use Pontryagin's minimum principle to optimize variational quantum algorithms. We show that for a fixed computation time, the optimal evolution has a bang-bang (square pulse) form, both for closed and open quantum systems with Markovian decoherence. Our findings support the choice of evolution ansatz in the recently proposed Quantum Approximate Optimization Algorithm. Focusing on the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin-glass as an example, we find a system-size independent distribution of the duration of pulses, with characteristic time scale set by the inverse of the coupling constants in the Hamiltonian. The optimality of the bang-bang protocols and the characteristic time scale of the pulses provide an efficient parameterization of the protocol and inform the search for effective hybrid (classical and quantum) schemes for tackling combinatorial optimization problems. For the particular systems we study, we find numerically that the optimal nonadiabatic bang-bang protocols outperform conventional quantum annealing in the presence of weak white additive external noise and weak coupling to a thermal bath modeled with the Redfield master equation.
  • Temperature determines the relative probability of observing a physical system in an energy state when that system is energetically in equilibrium with its environment. In this paper, we present a theory for engineering the temperature of a quantum system different from its ambient temperature. We define criteria for an engineered quantum bath that, when coupled to a quantum system with Hamiltonian $H$, drives the system to the equilibrium state $\frac{e^{-H/T}}{{{\rm{Tr}}}(e^{-H/T})}$ with a tunable parameter $T$. This is basically an analog counterpart of the digital quantum metropolis algorithm. For a system of superconducting qubits, we propose a circuit-QED approximate realization of such an engineered thermal bath consisting of driven lossy resonators. Our proposal opens the path to simulate thermodynamical properties of many-body quantum systems of size not accessible to classical simulations. Also we discuss how an artificial thermal bath can serve as a temperature knob for a hybrid quantum-thermal annealer.
  • In this paper we present a Markovian representation approach to constructing quantum filters for a class of non-Markovian quantum systems disturbed by Lorenztian noise. An ancillary system is introduced to convert white noise into Lorentzian noise which is injected into a principal system via a direct interaction. The resulting dynamics of the principal system are non-Markovian, which are driven by the Lorentzian noise. By probing the principal system, a quantum filter for the augmented system can be derived from standard theory, where the conditional state of the principal system can be obtained by tracing out the ancillary system. An example is provided to illustrate the non-Markovian dynamics of the principal system.
  • In this paper, a quantum filter for estimating the states of a non-Markovian qubit system is presented in an augmented Markovian system framework including both the qubit system of interest and multi-ancillary systems for representing the internal modes of the non-Markovian environment. The colored noise generated by the multi-ancillary systems disturbs the qubit system via a direct interaction. The resulting non-Markovian dynamics of the qubit is determined by a memory kernel function arising from the dynamics of the ancillary system. In principle, colored noise with arbitrary power spectrum can be generated by a combination of Lorentzian noises. Hence, the quantum filter can be constructed for the qubit disturbed by arbitrary colored noise and the conditional state of the qubit system can be obtained by tracing out the multi-ancillary systems. An illustrative example is given to show the non-Markovian dynamics of the qubit system with Lorentzian noise.
  • Supralinear and sublinear pre-synaptic and dendritic integration is considered to be responsible for nonlinear computation power of biological neurons, emphasizing the role of nonlinear integration as opposed to nonlinear output thresholding. How, why, and to what degree the transfer function nonlinearity helps biologically inspired neural network models is not fully understood. Here, we study these questions in the context of echo state networks (ESN). ESN is a simple neural network architecture in which a fixed recurrent network is driven with an input signal, and the output is generated by a readout layer from the measurements of the network states. ESN architecture enjoys efficient training and good performance on certain signal-processing tasks, such as system identification and time series prediction. ESN performance has been analyzed with respect to the connectivity pattern in the network structure and the input bias. However, the effects of the transfer function in the network have not been studied systematically. Here, we use an approach tanh on the Taylor expansion of a frequently used transfer function, the hyperbolic tangent function, to systematically study the effect of increasing nonlinearity of the transfer function on the memory, nonlinear capacity, and signal processing performance of ESN. Interestingly, we find that a quadratic approximation is enough to capture the computational power of ESN with tanh function. The results of this study apply to both software and hardware implementation of ESN.
