• Experimentally, baryon number minus lepton number, $B-L$, appears to be a good global symmetry of nature. We explore the consequences of the existence of gauge-singlet scalar fields charged under $B-L$ -- dubbed lepton-number-charged scalars, LeNCS -- and postulate that these couple to the standard model degrees of freedom in such a way that $B-L$ is conserved even at the non-renormalizable level. In this framework, neutrinos are Dirac fermions. Including only the lowest mass-dimension effective operators, some of the LeNCS couple predominantly to neutrinos and may be produced in terrestrial neutrino experiments. We examine several existing constraints from particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology to the existence of a LeNCS carrying $B-L$ charge equal to two, and discuss the emission of LeNCS's via "neutrino beamstrahlung," which occurs every once in a while when neutrinos scatter off of ordinary matter. We identify regions of the parameter space where existing and future neutrino experiments, including the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, are at the frontier of searches for such new phenomena.
  • All pieces of concrete evidence for phenomena outside the standard model (SM) - neutrino masses and dark matter - are consistent with the existence of new degrees of freedom that interact very weakly, if at all, with those in the SM. We propose that these new degrees of freedom organize themselves into a simple dark sector, a chiral SU(3) x SU(2) gauge theory with the smallest nontrivial fermion content. Similar to the SM, the dark SU(2) is spontaneously broken while the dark SU(3) confines at low energies. At the renormalizable level, the dark sector contains massless fermions - dark leptons - and stable massive particles - dark protons. We find that dark protons with masses between 10-100 TeV satisfy all current cosmological and astrophysical observations concerning dark matter even if dark protons are a symmetric thermal relic. The dark leptons play the role of right-handed neutrinos and allow simple realizations of the seesaw mechanism or the possibility that neutrinos are Dirac fermions. In the latter case, neutrino masses are also parametrically different from charged-fermion masses and the lightest neutrino is predicted to be massless. Since the new "neutrino" and "dark matter" degrees of freedom interact with one another, these two new-physics phenomena are intertwined. Dark leptons play a nontrivial role in early universe cosmology while indirect searches for dark matter involve, decisively, dark matter annihilations into dark leptons. These, in turn, may lead to observable signatures at high-energy neutrino and gamma-ray observatories, especially once one accounts for the potential Sommerfeld enhancement of the annihilation cross-section, derived from the low-energy dark-sector effective theory, a possibility we explore quantitatively in some detail.
  • Testing, in a non-trivial, model-independent way, the hypothesis that the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm properly describes nature is among the main goals of the current and the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. In the coming decade, the DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande experiments will be able to study the oscillation of both neutrinos and antineutrinos with unprecedented precision. We explore the ability of these experiments, and combinations of them, to determine whether the parameters that govern these oscillations are the same for neutrinos and antineutrinos, as prescribed by the CPT-theorem. We find that both DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande will be sensitive to unexplored levels of leptonic CPT-violation. Assuming the parameters for neutrino and antineutrinos are unrelated, we discuss the ability of these experiments to determine the neutrino and antineutrino mass-hierarchies, atmospheric-mixing octants, and CP-odd phases, three key milestones of the experimental neutrino physics program. Additionally, if the CPT-theorem is violated in nature in a way that is consistent with all present neutrino and antineutrino oscillation data, we find that DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande have the potential to ultimately establish CPT-invariance violation.
  • There is no guarantee that the violation of lepton number, assuming it exists, will primarily manifest itself in neutrinoless double beta decay ($0\nu\beta\beta$). Lepton-number violation and lepton-flavor violation may be related, and much-needed information regarding the physics that violates lepton number can be learned by exploring observables that violate lepton flavors other than electron flavor. One of the most promising observables is $\mu^- \rightarrow e^+$ conversion, which can be explored by experiments that are specifically designed to search for $\mu^- \rightarrow e^-$ conversion. We survey lepton-number-violating dimension-five, -seven, and -nine effective operators in the standard model and discuss the relationships between Majorana neutrino masses and the rates for $0\nu\beta\beta$ and $\mu^- \rightarrow e^+$ conversion. While $0\nu\beta\beta$ has the greatest sensitivity to new ultraviolet energy scales, its rate might be suppressed by the new physics relationship to lepton flavor, and $\mu^- \rightarrow e^+$ conversion offers a complementary probe of lepton-number-violating physics.
