• We report on the first multi-color precision light curve of the bright Wolf-Rayet binary $\gamma^2$ Velorum, obtained over six months with the nanosatellites in the BRITE- Constellation fleet. In parallel, we obtained 488 high-resolution optical spectra of the system. In this first report on the datasets, we revise the spectroscopic orbit and report on the bulk properties of the colliding winds. We find a dependence of both the light curve and excess emission properties that scales with the inverse of the binary separation. When analyzing the spectroscopic properties in combination with the photometry, we find that the phase dependence is caused only by excess emission in the lines, and not from a changing continuum. We also detect a narrow, high-velocity absorption component from the He I $\lambda$5876 transition, which appears twice in the orbit. We calculate smoothed-particle hydrodynamical simulations of the colliding winds and can accurately associate the absorption from He I to the leading and trailing arms of the wind shock cone passing tangentially through our line of sight. The simulations also explain the general strength and kinematics of the emission excess observed in wind lines such as C III $\lambda$5696 of the system. These results represent the first in a series of investigations into the winds and properties of $\gamma^2$ Velorum through multi-technique and multi-wavelength observational campaigns.
  • We measure chemical abundance ratios and radial velocities in four massive (i.e., young) [alpha/Fe]-rich red giant stars using high-resolution high-S/N spectra from ESPaDOnS fed by Gemini-GRACES. Our differential analysis ensures that our chemical abundances are on the same scale as the Alves-Brito et al. (2010) study of bulge, thin and thick disk red giants. We confirm that the program stars have enhanced [alpha/Fe] ratios and are slightly metal poor. Aside from lithium enrichment in one object, the program stars exhibit no chemical abundance anomalies when compared to giant stars of similar metallicity throughout the Galaxy. This includes the elements Li, O, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Cu, Ba, La, and Eu. Therefore, there are no obvious chemical signatures that can help to reveal the origin of these unusual stars. While our new observations show that only one star (not the Li-rich object) exhibits a radial velocity variation, simulations indicate that we cannot exclude the possibility that all four could be binaries. In addition, we find that two (possibly three) stars show evidence for an infrared excess, indicative of a debris disk. This is consistent with these young [alpha/Fe]-rich stars being evolved blue stragglers, suggesting their apparent young age is a consequence of a merger or mass transfer. We would expect a binary fraction of ~50% or greater for the entire sample of these stars, but the signs of the circumbinary disk may have been lost since these features can have short timescales. Radial velocity monitoring is needed to confirm the blue straggler origin.
  • The multiple star system of delta Orionis is one of the closest examples of a system containing a luminous O-type, bright giant star (component Aa1). It is often used as a spectral-type standard and has the highest observed X-ray flux of any hot-star binary. The main component Aa1 is orbited by two lower mass stars, faint Aa2 in a 5.7 day eclipsing binary, and Ab, an astrometric companion with an estimated period of 346 years. Generally the flux from all three stars is recorded in ground-based spectroscopy, and the spectral decomposition of the components has proved difficult. Here we present HST/STIS ultraviolet spectroscopy of delta Ori A that provides us with spatially separated spectra of Aa and Ab for the first time. We measured radial velocities for Aa1 and Ab in two observations made near the velocity extrema of Aa1. We show tentative evidence for the detection of the Aa2 component in cross-correlation functions of the observed and model spectra. We discuss the appearance of the UV spectra of Aa1 and Ab with reference to model spectra. Both stars have similar effective temperatures, but Ab is fainter and is a rapid rotator. The results will help in the interpretation of ground-based spectroscopy and in understanding the physical and evolutionary parameters of these massive stars.
  • The Gemini Remote Access to CFHT ESPaDONS Spectrograph has achieved first light of its experimental phase in May 2014. It successfully collected light from the Gemini North telescope and sent it through two 270 m optical fibers to the the ESPaDOnS spectrograph at CFHT to deliver high-resolution spectroscopy across the optical region. The fibers gave an average focal ratio degradation of 14% on sky, and a maximum transmittance of 85% at 800nm. GRACES achieved delivering spectra with a resolution power of R = 40,000 and R = 66,000 between 400 and 1,000 nm. It has a ~8% throughput and is sensitive to target fainter than 21st mag in 1 hour. The average acquisition time of a target is around 10 min. This project is a great example of a productive collaboration between two observatories on Maunakea that was successful due to the reciprocal involvement of the Gemini, CFHT, and NRC Herzberg teams, and all the staff involved closely or indirectly.