  • Echo state networks (ESN), a type of reservoir computing (RC) architecture, are efficient and accurate artificial neural systems for time series processing and learning. An ESN consists of a core of recurrent neural networks, called a reservoir, with a small number of tunable parameters to generate a high-dimensional representation of an input, and a readout layer which is easily trained using regression to produce a desired output from the reservoir states. Certain computational tasks involve real-time calculation of high-order time correlations, which requires nonlinear transformation either in the reservoir or the readout layer. Traditional ESN employs a reservoir with sigmoid or tanh function neurons. In contrast, some types of biological neurons obey response curves that can be described as a product unit rather than a sum and threshold. Inspired by this class of neurons, we introduce a RC architecture with a reservoir of product nodes for time series computation. We find that the product RC shows many properties of standard ESN such as short-term memory and nonlinear capacity. On standard benchmarks for chaotic prediction tasks, the product RC maintains the performance of a standard nonlinear ESN while being more amenable to mathematical analysis. Our study provides evidence that such networks are powerful in highly nonlinear tasks owing to high-order statistics generated by the recurrent product node reservoir.
  • Complete positivity of quantum dynamics is often viewed as a litmus test for physicality, yet it is well known that correlated initial states need not give rise to completely positive evolutions. This observation spurred numerous investigations over the past two decades attempting to identify necessary and sufficient conditions for complete positivity. Here we describe a complete and consistent mathematical framework for the discussion and analysis of complete positivity for correlated initial states of open quantum systems. This formalism is built upon a few simple axioms and is sufficiently general to contain all prior methodologies going back to Pechakas, PRL (1994). The key observation is that initial system-bath states with the same reduced state on the system must evolve under all admissible unitary operators to system-bath states with the same reduced state on the system, in order to ensure that the induced dynamical maps on the system are well-defined. Once this consistency condition is imposed, related concepts like the assignment map and the dynamical maps are uniquely defined. In general, the dynamical maps may not be applied to arbitrary system states, but only to those in an appropriately defined physical domain. We show that the constrained nature of the problem gives rise to not one but three inequivalent types of complete positivity. Using this framework we elucidate the limitations of recent attempts to provide conditions for complete positivity using quantum discord and the quantum data-processing inequality. The problem remains open, and may require fresh perspectives and new mathematical tools. The formalism presented herein may be one step in that direction.
  • Quantum tunneling, a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers above the energy of the state itself, has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization. Here we show that multiqubit tunneling plays a computational role in a currently available, albeit noisy, programmable quantum annealer. We develop a non-perturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics predicting the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunneling. We devise a computational primitive with 16 qubits where quantum evolutions enable tunneling to the global minimum while the corresponding classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunneling can outperform thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. Our results indicate that many-body quantum phenomena could be used for finding better solutions to hard optimization problems.
  • Quantum tunneling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers above the energy of the state itself. Tunneling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization. Here we present the first experimental evidence of a computational role of multiqubit quantum tunneling in the evolution of a programmable quantum annealer. We develop a theoretical model based on a NIBA Quantum Master Equation to describe the multiqubit dissipative tunneling effects under the complex noise characteristics of such quantum devices. We start by considering a computational primitive, an optimization problem consisting of just one global and one false minimum. The quantum evolutions enable tunneling to the global minimum while the corresponding classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In our study the non-convex potentials are realized by frustrated networks of qubit clusters with strong intra-cluster coupling. We show that the collective effect of the quantum environment is suppressed in the "critical" phase during the evolution where quantum tunneling "decides" the right path to solution. In a later stage dissipation facilitates the multiqubit tunneling leading to the solution state. The predictions of the model accurately describe the experimental data from the D-Wave Two quantum annealer at NASA Ames. In our computational primitive the temperature dependence of the probability of success in the quantum model is opposite to that of the classical paths with thermal hopping. Specifically, we provide an analysis of an optimization problem with sixteen qubits, demonstrating eight qubit tunneling that increases success probabilities. Furthermore, we report results for larger problems with up to 200 qubits that contain the primitive as subproblems.
  • Quantum process tomography provides a means of measuring the evolution operator for a system at a fixed measurement time $t$. The problem of using that tomographic snapshot to predict the evolution operator at other times is generally ill-posed since there are, in general, infinitely many distinct and compatible solutions. We describe the prediction, in some ``maximal ignorance'' sense, of the evolution of a quantum system based on knowledge only of the evolution operator for finitely many times $0<\tau_{1}<\dots<\tau_{M}$ with $M\geq 1$. To resolve the ill-posedness problem, we construct this prediction as the result of an average over some unknown (and unknowable) variables. The resulting prediction provides a description of the observer's state of knowledge of the system's evolution at times away from the measurement times. Even if the original evolution is unitary, the predicted evolution is described by a non-unitary, completely positive map.