  • Andreas S. Kronfeld, Robert S. Tschirhart, Usama Al-Binni, Wolfgang Altmannshofer, Charles Ankenbrandt, Kaladi Babu, Sunanda Banerjee, Matthew Bass, Brian Batell, David V. Baxter, Zurab Berezhiani, Marc Bergevin, Robert Bernstein, Sudeb Bhattacharya, Mary Bishai, Thomas Blum, S. Alex Bogacz, Stephen J. Brice, Joachim Brod, Alan Bross, Michael Buchoff, Thomas W. Burgess, Marcela Carena, Luis A. Castellanos, Subhasis Chattopadhyay, Mu-Chun Chen, Daniel Cherdack, Norman H. Christ, Tim Chupp, Vincenzo Cirigliano, Pilar Coloma, Christopher E. Coppola, Ramanath Cowsik, J. Allen Crabtree, André de Gouvêa, Jean-Pierre Delahaye, Dmitri Denisov, Patrick deNiverville, Ranjan Dharmapalan, Markus Diefenthaler, Alexander Dolgov, Georgi Dvali, Estia Eichten, Jürgen Engelfried, Phillip D. Ferguson, Tony Gabriel, Avraham Gal, Franz Gallmeier, Kenneth S. Ganezer, Susan Gardner, Douglas Glenzinski, Stephen Godfrey, Elena S. Golubeva, Stefania Gori, Van B. Graves, Geoffrey Greene, Cory L. Griffard, Ulrich Haisch, Thomas Handler, Brandon Hartfiel, Athanasios Hatzikoutelis, Ayman Hawari, Lawrence Heilbronn, James E. Hill, Patrick Huber, David E. Jaffe, Xiaodong Jiang, Christian Johnson, Yuri Kamyshkov, Daniel M. Kaplan, Boris Kerbikov, Brendan Kiburg, Harold G. Kirk, Andreas Klein, Kyle Knoepfel, Boris Kopeliovich, Vladimir Kopeliovich, Joachim Kopp, Wolfgang Korsch, Graham Kribs, Ronald Lipton, Chen-Yu Liu, Wolfgang Lorenzon, Zheng-Tian Lu, Naomi C. R. Makins, David McKeen, Geoffrey Mills, Michael Mocko, Rabindra Mohapatra, Nikolai V. Mokhov, Guenter Muhrer, Pieter Mumm, David Neuffer, Lev Okun, Mark A. Palmer, Robert Palmer, Robert W. Pattie Jr., David G. Phillips II, Kevin Pitts, Maxim Pospelov, Vitaly S. Pronskikh, Chris Quigg, Erik Ramberg, Amlan Ray, Paul E. Reimer, David G. Richards, Adam Ritz, Amit Roy, Arthur Ruggles, Robert Ryne, Utpal Sarkar, Andy Saunders, Yannis K. Semertzidis, Anatoly Serebrov, Hirohiko Shimizu, Robert Shrock, Arindam K. Sikdar, Pavel V. Snopok, William M. Snow, Aria Soha, Stefan Spanier, Sergei Striganov, Zhaowen Tang, Lawrence Townsend, Jon Urheim, Arkady Vainshtein, Richard Van de Water, Ruth S. Van de Water, Richard J. Van Kooten, Bernard Wehring, William C. Wester III, Lisa Whitehead, Robert J. Wilson, Elizabeth Worcester, Albert R. Young, Geralyn Zeller
    Part 2 of "Project X: Accelerator Reference Design, Physics Opportunities, Broader Impacts". In this Part, we outline the particle-physics program that can be achieved with Project X, a staged superconducting linac for intensity-frontier particle physics. Topics include neutrino physics, kaon physics, muon physics, electric dipole moments, neutron-antineutron oscillations, new light particles, hadron structure, hadron spectroscopy, and lattice-QCD calculations. Part 1 is available as arXiv:1306.5022 [physics.acc-ph] and Part 3 is available as arXiv:1306.5024 [physics.acc-ph].
