• State-of-the-art robotic hand prosthetics generate finger and wrist movement through pattern recognition (PR) algorithms using features of forearm electromyogram (EMG) signals, but re- quires extensive training and is prone to poor predictions for conditions outside the training data (Peerdeman et al., 2011; Scheme et al., 2010). We propose a novel approach to develop a dynamic robotic limb by utilizing the recent history of EMG signals in a model that accounts for physiological features of hand movement which are ignored by PR algorithms. We do this by viewing EMG signals as functional covariates and develop a functional linear model that quantifies the effect of the EMG signals on finger/wrist velocity through a bivariate coefficient function that is allowed to vary with current finger/wrist position. The model is made par- simonious and interpretable through a two-step variable selection procedure, called Sequential Adaptive Functional Empirical group LASSO (SAFE-gLASSO). Numerical studies show excel- lent selection and prediction properties of SAFE-gLASSO compared to popular alternatives. For our motivating dataset, the method correctly identifies the few EMG signals that are known to be important for an able-bodied subject with negligible false positives and the model can be directly implemented in a robotic prosthetic.
  • We study the problem of sparse signal detection on a spatial domain. We propose a novel approach to model continuous signals that are sparse and piecewise smooth as product of independent Gaussian processes (PING) with a smooth covariance kernel. The smoothness of the PING process is ensured by the smoothness of the covariance kernels of Gaussian components in the product, and sparsity is controlled by the number of components. The bivariate kurtosis of the PING process shows more components in the product results in thicker tail and sharper peak at zero. The simulation results demonstrate the improvement in estimation using the PING prior over Gaussian process (GP) prior for different image regressions. We apply our method to a longitudinal MRI dataset to detect the regions that are affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) in the greatest magnitude through an image-on-scalar regression model. Due to huge dimensionality of these images, we transform the data into the spectral domain and develop methods to conduct computation in this domain. In our MS imaging study, the estimates from the PING model are more informative than those from the GP model.
  • This article develops flexible methodology to study the association between scalar outcomes and functional predictors observed over time, at many instances, in longitudinal studies. We propose a parsimonious modeling framework to study time-varying regression that leads to superior prediction properties and allows to reconstruct full trajectories of the response. The idea is to model the time-varying functional predictors using orthogonal basis functions and expand the time-varying regression coefficient using the same basis. Numerical investigation through simulation studies and data analysis show excellent performance in terms of accurate prediction and efficient computations, when compared with existing alternatives. The methods are inspired and applied to an animal science application, where of interest is to study the association between the feed intake of lactating sows and the minute-by-minute {temperature} throughout the 21st days of their lactation period. R code and an R illustration are provided at http://www4.stat.ncsu.edu/~staicu/software
  • A scalar-response functional model describes the association between a scalar response and a set of functional covariates. An important problem in the functional data literature is to test the nullity or linearity of the effect of the functional covariate in the context of scalar-on-function regression. This article provides an overview of the existing methods for testing both the null hypotheses that there is no relationship and that there is a linear relationship between the functional covariate and scalar response, and a comprehensive numerical comparison of their performance. The methods are compared for a variety of realistic scenarios: when the functional covariate is observed at dense or sparse grids and measurements include noise or not. Finally, the methods are illustrated on the Tecator data set.
  • We study additive function-on-function regression where the mean response at a particular time point depends on the time point itself as well as the entire covariate trajectory. We develop a computationally efficient estimation methodology based on a novel combination of spline bases with an eigenbasis to represent the trivariate kernel function. We discuss prediction of a new response trajectory, propose an inference procedure that accounts for total variability in the predicted response curves, and construct pointwise prediction intervals. The estimation/inferential procedure accommodates realistic scenarios such as correlated error structure as well as sparse and/or irregular designs. We investigate our methodology in finite sample size through simulations and two real data applications.
  • We propose simple inferential approaches for the fixed effects in complex functional mixed effects models. We estimate the fixed effects under the independence of functional residuals assumption and then bootstrap independent units (e.g. subjects) to estimate the variability of and conduct inference in the form of hypothesis testing on the fixed effects parameters. Simulations show excellent coverage probability of the confidence intervals and size of tests. Methods are motivated by and applied to the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), though they are applicable to other studies that collect correlated functional data.
  • We propose a novel modeling framework to study the effect of covariates of various types on the conditional distribution of the response. The methodology accommodates flexible model structure, allows for joint estimation of the quantiles at all levels, and involves a computationally efficient estimation algorithm. Extensive numerical investigation confirms good performance of the proposed method. The methodology is motivated by and applied to a lactating sow study, where the primary interest is to understand how the dynamic change of minute-by-minute temperature in the farrowing rooms within a day (functional covariate) is associated with low quantiles of feed intake of lactating sows, while accounting for other sow-specific information (vector covariate).