  • Quantum control is an essential tool for the operation of quantum technologies such as quantum computers, simulators, and sensors. Although there are sophisticated theoretical tools for developing quantum control protocols, formulating optimal protocols while incorporating experimental conditions remains a challenge. In this paper, motivated by recent advances in realization of real-time feedback control in circuit quantum electrodynamics systems, we study the effect of experimental imperfections on the optimality of qubit purification protocols. Specifically, we find that the optimal control solutions in the presence of detector inefficiency and non-negligible decoherence can be significantly different from the known solutions to idealized dynamical models. In addition, we present a simplified form of the verification theorem to examine the global optimality of a control protocol.
  • Underlying physical principles for the high efficiency of excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes are not fully understood. Notably, the degree of robustness of these systems for transporting energy is not known considering their realistic interactions with vibrational and radiative environments within the surrounding solvent and scaffold proteins. In this work, we employ an efficient technique to estimate energy transfer efficiency of such complex excitonic systems. We observe that the dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex leads to optimal and robust energy transport due to a convergence of energy scales among all important internal and external parameters. In particular, we show that the FMO energy transfer efficiency is optimum and stable with respect to the relevant parameters of environmental interactions and Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian including reorganization energy $\lambda$, bath frequency cutoff $\gamma$, temperature $T$, bath spatial correlations, initial excitations, dissipation rate, trapping rate, disorders, and dipole moments orientations. We identify the ratio of $\lambda T/\gamma\*g$ as a single key parameter governing quantum transport efficiency, where g is the average excitonic energy gap.
  • The fundamental physical mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes is not yet fully understood. In particular, the degree of efficiency or sensitivity of these systems for energy transfer is not known given their non-perturbative and non-Markovian interactions with proteins backbone and surrounding photonic and phononic environments. One major problem in studying light-harvesting complexes has been the lack of an efficient method for simulation of their dynamics in biological environments. To this end, here we revisit the second-order time-convolution (TC2) master equation and examine its reliability beyond extreme Markovian and perturbative limits. In particular, we present a derivation of TC2 without making the usual weak system-bath coupling assumption. Using this equation, we explore the long time behaviour of exciton dynamics of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex. Moreover, we introduce a constructive error analysis to estimate the accuracy of TC2 equation in calculating energy transfer efficiency, exhibiting reliable performance for environments with weak and intermediate memory and strength. Furthermore, we numerically show that energy transfer efficiency is optimal and robust for the FMO protein complex of green sulphur bacteria with respect to variations in reorganization energy and bath correlation time-scales.
  • Excitonic transport in photosynthesis exhibits a wide range of time scales. Absorption and initial relaxation takes place over tens of femtoseconds. Excitonic lifetimes are on the order of a nanosecond. Hopping rates, energy differences between chromophores, reorganization energies, and decoherence rates correspond to time scales on the order of picoseconds. The functional nature of the divergence of time scales is easily understood: strong coupling to the electromagnetic field over a broad band of frequencies yields rapid absorption, while long excitonic lifetimes increase the amount of energy that makes its way to the reaction center to be converted to chemical energy. The convergence of the remaining time scales to the centerpoint of the overall temporal range is harder to understand. In this paper we argue that the convergence of timescales in photosynthesis can be understood as an example of the `quantum Goldilocks effect': natural selection tends to drive quantum systems to the degree of quantum coherence that is `just right' for attaining maximum efficiency. We provide a general theory of optimal and robust, efficient transport in quantum systems, and show that it is governed by a single parameter.
  • While feedback control has many applications in quantum systems, finding optimal control protocols for this task is generally challenging. So-called "verification theorems" and "viscosity solutions" provide two useful tools for this purpose: together they give a simple method to check whether any given protocol is optimal, and provide a numerical method for finding optimal protocols. While treatments of verification theorems usually use sophisticated mathematical language, this is not necessary. In this article we give a simple introduction to feedback control in quantum systems, and then describe verification theorems and viscosity solutions in simple language. We also illustrate their use with a concrete example of current interest.
  • For quantum systems with high purity, we find all observables that, when continuously monitored, maximize the instantaneous reduction in the von Neumann entropy. This allows us to obtain all locally optimal feedback protocols with strong feedback, and explicit expressions for the best such protocols for systems of size N <= 4. We also show that for a qutrit the locally optimal protocol is the optimal protocol for a given range of control times, and derive an upper bound on all optimal protocols with strong feedback.
  • A new post-Markovian quantum master equation is derived, that includes bath memory effects via a phenomenologically introduced memory kernel k(t). The derivation uses as a formal tool a probabilistic single-shot bath-measurement process performed during the coupled system-bath evolution. The resulting analytically solvable master equation interpolates between the exact Nakajima-Zwanzig equation and the Markovian Lindblad equation. A necessary and sufficient condition for complete positivity in terms of properties of k(t) is presented, in addition to a prescription for the experimental determination of k(t). The formalism is illustrated with examples.