  • One of the main goals of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is to look for new sources of CP-invariance violation. Another is to significantly test the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm. Here, we show that there are CP-invariant new physics scenarios which, as far as DUNE data are concerned, cannot be distinguished from the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm with very large CP-invariance violating effects. We discuss examples with non-standard neutrino interactions and with a fourth neutrino mass eigenstate. We briefly discuss how ambiguities can be resolved by combining DUNE data with data from other long-baseline experiments, including Hyper-Kamiokande.
  • Inspired by the Standard Model of particle physics, we discuss a mechanism for constructing chiral, anomaly-free gauge theories. The gauge symmetries and particle content of such theories are identified using subgroups and complex representations of simple anomaly-free Lie groups, such as $SO(10)$ or $E_6$. We explore, using mostly $SO(10)$ and the $\mathbf{16}$ representation, several of these "imperfect copies" of the Standard Model, including $U(1)^N$ theories, $SU(5)\otimes U(1)$ theories, $SU(4)\otimes U(1)^2$ theories with 4-plets and 6-plets, and chiral $SU(3)\otimes SU(2)\otimes U(1)$. A few general properties of such theories are discussed, as well as how they might shed light on nonzero neutrino masses, the dark matter puzzle, and other phenomenologically relevant questions.
  • We investigate the potential of the long-baseline Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) to study large-extra-dimension (LED) models originally proposed to explain the smallness of neutrino masses by postulating that right-handed neutrinos, unlike all standard model fermion fields, can propagate in the bulk. The massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the right-handed neutrino fields modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities and can hence affect their propagation. We show that, as far as DUNE is concerned, the LED model is indistinguishable from a $(3 + 3N)$-neutrino framework for modest values of $N$; $N$ = 1 is usually a very good approximation. Nonetheless, there are no new sources of $CP$-invariance violation other than one $CP$-odd phase that can be easily mapped onto the $CP$-odd phase in the standard three-neutrino paradigm. We analyze the sensitivity of DUNE to the LED framework, and explore the capability of DUNE to differentiate the LED model from the three-neutrino scenario and from a generic $(3 + 1)$-neutrino model.
  • We estimate constraints on the existence of a heavy, mostly sterile neutrino with mass between 10 eV and 1 TeV. We improve upon previous analyses by performing a global combination and expanding the experimental inputs to simultaneously include tests for lepton universality, lepton-flavor-violating processes, electroweak precision data, dipole moments, and neutrinoless double beta decay. Assuming the heavy neutrino and its decay products are invisible to detection, we further include, in a self-consistent manner, constraints from direct kinematic searches, the kinematics of muon decay, cosmology, and neutrino oscillations, in order to estimate constraints on the values of $|U_{e4}|^2$, $|U_{\mu4}|^2$, and $|U_{\tau4}|^2$.
  • We explore the effects of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) and how they modify neutrino propagation in the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). We find that NSI can significantly modify the data to be collected by the DUNE experiment as long as the new physics parameters are large enough. For example, If the DUNE data are consistent with the standard three-massive-neutrinos paradigm, order 0.1 (in units of the Fermi constant) NSI effects will be ruled out. On the other hand, if large NSI effects are present, DUNE will be able to not only rule out the standard paradigm but also measure the new physics parameters, sometimes with good precision. We find that, in some cases, DUNE is sensitive to new sources of CP-invariance violation. We also explored whether DUNE data can be used to distinguish different types of new physics beyond nonzero neutrino masses. In more detail, we asked whether NSI can be mimicked, as far as the DUNE setup is concerned, by the hypothesis that there is a new light neutrino state.