  • We have used the MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of STars) microsatellite to obtain four weeks of contiguous high-precision broadband visual photometry of the O7.5III(n)((f)) star {\xi} Persei in November 2011. This star is well known from previous work to show prominent DACs (Discrete Absorption Components) on time-scales of about 2 d from UV spectroscopy and NRP (Non Radial Pulsation) with one (l = 3) p-mode oscillation with a period of 3.5 h from optical spectroscopy. Our MOST-orbit (101.4 min) binned photometry fails to reveal any periodic light variations above the 0.1 mmag 3-sigma noise level for periods of hours, while several prominent Fourier peaks emerge at the 1 mmag level in the two-day period range. These longer-period variations are unlikely due to pulsations, including gravity modes. From our simulations based upon a simple spot model, we deduce that we are seeing the photometric modulation of several co-rotating bright spots on the stellar surface. In our model, the starting times (random) and lifetimes (up to several rotations) vary from one spot to another yet all spots rotate at the same period of 4.18 d, the best-estimated rotation period of the star. This is the first convincing reported case of co-rotating bright spots on an O star, with important implications for drivers of the DACs (resulting from CIRs - Corotating Interaction Regions) with possible bright-spot generation via a breakout at the surface of a global magnetic field generated by a subsurface convection zone.
  • Examination of the temporal variability properties of several strong optical recombination lines in a large sample of Galactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars reveals possible trends, especially in the more homogeneous WC than the diverse WN subtypes, of increasing wind variability with cooler subtypes. This could imply that a serious contender for the driver of the variations is stochastic, magnetic subsurface convection associated with the 170 kK partial-ionization zone of iron, which should occupy a deeper and larger zone of greater mass in cooler WR subtypes. This empirical evidence suggests that the heretofore proposed ubiquitous driver of wind variability, radiative instabilities, may not be the only mechanism playing a role in the stochastic multiple small-scaled structures seen in the winds of hot luminous stars. In addition to small-scale stochastic behaviour, subsurface convection guided by a global magnetic field with localized emerging loops may also be at the origin of the large-scale corotating interaction regions as seen frequently in O stars and occasionally in the winds of their descendant WR stars.
  • We present the VVV-SkZ_pipeline, a DAOPHOT-based photometric pipeline, created to perform PSF-fitting photometry of "VISTA Variables in the V\'ia L\'actea" (VVV) ESO Public Survey data. The pipeline replaces the user avoiding repetitive interaction in all the operations, retaining all of the benefits of the power and accuracy of the DAOPHOT suite. The pipeline provides an astrometrized photometric catalog reliable up to more than 2 magnitudes brighter than the saturation limit, where other techniques fail. It also produces deeper and more accurate photometry. These achievements allow the VVV-SkZ_pipeline to produce data well anchored to the selected standard photometric system and analyze important phenomena (i.e. TRGB, RGB slope, HB morphology, RR Lyrae), that other methods are not able to manage.
  • The WR binary CV Serpentis (= WR113, WC8d + O8-9IV) has been a source of mystery since it was shown that its atmospheric eclipses change with time over decades, in addition to its sporadic dust production. The first high-precision time-dependent photometric observations obtained with the MOST space telescope in 2009 show two consecutive eclipses over the 29d orbit, with varying depths. A subsequent MOST run in 2010 showed a seemingly asymmetric eclipse profile. In order to help make sense of these observations, parallel optical spectroscopy was obtained from the Mont Megantic Observatory (2009, 2010) and from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (2009). Assuming these depth variations are entirely due to electron scattering in a beta-law wind, an unprecedented 62% increase in mass-loss rate is observed over one orbital period. Alternatively, no change in mass-loss rate would be required if a relatively small fraction of the carbon ions in the wind globally recombined and coaggulated to form carbon dust grains. However, it remains a mystery as to how this could occur. There also seems to be evidence for the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIR) in the WR wind: a CIR-like signature is found in the light curves, implying a potential rotation period for the WR star of 1.6 d. Finally, a new circular orbit is derived, along with constraints for the wind collision.
  • The putative association between the 10.8 d classical Cepheid TW Nor and the open cluster Lynga 6 has generated considerable debate in the literature. New JHKs photometry in tandem with existing radial velocities for Lynga 6 stars imply cluster membership for TW Nor, and establish the variable as a high-weight calibrator for classical Cepheid relations. Fundamental mean parameters determined for Lynga 6 are: d=1.91+-0.10 kpc, E(J-H)=0.38+-0.02, and log(t)=7.9+-0.1. The Benedict et al.(2007)/Turner (2010) Galactic VIc Wesenheit function was revised using TW Nor's new parameters: W_VI,0=(-3.37+-0.08)log(P_0)-2.48+-0.08. TW Nor/Lynga 6 lie beyond the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm and occupy the Centaurus arm, along with innumerable young Cepheids and clusters (e.g., VW Cen & VVV CL070).