  • The focus of this work is on spatial variable selection for scalar-on-image regression. We propose a new class of Bayesian nonparametric models, soft-thresholded Gaussian processes and develop the efficient posterior computation algorithms. Theoretically, soft-thresholded Gaussian processes provide large prior support for the spatially varying coefficients that enjoy piecewise smoothness, sparsity and continuity, characterizing the important features of imaging data. Also, under some mild regularity conditions, the soft-thresholded Gaussian process leads to the posterior consistency for both parameter estimation and variable selection for scalar-on-image regression, even when the number of true predictors is larger than the sample size. The proposed method is illustrated via simulations, compared numerically with existing alternatives and applied to Electroencephalography (EEG) study of alcoholism.
  • In this paper we study statistical inference in functional quantile regression for scalar response and a functional covariate. Specifically, we consider linear functional quantile model where the effect of the covariate on the quantile of the response is modeled through the inner product between the functional covariate and an unknown smooth regression parameter function that varies with the level of quantile. The objective is to test that the regression parameter is constant across several quantile levels of interest. The parameter function is estimated by combining ideas from functional principal component analysis and quantile regression. We establish asymptotic properties of the parameter function estimator, for a single quantile level as well as for a set of quantile levels. An adjusted Wald testing procedure is proposed for this hypothesis of interest and its chi-square asymptotic null distribution is derived. The testing procedure is investigated numerically in simulations involving sparsely and noisy functional covariates and in the capital bike share study application. The proposed approach is easy to implement and the {\tt R} code is published online.
  • We propose a Bayesian modeling framework for jointly analyzing multiple functional responses of different types (e.g. binary and continuous data). Our approach is based on a multivariate latent Gaussian process and models the dependence among the functional responses through the dependence of the latent process. Our framework easily accommodates additional covariates. We offer a way to estimate the multivariate latent covariance, allowing for implementation of multivariate functional principal components analysis (FPCA) to specify basis expansions and simplify computation. We demonstrate our method through both simulation studies and an application to real data from a periodontal study.
  • We consider analysis of dependent functional data that are correlated because of a longitudinal-based design: each subject is observed at repeated time visits and for each visit we record a functional variable. We propose a novel parsimonious modeling framework for the repeatedly observed functional variables that allows to extract low dimensional features. The proposed methodology accounts for the longitudinal design, is designed for the study of the dynamic behavior of the underlying process, and is computationally fast. Theoretical properties of this framework are studied and numerical investigation confirms excellent behavior in finite samples. The proposed method is motivated by and applied to a diffusion tensor imaging study of multiple sclerosis. Using Shiny (Chang et al., 2015) we implement interactive plots to help visualize longitudinal functional data as well as the various components and prediction obtained using the proposed method.
  • We propose an extensive framework for additive regression models for correlated functional responses, allowing for multiple partially nested or crossed functional random effects with flexible correlation structures for, e.g., spatial, temporal, or longitudinal functional data. Additionally, our framework includes linear and nonlinear effects of functional and scalar covariates that may vary smoothly over the index of the functional response. It accommodates densely or sparsely observed functional responses and predictors which may be observed with additional error and includes both spline-based and functional principal component-based terms. Estimation and inference in this framework is based on standard additive mixed models, allowing us to take advantage of established methods and robust, flexible algorithms. We provide easy-to-use open source software in the pffr() function for the R-package refund. Simulations show that the proposed method recovers relevant effects reliably, handles small sample sizes well and also scales to larger data sets. Applications with spatially and longitudinally observed functional data demonstrate the flexibility in modeling and interpretability of results of our approach.
  • Second order approximate ancillaries have evolved as the primary ingredient for recent likelihood development in statistical inference. This uses quantile functions rather than the equivalent distribution functions, and the intrinsic ancillary contour is given explicitly as the plug-in estimate of the vector quantile function. The derivation uses a Taylor expansion of the full quantile function, and the linear term gives a tangent to the observed ancillary contour. For the scalar parameter case, there is a vector field that integrates to give the ancillary contours, but for the vector case, there are multiple vector fields and the Frobenius conditions for mutual consistency may not hold. We demonstrate, however, that the conditions hold in a restricted way and that this verifies the second order ancillary contours in moderate deviations. The methodology can generate an appropriate exact ancillary when such exists or an approximate ancillary for the numerical or Monte Carlo calculation of $p$-values and confidence quantiles. Examples are given, including nonlinear regression and several enigmatic examples from the literature.