  • We investigate the potential for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) to probe the existence and effects of a fourth neutrino mass-eigenstate. We study the mixing of the fourth mass-eigenstate with the three active neutrinos of the Standard Model, including the effects of new sources of CP-invariance violation, for a wide range of new mass-squared differences, from lower than 10^-5 eV^2 to higher than 1 eV^2. DUNE is sensitive to previously unexplored regions of the mixing angle - mass-squared difference parameter space. If there is a fourth neutrino, in some regions of the parameter space, DUNE is able to measure the new oscillation parameters (some very precisely) and clearly identify two independent sources of CP-invariance violation. Finally, we use the hypothesis that there are four neutrino mass-eigenstates in order to ascertain how well DUNE can test the limits of the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm. In this way, we briefly explore whether light sterile neutrinos can serve as proxies for other, in principle unknown, phenomena that might manifest themselves in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.
  • We propose that all light fermionic degrees of freedom, including the Standard Model (SM) fermions and all possible light beyond-the-standard-model fields, are chiral with respect to some spontaneously broken abelian gauge symmetry. Hypercharge, for example, plays this role for the SM fermions. We introduce a new symmetry, $U(1)_{\nu}$, for all new light fermionic states. Anomaly cancellations mandate the existence of several new fermion fields with nontrivial $U(1)_{\nu}$ charges. We develop a concrete model of this type, for which we show that (i) some fermions remain massless after $U(1)_{\nu}$ breaking -- similar to SM neutrinos -- and (ii) accidental global symmetries translate into stable massive particles -- similar to SM protons. These ingredients provide a solution to the dark matter and neutrino mass puzzles assuming one also postulates the existence of heavy degrees of freedom that act as "mediators" between the two sectors. The neutrino mass mechanism described here leads to parametrically small Dirac neutrino masses, and the model also requires the existence of at least four Dirac sterile neutrinos. Finally, we describe a general technique to write down chiral-fermions-only models that are at least anomaly-free under a $U(1)$ gauge symmetry.
  • April 19, 2015 hep-ph, hep-ex
    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, $\tau\to 3\mu$ and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals - scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed. We demonstrate that the SHiP experiment has a unique potential to discover new physics and can directly probe a number of solutions of beyond the Standard Model puzzles, such as neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the Universe, dark matter, and inflation
  • New neutrino degrees of freedom allow for more sources of CP-invariance violation (CPV). We explore the requirements for accessing CP-odd mixing parameters in the so-called 3+1 scenario, where one assumes the existence of one extra, mostly sterile neutrino degree of freedom, heavier than the other three mass eigenstates. As a first step, we concentrate on the nu_e to nu_mu appearance channel in a hypothetical, upgraded version of the nuSTORM proposal. We establish that the optimal baseline for CPV studies depends strongly on the value of Delta m^2_14 -- the new mass-squared difference -- and that the ability to observe CPV depends significantly on whether the experiment is performed at the optimal baseline. Even at the optimal baseline, it is very challenging to see CPV in 3+1 scenarios if one considers only one appearance channel. Full exploration of CPV in short-baseline experiments will require precision measurements of tau-appearance, a challenge significantly beyond what is currently being explored by the experimental neutrino community.
  • Neutrino propagation in space-time is not constrained to be unitary if very light states - lighter than the active neutrinos - exist into which neutrinos may decay. If this is the case, neutrino flavor-change is governed by a handful of extra mixing and "oscillation" parameters, including new sources of CP-invariance violation. We compute the transition probabilities in the two- and three-flavor scenarios and discuss the different phenomenological consequences of the new physics. These are qualitatively different from other sources of unitarity violation discussed in the literature.