  • We report the serendipitous discovery of a collision ring galaxy, identified as 2MASX J06470249+4554022, which we have dubbed 'Auriga's Wheel', found in a SUPRIME-CAM frame as part of a larger Milky Way survey. This peculiar class of galaxies is the result of a near head-on collision between typically, a late type and an early type galaxy. Subsequent GMOS-N long-slit spectroscopy has confirmed both the relative proximity of the components of this interacting pair and shown it to have a redshift of 0.111. Analysis of the spectroscopy reveals that the late type galaxy is a LINER class Active Galactic Nuclei while the early type galaxy is also potentially an AGN candidate, this is very uncommon amongst known collision ring galaxies. Preliminary modeling of the ring finds an expansion velocity of ~200 kms^-1 consistent with our observations, making the collision about 50 Myr old. The ring currently has a radius of about 10 kpc and a bridge of stars and gas is also visible connecting the two galaxies.
  • VISTA Variables in the V\'{\i}a L\'actea (VVV) is one of the six ESO Public Surveys operating on the new 4-meter Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). VVV is scanning the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the disk, where star formation activity is high. One of the principal goals of the VVV Survey is to find new star clusters of different ages. In order to trace the early epochs of star cluster formation we concentrated our search in the directions to those of known star formation regions, masers, radio, and infrared sources. The disk area covered by VVV was visually inspected using the pipeline processed and calibrated $K_{\rm S}$-band tile images for stellar overdensities. Subsequently, we examined the composite $JHK_{\rm S}$ and $ZJK_{\rm S}$ color images of each candidate. PSF photometry of $15\times15$ arcmin fields centered on the candidates was then performed on the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit reduced images. After statistical field-star decontamination, color-magnitude and color-color diagrams were constructed and analyzed. We report the discovery of 96 new infrared open clusters and stellar groups. Most of the new cluster candidates are faint and compact (with small angular sizes), highly reddened, and younger than 5\,Myr. For relatively well populated cluster candidates we derived their fundamental parameters such as reddening, distance, and age by fitting the solar-metallicity Padova isochrones to the color-magnitude diagrams.
  • Direct imaging of the HR8799 system was a major achievement in the study of exoplanets. HR8799 is a $\gamma$\,Doradus variable and asteroseismology can provide an independent constraint on the inclination. Using 650 high signal-to-noise, high resolution, full visual wavelength spectroscopic observations obtained over two weeks at Observatoire de Haute Provence (OHP) with the SOPHIE spectrograph we find that the main frequency in the radial velocity data is 1.9875 d$^{-1}$. This frequency corresponds to the main frequency as found in previous photometric observations. Using the FAMIAS software to identify the pulsation modes, we find this frequency is a prograde $\ell$=1 sectoral mode and obtain the constraint that inclination $i\gtrsim$40$^{\circ}$.
  • We present the results of an intensive photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the WN4 Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR1=HD4004. Our broadband V photometry covering a timespan of 91 days shows variability with a period of P=16.9$^{+0.6}_{-0.3}$ days. The same period is also found in our spectral data. The light-curve is non-sinusoidal with hints of a gradual change in its shape as a function of time. The photometric variations nevertheless remain coherent over several cycles and we estimate that the coherence timescale of the light-curve is of the order of 60 days. The spectroscopy shows large-scale line-profile variability which can be interpreted as excess emission peaks moving from one side of the profile to the other on a timescale of several days. Although we cannot unequivocally exclude the unlikely possibility that WR1 is a binary, we propose that the nature of the variability we have found strongly suggests that it is due to the presence in the wind of the WR star of large-scale structures, most likely Co-rotating Interaction Regions (CIRs), which are predicted to arise in inherently unstable radiatively driven winds when they are perturbed at their base. We also suggest that variability observed in WR6, WR134 and WR137 is of the same nature. Finally, assuming that the period of CIRs is related to the rotational period, we estimate the rotation rate of the four stars for which sufficient monitoring has been carried out; i.e. v$_{rot}$=6.5, 40, 70 and 275 km/s for WR1, WR6, WR134 and WR137, respectively.