  • We explore, mostly using data from solar neutrino experiments, the hypothesis that the neutrino mass eigenstates are unstable. We find that, by combining $^8$B solar neutrino data with those on $^7$Be and lower-energy solar neutrinos, one obtains a mostly model-independent bound on both the $\nu_1$ and $\nu_2$ lifetimes. We comment on whether a nonzero neutrino decay width can improve the compatibility of the solar neutrino data with the massive neutrino hypothesis.
  • If grand unification is real, searches for baryon-number violation should be included on the list of observables that may reveal information regarding the origin of neutrino masses. Making use of an effective-operator approach and assuming that nature is SU(5) invariant at very short distances, we estimate the consequences of different scenarios that lead to light Majorana neutrinos for low-energy phenomena that violate baryon number minus lepton number (B-L) by two (or more) units, including neutron-antineutron oscillations and B-L violating nucleon decays. We find that, among all possible effective theories of lepton-number violation that lead to nonzero neutrino masses, only a subset is, broadly speaking, consistent with grand unification.
  • With the discovery of a particle that seems rather consistent with the minimal Standard Model Higgs boson, attention turns to questions of naturalness, fine-tuning, and what they imply for physics beyond the Standard Model and its discovery prospects at run II of the LHC. In this article we revisit the issue of naturalness, discussing some implicit assumptions that underly some of the most common statements, which tend to assign physical significance to certain regularization procedures. Vague arguments concerning fine-tuning can lead to conclusions that are too strong and perhaps not as generic as one would hope. Instead, we explore a more pragmatic definition of the hierarchy problem that does not rely on peeking beyond the murky boundaries of quantum field theory: we investigate the fine-tuning of the electroweak scale associated with thresholds from heavy particles, which is both calculable and dependent on the nature of the would-be ultraviolet completion of the Standard Model. We discuss different manifestations of new high-energy scales that are favored by experimental hints for new physics with an eye toward making use of fine-tuning in order to determine natural regions of the new physics parameter spaces.
  • Neutrino masses are clear evidence for physics beyond the standard model and much more remains to be understood about the neutrino sector. We highlight some of the outstanding questions and research opportunities in neutrino theory. We show that most of these questions are directly connected to the very rich experimental program currently being pursued (or at least under serious consideration) in the United States and worldwide. Finally, we also comment on the state of the theoretical neutrino physics community in the U.S.
  • The observation of new physics events with large missing transverse energy at the LHC would potentially serve as evidence for the direct production of dark matter. A crucial step toward verifying such evidence is the measurement of the would-be dark matter mass. If, for example, the invisible particles are found to have masses consistent with zero, it may prove very challenging to ascertain whether light dark matter or neutrinos are being observed. We assume that new invisible particles are pair-produced in a ttbar-like topology and use two MT2-based methods to measure the masses of the particles associated with the missing energy. Instead of simulating events and backgrounds, we estimate the uncertainty associated with measuring the mass of the invisible particle by assuming a fixed value of the uncertainty associated with the location of the MT2 endpoint. We find that if this uncertainty associated with measuring the MT2 endpoints is, quite optimistically, O(1 GeV), the invisible particles must have masses greater than O(10 GeV) so they can be distinguished from massless ones at 95% CL. If the results from the CoGeNT, DAMA/LIBRA, and CRESST experiments have indeed revealed the existence of light dark matter with mass O(10 GeV), our results suggest that it may be difficult for the LHC to distinguish dark matter from neutrinos solely via mass measurements.
  • The Standard Model calculation of $H\rightarrow\gamma\gamma$ has the curious feature of being finite but regulator-dependent. While dimensional regularization yields a result which respects the electromagnetic Ward identities, additional terms which violate gauge invariance arise if the calculation is done setting $d=4$. This discrepancy between the $d=4-\epsilon$ and $d=4$ results is recognized as a true ambiguity which must be resolved using physics input; as dimensional regularization respects gauge invariance, the $d=4-\epsilon$ calculation is accepted as the correct SM result. However, here we point out another possibility; working in analogy with the gauge chiral anomaly, we note that it is possible that the individual diagrams do violate the electromagnetic Ward identities, but that the gauge-invariance-violating terms cancel when all contributions to $H\rightarrow\gamma\gamma$, both from the SM and from new physics, are included. We thus examine the consequences of the hypothesis that the $d=4$ calculation is valid, but that such a cancellation occurs. We work in general renormalizable gauge, thus avoiding issues with momentum routing ambiguities. We point out that the gauge-invariance-violating terms in $d=4$ arise not just for the diagram containing a SM $W^{\pm}$ boson, but also for general fermion and scalar loops, and relate these terms to a lack of shift invariance in Higgs tadpole diagrams. We then derive the analogue of "anomaly cancellation conditions", and find consequences for solutions to the hierarchy problem. In particular, we find that supersymmetry obeys these conditions, even if it is softly broken at an arbitrarily high scale.
  • The physics responsible for neutrino masses and lepton mixing remains unknown. More experimental data are needed to constrain and guide possible generalizations of the standard model of particle physics, and reveal the mechanism behind nonzero neutrino masses. Here, the physics associated with searches for the violation of lepton-flavor conservation in charged-lepton processes and the violation of lepton-number conservation in nuclear physics processes is summarized. In the first part, several aspects of charged-lepton flavor violation are discussed, especially its sensitivity to new particles and interactions beyond the standard model of particle physics. The discussion concentrates mostly on rare processes involving muons and electrons. In the second part, the status of the conservation of total lepton number is discussed. The discussion here concentrates on current and future probes of this apparent law of Nature via searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, which is also the most sensitive probe of the potential Majorana nature of neutrinos.
  • We demonstrate the non-negligible effect of transition magnetic moments on three-flavor collective oscillations of Majorana neutrinos in the core of type-II supernovae, within the single-angle approximation. We argue that data from a galactic supernova in conjunction with terrestrial experiments can potentially give us clues about the non-zero nature of neutrino transition magnetic moments if these are Majorana fermions, even if their values are as small as those predicted by the Standard Model augmented by nonzero neutrino Majorana masses.
  • The addition of new multiplets of fermions charged under the Standard Model gauge group is investigated, with the aim of identifying a possible dark matter candidate. These fermions are charged under $SU(2)\times U(1)$, and their quantum numbers are determined by requiring all new particles to obtain masses via Yukawa couplings and all triangle anomalies to cancel as in the Standard Model; more than one multiplet is required and we refer to such a set of these multiplets as a polyplet. For sufficiently large multiplets, the stability of the dark matter candidate is ensured by an accidental symmetry; for clarity, however, we introduce a model with a particularly simple polyplet structure and stabilize the dark matter by imposing a new discrete symmetry. We then explore the features of this model; constraints from colliders, electroweak precision measurements, the dark matter relic density, and direct detection experiments are considered. We find that the model can accommodate a viable dark matter candidate for large Higgs boson masses; for $m_H\sim 125$ GeV, a subdominant contribution to the dark matter relic density can be achieved.
  • We study the effect of Majorana transition magnetic moments on the flavor evolution of neutrinos and antineutrinos inside the core of Type-II supernova explosions. We find non-trivial collective oscillation effects relating neutrinos and antineutrinos of different flavors, even if one restricts the discussion to Majorana transition electromagnetic moment values that are not much larger than those expected from standard model interactions and nonzero neutrino Majorana masses. This appears to be, to the best of our knowledge, the only potentially observable phenomenon sensitive to such small values of Majorana transition magnetic moments. We briefly comment on the effect of Dirac transition magnetic moments and on the consequences of our results for future observations of the flux of neutrinos of different flavors from a nearby supernova explosion.